You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 07, 2016, 08:39:00 AM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: EU Referendum / BREXIT  (Read 9315 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Strident

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2016, 09:03:42 AM »
On a website like this, I would have thought one arguement that would hold a lot of weight is defence of freedom of speech.

Freedom of speech always goes hand in hand with having the most robust and accountable democracy you can muster.

It's true that one particular group of unelected people *might* make a nice law that defends personal freedom and liberty.

However, the next lot of unelected individuals may not. And if they are not elected they can't be fired by the people.

British democracy is far from perfect. It is, however far more democratically accountable than the EU.

The EU is not static. It's direction of travel is towards being state.  Over the past 20 years it had acquired a currency, a president, an anthem, a flag etc...

It seems very likely it will aquire some form of army fairly soon (Although I suspect it will initally be called something like a "joint defence force")

The direction of travel is towards a single state. I estimate it will get there in between 30 to 50 years.

And when it gets there, what kind of state will it be?

It will not, by any reasonable measure be a democratic one.

Yes, there is a parliament, which is the only elected part of the whole thing. The  parliament merely votes through legislation handed to it by the unelected Council and commission.

Their deliberations are often held in secret. As indeed, are their deliberations by which they appoint the presidents. Surely, a country appointing it's president by secret deliberations of an unelected Council is....troubling?

Some would argue the Parliament is democratic. Well, first, the Parliament lacks much real power, but, even leaving that aside, it isn't really democratic at all.

People vote for parties, not individuals. The national parties of each Nation then appoint members of Parliament of THEIR choosing and can appoint a number of them proportionate to the percentage of the vote they got.

However, different MEPs from the same party may have wildly differing views, so, in what sense, have you voted for a representative of your opinion? You havnt.

Not only that but the parties don't sit individually. They form blocks with parties of similar ilk from different countries.

And not only that, but apart from those who are effectively protesters against the whole Euro project, nearly all votes are passed with agreement from all sides. There is no true oppositional democracy at work here. Your vote does not really say anything or influence anything.

This is in why I will be voting out. I think most people who enjoy the freedom to write and publish freely on the Internet (I.e. Members of this kind of forum) should consider the democratic accountability argument very carefully before voting.

Online RedRose

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2016, 01:29:16 PM »
I have a number of continental friends who moved to UK for various reasons (from job, to security), and are quite worried about what's going to happen. None of them are a burden to British society, some even really contribute to it. Granted I'm not as up to date as I should be on this topic.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2016, 05:35:05 PM »
Again, a few problems there, Strident. 

First, there's no such thing as the EU president.  Amusingly, Wikipedia's page on President of the EU comes straight off the bat:

Quote
President of the European Union (or President of Europe) does not exist

So we can dismiss all of your claims about the president.  They're wrong.

Second, as Neroon pointed out the EU government is considerably more democratically accountable than our own government.  Specifically, the Council which you claim is unelected is in fact elected.

Third, all of your complaints either hold equally true for our own national government or are untrue:

Quote
People vote for parties, not individuals. The national parties of each Nation then appoint members of Parliament of THEIR choosing and can appoint a number of them proportionate to the percentage of the vote they got.

Sort of.  We have MEPs.  They are elected directly using proportional representation.  The ballot paper quite clearly indicates the names of the individuals.  Here is an image of the ballot paper and here is a video explaining how it all works.  In essence, you're wrong on the order (members are chosen by the party before the election, not after) and I really don't see what's so suspicious/objectionable about it?

Quote
However, different MEPs from the same party may have wildly differing views, so, in what sense, have you voted for a representative of your opinion? You havnt.

And that differs from our own government how?  To take an a propos example, the Conservative party is bitterly split on the leave/remain issue.

Quote
Not only that but the parties don't sit individually. They form blocks with parties of similar ilk from different countries.

Not at all like the coalition government we had recently, then.

Quote
And not only that, but apart from those who are effectively protesters against the whole Euro project, nearly all votes are passed with agreement from all sides. There is no true oppositional democracy at work here. Your vote does not really say anything or influence anything.

No, this isn't true either.  Here is a list of recent EU parliament votes.  As you can see, there is far from a unanimous decision on them, and the stats helpfully give the percentage of people who voted along "party lines" which is regularly less than 100%

You're free, of course, to vote leave and I tend to agree with you that the trend is for greater federalisation/centralisation.  I'm not sure I agree with your assessment that the EU is a threat to free speech per se (and, frankly, I personally don't care if it is - but that's a different conversation entirely) but if you feel it is then sure.  But some of the basis for your argument is wrong and some I don't think I understand - your objection to proportional representation specifically.  I voted against PR in the referendum but I don't think it's some massive confidence trick - you seem to assert that it's a problem but never explain why.

Offline Scribbles

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2016, 05:41:10 AM »
I'm begging my family over there to vote to stay, mostly because I believe that Europe, united, is stronger. I'm tired of silly disagreements between nations tearing everyone around them down and while I know that the EU has a lot of kinks it needs to knock out, I feel that it's nothing that can't be worked out over time.

I know that's mostly rhetoric but I've been discussing this for awhile now with friends and family and am completely drained regarding this topic....

Offline hamish1024

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2016, 12:49:18 PM »
I'm slightly embarrassed that we're even *having* a referendum on this. I do wonder what it looks like to non-Brits. Feels like Cameron threw it into his election pledges without expecting to actually win a majority and have to carry it out! Most experts and business leaders seem to be pro-EU. The anti-EU arguments feel like a grab-bag of vague discontentment with the modern world that won't actually be fixed by leaving.

The anti-EU argument started with an economic and world influence focus, humming 'Rule Britannia' to itself with increasing insistence. Then basically every expert pointed out that leaving wouldn't help those things at all. So, over the last few weeks, the anti-EU side has found more traction by switching it's focus to immigration. It's a sensitive subject, and difficult to talk about objectively, but one thing seems to have been overlooked - the majority of immigration into the UK is from outside of the EU!!

Basically, a large portion of the British electorate are going to vote Leave Europe on the basis that they don't like Asian immigrants. It would almost be funny, if it wasn't also quite terrifying.

Offline Khoraz

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2016, 01:15:41 PM »
As someone voting Leave,  it's a bit insulting to read people saying how we're all haters of immigrants and don't actually know what's going on on the world.

Offline hamish1024

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2016, 01:43:00 PM »
I'm sorry if that's what you took from my post Khoraz, but that's not what I meant.

I *knew* this was going to cause problems, I *said* it was a sensitive subject... but here goes... A dislike of immigration is a valid position. It's not one I share, but it is valid.

However, the lengths to which the pro-Leave newspapers are going to link the issues of Brexit and immigration in the public psyche, when in reality they are hugely separate issues... well, that *is* pretty insulting.

I don't think anyone would argue that the level of information in this debate, from both sides, has been particularly honest. It actually *is* pretty hard to know what is going on!

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2016, 04:58:20 PM »
Plus, there's the fact that uncontrolled immigration puts us at risk from external terrorists who can just come in with minimal checks; the amount of immigrants saying that they're Syrian who are actually from other middle-eastern countries that have nothing to do with the Syrian conflict is staggering, and the problem is that the EU hamstrings our ability to enforce our own borders. Add onto that that we have barely enough jobs and housing for the people who are ALREADY here, I don't think the UK economy can - at the moment - handle the amount of refugees that the EU wants us to take. Yes, the immigrants come from outside the EU, but they tend to enter the EU elsewhere, and then use the Open Borders to move from country to country, and the UK is unable to stop them.

Do you have any citation about the fake-Syrian claim?  I've had a quick google and found nothing.  Further, the UK doesn't have an Open Borders policy.  The policy in question is called the Schengen agreement and the UK isn't a member.  Unlike...

Quote
Honestly, the best case scenario is if we strike a deal similar to Norway; that is, we're outside the EU, but within the EFTA (European Free Trade Association). Worldwide, Norway has among the highest capita per head and the highest standard of living and one of the strongest economies, and it's got nothing to do with the EU past the EFTA, which should serve to blow the "Stay" Campaign out of the water. The "Stay" Campaign has been one giant Fearmongering attempt, and - if recent polls are to be believed - people ain't buying it any more.

...Norway.  Which is a member of Schengen.  That is to say, it has considerably less control over its borders than the UK does and in fact has literally no say over its EU resident immigration policy. Norway has a higher percentage of immigrants than the UK,

While "nothing to do with the EU beyond EFTA" is technically correct, it doesn't mean what you think it means.  Norway has to abide by EU Common Market rules.  Again, to be clear, Norway has to follow the bulk of the rules (it's around 75%) that the UK does wrt trade and the like but has no say over what those rules are.  It doesn't make it's own trade agreements, EFTA make them.  EFTA contains more countries than the EU. 

I am constantly amazed by claims we should adopt the Norwegian model.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2016, 05:33:42 PM »
And no, we don't have fully open borders, but we are significantly hamstrung in what we can actually do by the European Free Movement stuff.

That's not the European Free Movement (which is Schengen).  That was a specific screw-up by the government of 2004 which failed to impose transitional arrangements for the EU expansion.  We are in no way hamstrung by Schengen.  We are not part of it.

Quote
Well, I said that we should aim for an agreement similar to Norway, not that we should completely adopt their model.
That being said, you're right in that I wasn't entirely clear on how the EFTA worked; in that case, we're probably better off outside the EFTA as well. If we can get a Free Trade Deal, then brilliant, but considering that the majority of our imports and exports are from outside the EU either way, we'll be fine if we decide to leave.

You're comparing apples and oranges here.  About 1/3 of our trade is with the EU (and so 2/3 with non-EU countries).  However, it's not correct to directly compare these two cases.  The EU trade can be lumped together, non-EU trade can't.  So, for example, our biggest single trading partner is the US, but our trade with France and Germany alone - ignoring the rest of the EU - is larger.  The key thing to remember is that we need to look at trade with each entity and "not a member of the EU" isn't, for these purposes, an entity.  Long story short, our major trading partner is overwhelmingly the EU - precise stats seem to vary wildly for some reason but taking a rough back of the envelope average about 33% of our trade is with the EU with the next highest (the US) being about 10%.  We really need a trade deal with the EU and that will take a non-zero amount of time to sort out in the event of us leaving.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2016, 06:53:38 PM »
I'm not specifically talking about the Schengen, I'm talking more about the general EU rules and regulations that they impose on all the EU members, and the powers that they've effectively supplanted and taken away.


And honestly? I disagree. The fact that "Non EU" can't be lumped together is irrelevant; the fact remains that only a third of our trade is with the EU CURRENTLY, which means that we would only lose a third of our trade IF the EU decided to stop trading with us entirely....which is impossible, since we're one of THE biggest buyers in the world. As the main buyers, WE have the power, and we can easily buy anything made in Europe elsewhere. The ONLY reason we don't trade with a single entity more is because of the EU tariffs. China and The Commonwealth, for example, WANT to trade with us because we're such massive buyers, we just can't come up with our own Trade Deals because of EU legislation. And anybody who claims that the USA will stop trading with us if we leave the EU....well, again, we're one of the biggest buyers. So..unlikely, to say the least.
The thing is, Kythia, it doesn't matter whether non-EU countries are a unified block or not. It really doesn't. They're our single largest partner, yes, but that's because of the free trade agreement and the fact that they impose tariffs on external-EU trade. If we were to leave the EU, we would find other suppliers for our needs on our own terms in a snap because - in any market - the BUYER has the final power over who to buy FROM. How about the Commonwealth? They are extremely eager to trade with the UK, and their economies at the moment - by and large - are MUCH stronger than the EU's, India and Canada's specifically.
So really, I fail to see your point. So what if the EU is the single biggest trading partner? The fact remains that it's still the minority of our overall trade, and I highly doubt our external-to-EU partners would stop trading with us if we left Europe. Let alone the fact that the chances of the EU stopping trade with us altogether are astronomically tiny, since - if we do so much business with them - THEY would be hit harder than US if they stopped trading with us, considering the states of their economies. In a European Recession, they need to sell to whoever buys to make money, and not trading with the UK would be cutting off their nose to spite their face. They'd come off worse from that, and they know it, hence why they're so desperate to keep the UK in.

The simple fact of the matter is that since the UK does a lot more importing goods than exporting - we tend to export workers more than actual goods - WE have the power in terms of trade deals, since WE'RE the ones buying it, so we can simply go elsewhere. Saying "Oh, the EU is our biggest single trading partner, ergo, we need to stay in" is missing the fact that the ONLY reason they're our biggest trading partner is because they are a Free Trade Area, and they impose tariffs on external-EU trading. Without those two factors, we have MUCH more choice in the matter than you seem to be implying.

I didn't intend to imply we had no choice in the matter, we do for the reasons you point out and others.  But.  We, the UK, don't have a trade deal with the US or any Commonwealth nation or China or India or literally anywhere.  When we leave the EU, we will have nothing on that front.  Sure, it's not like we have the referendum and then that evening when the votes are counted we're out in the cold - there will be some period between us deciding to leave and actually leaving when we could start trying to build that.  The minimum period is two years but I guess the precise timeline isn't sorted yet.  However, trade deals take a lot longer than that to set up.  So at the point at which we leave we'll have nothing.  "We could set them up at some point in the future" doesn't help our economy today.  Sure, there's the principle of continuity which would help us - I exaggerate when I say "nothing" - but the fact remains that our economy will be severely weakened until that happens and it's not even clear that Vienna applies to the EU.

You claim that being a bigger buyer means getting a better deal: the EU as a block is about three hundred times a bigger buyer than we are (in monetary terms).  By your own logic our trade deals negotiated on our own will be worse.  We will be a much much smaller buyer than we were before.  Further, you're only looking at this from one side.  Yes, we are a major buyer on a worldwide scale.  That doesn't make us a major receiver from the other country's point of view.  We account for only 6% of EU "exports" for example and that figure will crash once we no longer have a free trade agreement with them (which we wouldn't when we left the EU and no realistic chance of us getting one).  We account for 2% of US exports.  2.5% of Chinese.  You are massively overstating the case by only considering our view of a country, not their view of us.

EDIT:  To clarify a point I'm not sure I made well - other countries are overwhelmingly the buyer in our relationships with us, not us.  By your logic, they hold the power.

Incidentally, you claim that "anyone who says the US would stop trading with us... etc" . Well, no one's saying that they'd stop trade, of course. The US has repeatedly made it clear it's not interested in a FTA with the UK though. 

Much of your post seems to be based on hope, to be honest. 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2016, 07:03:05 PM by Kythia »

Offline Khoraz

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #35 on: June 11, 2016, 07:01:17 PM »
Quote
Much of your post seems to be based on hope, to be honest.

Just to jump in, I would much rather vote on the lines of hope, than on fear. Which is all the Remain campaign has been providing. Just a constant stream of how everything will collapse and fail if we leave the EU, which just isn't true.

People are terrified of big change and like to maintain the status quo, which is why this fear mongering will probably be successful.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #36 on: June 11, 2016, 07:04:01 PM »
Just to jump in, I would much rather vote on the lines of hope, than on fear. Which is all the Remain campaign has been providing. Just a constant stream of how everything will collapse and fail if we leave the EU, which just isn't true.

People are terrified of big change and like to maintain the status quo, which is why this fear mongering will probably be successful.

What makes you think it isn't true? 

If I say "smoking substantially increases your chances of getting lung cancer" am I fear mongering or pointing out a fact?

Finally, let's not claim this is one sided.  I received this monstrosity the other day.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2016, 07:06:42 PM by Kythia »

Offline Khoraz

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #37 on: June 11, 2016, 07:11:15 PM »
It's just taken to extremes - obviousky it will take time to reestablish trade and alliances and laws, but there are so many countries that aren't in the EU who miraculously haven't imploded.

Also yeah, that is utterly ridiculous - both sides are extreme, but it feels like the Remain is a lot more fear-ish than Leave. Maybe I'm biased, but that's how it feels to me. And certainly a lot of people I know have decided on Leave purely because of how sick they are of the Remain tactics.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #38 on: June 11, 2016, 07:16:02 PM »
And certainly a lot of people I know have decided on Leave purely because of how sick they are of the Remain tactics.

Wow...

Seriously?

They've decided how to vote on an incredibly important decision based solely on the fact they don't like the way an argument is presented.  That's...I have no words.  That is, just, unbelievably irresponsible and childish. I hope to god you've tried to beat some sense and basic responsibility in to them.

Offline Khoraz

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #39 on: June 11, 2016, 07:20:08 PM »
... its a bit more than that. People have been caught out in lies, and there's been some very undiplomatic practices going on by the government to try and tell people how to vote. That isn't right.

But still, I think I'm going to leave it there since you've just insulted pretty much my whole family.

Just because people form their opinions in different ways and based off different things, that doesn't mean they're childish or irresponsible. It representitive of a bigger problem that people are becoming aware of. That's all.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2016, 08:18:09 PM »
First off:  China stats  My apologies, I should have explicitly linked it in the first place.

A side issue - it was Thatcher who negotiated the CAP rebate, not Blair.  I think that's what you're saying there?  Honestly not sure precisely how that clause was intended.

Anyway:

It's far from clear the EU is a sinking ship - at the moment EU economic growth is considerably higher than the UK's or the US's at the moment.  Making economic predictions is a notoriously black art and I'd hesitate to commit to that in either direction though.  With a similar caveat for the UK economy in the case of Brexit.

Our economy would certainly "survive" leaving the EU.  I don't think anyone is claiming we would be plunged back in to tribal hunter gatherer status.  That's not the question though - as you indicate the question is whether we would be better served by leaving or staying. 

I believe the Commonwealth is a bit of a red herring.  First, look at the countries we're talking about.  I'm culturally Pakistani but even I admit there's frankly very little of theirs that we want.  You say (earlier) that we can get the stuff we need from "anywhere" but that's not true - to take an over-blown example, we won't be buying bulk condoms from the Vatican any time soon and our attempts to source Saudi bacon are doomed to failure.  We can only buy what they're selling and I'm not clear that the Commonwealth can provide to our needs as well as the EU can.  More importantly, though, do we actually want closer links?  Like, some of those guys are just awful.  We're a first-world liberal democracy - how well do our interests overlap with some of the disreputable fringe?  There's an interesting analysis here.  There are other potential trading blocks, etc, out there - BRIC countries for example, that I think we should look at long before the Commonwealth.

I'm not precisely clear what you refer to in the "EU's soaring budget".  Administration costs are about 6% which is comparable to our 4.6% (calculated from here and here).  As to non-admin costs the important point to note is that we get something back.  We are, in essence, purchasing a wide array of services from the EU.  Sure, there is sensible debate about whether what we're getting is worth what we're paying but an increase in the EU budget means an increase in EU investment in the UK because investing in member countries is literally the only thing the EU does other than administrate itself (and I'm casting the term "investment" quite broadly, including legal issues through Strasbourg for example).

I dunno.  To me, a lot of your argument seems to depend on a...well, as I say a "hope" that the UK will weather the storm of a potential loss and emerge from the other side stronger.  And sure, per above economic predictions are roughly on a par with chicken entrails in their accuracy.  Maybe it will.  Maybe it won't.  To me, the economic arguments aren't the main ones in forming my decision for exactly this reason. We do definitely know it will get worse, though, and I'm not sure we should be trading a hoped for future gain for a certain present loss.  It's the equivalent of making our savings plan "the National Lottery". 

As to your parenthetical comment - I don't terribly want to get in to this as its off topic but I will quickly say that you've fallen what a friend of mine calls a "has-a is-a" trap.  I didn't say that those people were childish and irresponsible, I said that particular action of theirs was childish and irresponsible.  In other aspects of their life they may be the very embodiment of sensible maturity.  If you brain-farted and said the capital of the UK was Birmingham I would say that was a stupid thing to say, that's in no way the same as saying you're stupid.  You (and Khoraz for that matter but I don't particularly want to drag back in someone who has left the conversation) seem to be trying to apply personality traits here when in fact we all do stupid, intelligent, childish, mature, irresponsible, responsible things at different times in our life with no lasting effects on our worth as people.  You with me?  Not sure how well I've explained that.  I do, for the record, feel "superior" is an appropriate way to feel about our respective ways of making that decision.  That is, again, not the same as saying I feel superior to them.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #41 on: June 11, 2016, 08:39:50 PM »
Good night

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #42 on: June 21, 2016, 12:09:06 AM »
Wow, that goes radically downhill after 2:10.  It starts getting a bit tinfoil hat after that point don't you think?

Offline TaintedAndDelishTopic starter

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #43 on: June 21, 2016, 05:32:47 AM »
Quote
I don't think it's Tinfoil hatty at all to say "Look how close we are, if they decide to remove that Article, we're fucked."

Hypothetically speaking, If the EU did remove article 50 the UK left afterwards,, would the EU be able to do anything about it without shooting themselves in the foot?



Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #44 on: June 21, 2016, 06:16:10 AM »
See this is kinda my point. The Lisbon Treaty is a treaty. People can't modify it just because they feel like it. It's an agreement between nations not a "law" in the sense you mean it. There is no mechanism for making the changes you propose. It's tinfoil hat stuff.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #45 on: June 21, 2016, 06:28:55 AM »
I'm sorry Vergil, no. That's not true. The Lisbon Treaty itself lays out how Eu treaties are amended. There are three ways of doing it. SRP and passerelle don't apply here leaving ORP. This requires member states to sign and ratify the new treaty, in essence giving them an opt out. I'm not certain where you're getting your information from but it is wrong. The thing you're proposing is literally impossible.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #46 on: June 21, 2016, 06:44:36 AM »
I'm really sorry, I think I might be misunderstanding you? As I read your argument, the EU (hypothetically) wants rid of section 50 with no replacement meaning countries can't leave. They then use international pressure to coerce individual member states to sign and ratify with the threat being... What precisely. You mention the Irish referendum (technically you mention a Northern Irish one, I'm assuming you meant Irish, if not can you clarify?) but I'm not clear on the relevance. We, the UK are having an in/out referendum. Are you suggesting that in the case of a "leave" vote there'll be another one? If not, I'm not sure how the Irish one applies.

Anyway. No. There is no mechanism that doesn't invoke hypothetical and counterfactual "international pressure" to allow that to happen. It's not, currently, possible. Its based on a misunderstanding of how the EU works and /or Conspiracy theories.

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #47 on: June 21, 2016, 07:08:01 AM »
First off, as Neroon has pointed out, we get our desired results on EU policy considerably more than most countries. I'm not sure where your claims of us having little real influence come from, do you have a source?

But that's a side issue. You state that the hypothetical USE is a bad thing but offer no reason why? I'm not convinced that it will happen but even if it does you've offered nothing beyond assertion that it's a negative. What's your issue here?

Offline Kythia

  • Noooo-one Fights like Kythia no-one bites like Kythia
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Gender: Female
  • No one chain smokes Marlboro lights like Kythia
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #48 on: June 21, 2016, 07:47:58 AM »
That seems like a long list of reasons a USE is impossible. It's pretty much the same as the list I'd give it asked why I think it would never happen. Yet despite that, despite the fact it would face so very many obstacles to its setup and to its functioning you think it will happen? Really? If "despite the fact that such an entity would be demonstrably crippled and is opposed by everyone if it ever happened, I still think it will and it should weigh in your voting" isn't scaremongering I'm genuinely not clear what is.

Offline Beorning

Re: EU Referendum / BREXIT
« Reply #49 on: June 22, 2016, 03:30:20 PM »
Ugh. The referendum is tomorrow... I really fear for the results :(