You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 04, 2016, 04:25:13 PM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: Beer Blog  (Read 29701 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ramster

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #150 on: September 19, 2010, 06:20:53 PM »
I'm assuming you already knew this, but a butt is an old fashioned term for a beer barrel. Hence, 'Entire Butt'. Have you had the chance to try Kwak yet? Now there's a bafflingly-named beer in a highly unusually shaped glass, with a great taste and drinkability to boot. 'Kwak' is Dutch slang for 'spooge', hence my amusement. Just look at this, and you'll see what I mean about the glass. The glass itself fits loosely into the wooden handle:



Not very practical, but highly artistic and characteristic!

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #151 on: September 19, 2010, 06:25:34 PM »
Yeah, but calling the referring to the beer itself by its container name seems a bit odd; plus, it was a good chance to make a butt joke.

As for Kwak, Ket keeps recommending it to me (now I know why..spooge  ::)), so I'll have to pick one up next time I'm at the beer store!

In case anyone missed it, there's a new review on the last post of the previous page:

Today's beer is Yuengling Porter.

Originally brought to popularity by 18th century London workers transportation eager to imbibe after a hard day's work, Porter was the first hybrid beer. The combination of an old stale ale, a freshly-brewed brown ale, and a weak ale resulted in the classic Porter recipe, commonly referred to as "Entire Butt". I have yet to figure out exactly why it was given that nickname, so let's chalk it up to English eccentricity for now since the brew itself tastes nothing like butt, much less an entire one.

Porters reached their prime peak of popularity during the Industrial Revolution and have since unfortunately stagnated in the UK to a certain extent; fortunately for those of us on the other side of the Atlantic, the American home-brewing revolution has revamped the recipe. In addition to the traditional combination of black, chocolate, and crystal malts, American brewers have added a slew of innovations such as increasing the amount of hops (then again, Americans do that with damn near any beer they can get their hands on) and incorporating smoked malts to augment the smoky character common in many Porters; in fact, some brewers actually add chocolate or coffee to bring that flavor out even further.

As for the brewery itself, Yuengling is widely-renowned as the oldest still-active brewery in America. Since 1829, they've been pumping out quality beer that blurs the line between mass-production and micro-brew. Their Traditional Lager is my stand-by beer anytime I go to a party or bar and want to drink something good without breaking the bank, so I'm interested to see how they do with another style.



Brewed by:
Yuengling Brewery
Pottsville, Pennslyvania (United States)
Style- American Porter
ABV- 4.7%

Poured from a 12oz brown bottle with a twist-off cap and no freshness date.

Appearance- 3.5 out of 5. The only colors this beer has are the creamy tan one-finger head and the deep brown around the edges; aside from that, the rest is pitch-black even when held up to the light. Typical porter in appearance, but some more head would have been nice (a phrase uttered by all men at one point or another). At least it sticks around for a while.

Smell- 3 out of 5. The scents in this beer are somewhat subdued. Coffee, charcoal, and caramel stand out with an undertone of dark malt. It smells like a Stout with shyness issues.

Taste- 4 out of 5. As with the smell, there's nothing significantly strong about this brew; luckily, the tastes are still savory despite their subtlety. That scent of coffee becomes the main taste with nutty notes as well. A taste that's more like roasted cocoa beans than actual chocolate mingles alongside a little burnt wood. Hardly any hops appear in the beer aside from a little bitterness. The aftertaste is probably the best part of this beer-- all of the flavors come together and a leave a semi-sweet, semi-smoky residue. The flavors get stronger as it warms, so warm it up a little to fully enjoy it (or cool it down if you don't want to taste it, but if that's the case, why in the hell are you drinking it in the first place?)

Mouthfeel- 3.5 out of 5. Medium-bodied, like creamy coffee with a dry finish. The fact that I've mentioned coffee in three out of five sections should tell you something.

Drinkability- 4 out of 5. It may not be strong, but it's good. Unlike some porters, you could probably drink a whole six pack of this stuff. If you've never tried a Porter before, start here. This is definitely an Autumn and Winter kind of beer.

Overall, a B.

Bonus! For anyone interested, a brew by the name of Entire Butt is still being produced by the UK's Salopian Brewing Company. More to come on that when I obtain a bottle.

Offline Ramster

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #152 on: September 19, 2010, 07:02:51 PM »
Enjoy Entire Butt fresh from the bunghole today!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunghole

Offline Ket

  • Electroslut Extraordinaire
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2008
  • Location: You'll find me under the gun of a tattoo artist...
  • Gender: Female
  • The Onion Queen - crispy fried goodness
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 5
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #153 on: September 19, 2010, 07:55:33 PM »
I had absolutely no idea what Kwak meant. Honestly.

You really do need to try it. I got you a freaking gift card so you wouldn't have to bitch about spending more than $10 of your own money on a beer!

Sadly, I didn't have one of those nifty glasses when I tried it. I didn't like it at first, but as it warmed it became better.

Yes, insert copious amounts of "That's what she said." jokes here.  ::)

Offline Will

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #154 on: September 19, 2010, 10:01:22 PM »
You ripped the label, pogue.

I wasn't even aware Yuengling made a porter.  I probably wouldn't have tried it anyway had I known; the only variety besides the lager I've tried is the Black and Tan, and I was not pleased. :(

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #155 on: September 20, 2010, 08:03:46 AM »
You ripped the label, pogue.

I wasn't even aware Yuengling made a porter.  I probably wouldn't have tried it anyway had I known; the only variety besides the lager I've tried is the Black and Tan, and I was not pleased. :(

Yeah, I prefer genuine black and tans. Turning a custom two-layered drink into a mass-produced brew doesn't really work well regardless of the brewer, but Yuengling's tasted too burnt and lacked the lighter half of the two-tone flavor that made Black and Tans famous to begin with. It's not totally bad, but it's not a Black and Tan.

As for the label, I bought it that way!

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #156 on: September 20, 2010, 10:41:19 AM »
I've actually seen tall, narrow glasses like that at several Renfaires - although typically they are much longer and are sold as a 'yard of ale'.  The shape apparently makes it difficult to stop the flow of liquid once it starts - sort of a medieval beer-bong.  Whether this is an intentional choice in regards to the Kwak brew - I leave that to the experts to determine.

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #157 on: September 20, 2010, 07:30:23 PM »
Mmmm, I love yard glasses.

Hooray beer!

To celebrate the 300 year anniversary of the Irish Red style, today's beer is Samuel Adams Irish Red!

Irish Red is a particular substyle of Amber/Red Ales that was originally brewed in Kilkenny, Ireland in 1710; it is usually smooth and dry with mild sweetness and mild bitterness. Almost everything about Irish Reds is blissfully balanced and pleasing on the palate. Dextrins are often evident as well; for those who don't know, dextrins are the part of barley that can't be fermented. When left unfiltered, they add flavor and body to the beer. Higher temperatures generally tend to produce more dextrins, which explains why they are common in warm temperature-fermenting ales.

The red color common to this style results from the a fairly uncommon caramel barley malt being roasted longer and slower than most beers, though many large-scale commercial brewers simply add red coloring after the beer has been fermented. Bad form, brewers. Bad form indeed. Samuel Adams raises the bar with this brew by importing the Golding hops from East Kent and adding a bit of pale malt to the traditional caramel malt in order to deepen the flavor.



Brewed by:
Samuel Adams (Boston Beer Company)
Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
Style- Irish Red
ABV- 5.8%

Poured from a 12oz brown bottle notched with a freshness date of November 2010.

Appearance- 3.5 out of 5. This Irish Red is only really red when you hold it up to the light; otherwise, it's a fair amber hue. Bright light turns the center into the color of a brilliant translucent ruby soaked in ruddy beer. It pours with a huge slightly tan head that quickly dissipates but leaves behind a little lacing.

Smell- 4 out of 5. This stuff smells somewhat strong, which is surprising considering the usually laid-back nature of Irish Reds. What stands out most is the caramel sweetness and an undertone of what can only be described as nougat. It's a lot like inhaling a liquefied Milky Way candy bar. Hardly any hops in the nose.

Taste- 4 out of 5. The sweetness isn't as evident in the taste as it was in the smell; in fact, the tastes somewhat contradict the scents. There is a bit of earthiness from the Golding hops and a bit of bite from what seems like Fuggle hops as well, which makes sense considering the British Isle-style of this beer. The sweetness from the caramel malt is there as well along with a roasted flavor. Toffee undertones and pine hops mingle before a dry, earthy aftertaste sets in. To sum it up, sweet, earthy, and roasted.

Mouthfeel- 2.5 out of 5. The body of this beer is a bit of a let-down. Normally, Irish Reds are creamy and fairly full-bodied from the dextrins, but this one barely manages to be medium-bodied. It's not bad, but the mouthfeel doesn't match the taste and doesn't properly reflect the style.

Drinkability- 3.5 out of 5. All bitching about the body aside, this is a good, balanced beer. There is nothing challenging or strong about it; it's just an easily-swallowed, good-tasting, mouth-pleasing mild little brew, as an Irish Red should be. The drinkability score only takes a hit because of the beer's price; it's good, but not quite good enough for me to buy six packs on a regular basis. Look for single bottles or try it at the bar if you're on a budget.

Overall, a B-.

Unsolicited Reiteration of the day!:
Most of you probably read my earlier advice about tasting a beer on an empty stomach in order to truly appreciate it; unfortunately, a friend of mine did not read it. He slammed a usually-delicious brand of beer and said he "didn't see what all the fuss was about". It turns out he drank it after dinner. I made him drink it before eating the next day, and his opinion was much more positive the second time around. If you read my reviews then try the brews and don't detect half the flavors I mention, try drinking it on an empty stomach. Hunger enhances both your sense of smell and your sense of taste tenfold. I've always lamented the fact that pregnant women shouldn't drink because they are in a perfect position to appreciate every fine point about a beer that even trained experts might miss simply by virtue of their biology.

Some beers go great with food (try IPAs and Indian food for a perfect pairing), so don't think that you have to starve in order to enjoy good beer. Just keep it in mind for when you explore a new style.

°BONUS!

For anyone in these states (AL, AR, AZ, CT, HI, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, MO, NC, NJ, OH, OK, SD, TX, UT, VT, or WV), send an index card or letter with your name, address, phone number, email, and date of birth to:

INMAR Fulfillment Center
Attn: Boston Lager
Program: BOSBLF01
PO Box 426008
Del Rio, TX 78842-6008

and you'll be sent a free (FREE!) "Samuel Adams Perfect Pint Glass". (If you live in any other state, send three UPCs from Samuel Adams six-packs along with the above information. If you live in Virginia or Texas, send $3-- so if you live in Texas, send the index card and three bucks).

I live in Virginia, so I'm kind of screwed, but there's no reason that the rest of you shouldn't benefit from a free glass!

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #158 on: September 22, 2010, 07:52:38 PM »
Bell's Kalamazoo Stout

As I mentioned in this review of three other stouts, American Stouts tend to be a bit more innovative than their English and Irish forebears. Thick, dark, and roasted are three words that pretty much sum up the style. The addition of actual chocolate and coffee complement such tastes that are already present in Stouts. Bell's makes a number of great beers and is quickly becoming one of the most popular microbreweries in America. I particularly enjoy their Two-Hearted Ale. Their Oberon was good as well, but maybe not so appropriate considering that Summer is over.

This stout is one of Bell's year-round offerings. What intrigued me most about it was the fact that it uses licorice in the brewing process; never before have I had a beer with licorice in it. The licorice is gelatin-free, making it safe for all you vegan sots out there.

The cover shows a black-and-white sketch of what really looks a friggin serial killer. Leave it to serial killers to put licorice in their beer. Seriously, it looks like the unibomber with less hair and more anger. Hopefully you won't see me on CNN after I drink this. (Note- according to the website, the label art varies by bottle, but it's all portraits of creepy old men done by a local Michigan artist from what I can tell).


Brewed by:
Bell's Brewery
Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)
Style- American Stout
ABV- 6%

Poured from a 12oz brown bottle with no freshness date.The cover shows a black-and-white sketch of what really looks a friggin serial killer. Leave it to serial killers to put licorice in their beer. Seriously, it looks like the unibomber with less hair and more anger. Hopefully you won't see me on CNN after I drink this. (Note- according to the website, the label art varies by bottle, but it's all portraits of creepy old men done by a local Michigan artist from what I can tell).

Appearance- 3.5 out of 5. This beer is black. Imagine that. It's pretty hard to grade the appearance of stouts since the only distinguishable problem would be that they weren't opaquely-black. The head is a little disappointing, not even one finger, but it's a nice dark brown color.

Smell- 4 out of 5. Most Stouts smell somewhat roasted. This one smells straight up burned-- not in a bad way, mind you. It's just more powerful than usual, reminiscent of the smoke itself instead of just roasted barley. The other high note in the nose is the unusually strong scent of hops, which are often only used in small quantities in Stouts; then again, American brewers love throwing hops into damn near any fermenting brew they can get their hands in. A bit of coffee shows up as well.

Taste-
4 out of 5. The hops aren't nearly as strong in the taste as they are in the smell, but the smokiness remains. With the combination of baking chocolate and a slight tinge of sweetness, it tastes like a Smores cooked over thick wood smoke; I can taste the charred wood in addition to the chocolate. The licorice is rather difficult to distinguish from the other tastes but provides a pleasant undertone. It's definitely not the main flavor, which had concerned me when I initially read the label. The bittersweet aftertaste leaves smoky malt and pine hops, like walking through a forest of smoldering Christmas trees.

Mouthfeel- 4 out of 5. Thick and chewy, like a liquid smores that someone held too long over the flames. Luckily, it goes down smooth.

Drinkability- 3.5 out of 5. I'm a little disappointed that the licorice was mostly lost, but it was otherwise a good beer. It's certainly not a Stout for beginners given how strong the smoke is, but I recommend it for anyone who loves thick, dark, roasted beers. However, two or three would probably fill you up, but that's the case with most Stouts aside from somewhat lighter ones like Guinness Extra Stout (ironic, considering the name).

To be fair, if I didn't like smoky beers, the taste would probably have turned me off. Given my bias, I give it a B.

Note: I realize I'm giving a lot of B's lately; that's not because I'm especially nice, forgiving, or lenient; on the contrary, I simply do a bit of research before I buy beer, so the beer I buy generally tends to be good. However, there may be a few stinkers in next week's line-up (Jimmy Buffet's gimmick beer, for instance)

Bonus mini-review! I'm currently drinking a Marzen from Gordon Biersch to celebrate the Autumnal Equinox. Marzen is the same style as Oktoberfest; the only difference is that it is produced year-round thanks to improved refrigeration techniques. This one was bottled exactly one year ago, on September 22nd, 2009. Happy Birthday, Beer! As for the beer itself, it's good-- not as smooth as some Marzens but still full of malty-sweet goodness. It's orange-- not amber-orange, not yellow-orange, straight up translucent orange, making it a perfect Autumn beer.

Offline Blitzy

  • In a world full of color, I'll always be black and white.
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Jan 2010
  • Location: In the deep dark forest...
  • Gender: Female
  • Howling's Baby
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 13
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #159 on: September 24, 2010, 03:02:57 PM »
Thought you might like this, Para. And all who like beer. :) And neat tricks.

Time Warp - Bottle

Offline Will

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #160 on: September 24, 2010, 07:08:17 PM »
Haha, nice.  I was a little distraught that they were destroying so many beers until they admitted to using water.

Offline Ramster

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #161 on: September 24, 2010, 08:02:57 PM »
Indeed, I sighed with relief when they demonstrated that it was almost impossible with actual beer, thanks to the fountain effect, though! We should have realised when it didn't all spray out when they hit it with a goddamn mallet. But that's what'll happen if you leave the bottle open overnight!

Offline Will

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #162 on: September 24, 2010, 08:05:33 PM »
No doubt!  I am, unfortunately, very familiar with the fountain effect. XD  Just setting a bottle down too hard will do that.

Offline Stormie

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #163 on: September 25, 2010, 01:46:20 AM »
I just want to say my favorite drink is bud light and Cyclone (its bacardi  black rum, blue agave tequila and and a hint of lime)

What is the malted liquor.(beer)
What gets you drunker quicker?
What comes in bottles or in cans?(beer)
Can't get enough of it,(beer)
How we really love it,(beer)
Makes me think I'm a man,(beer)
I can kiss and hug it,(beer)
But I'd rather chug it,(beer)
Fill my belly up to here,(beer)
I could not refuse a,(beer)
I could really use a,(beer)
Beer, beer, beer.

I can't remember how much I have had,
I drank a twelve pack with my dad, BURP!
That's my son the drunken manly stud,
I'm proud to be his bud,
Here have some pretzels,
No!
I'll call it quits,
Those things give me the Schlitz!

Drink with your family,
Drink it with your friends,
Drink till you're fat,
Stomach distends,
Beer is liquid bread it's good for you,
We like to drink till we spew,
EW
Who cares if we get fat,
I'll drink to that,
As we sing once more.

What is the malted liquor,
What gets you drunker quicker,
What comes in bottles or in cans (beer)
Can't get enough of it,(beer)
How we really love it,(beer)
Makes me think I'm a man,(beer)
I can kiss and hug it,(beer)
But I'd rather chug it,(beer)
Fill my belly up to here,(beer)
Golly I adore it,(beer)
Come on dammit pour it,
Do it for me,
Brew it for me,
Feed it to me,
Speed it to me.(beer)

The most wonderful drink in the world.
Hooray

Offline Ramster

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #164 on: September 25, 2010, 06:42:58 AM »
Bud Light? You've missed the point of this thread entirely!

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #165 on: September 25, 2010, 09:10:36 AM »
Bud Light? You've missed the point of this thread entirely!

Aye.  I'm not even a beer-drinker, and I know that's like sex in a canoe.

Offline Saerrael

  • ~~~Seraph ; In love~~~ Do you like what you see? Let me entertain ya ítill you scream.
  • Champion
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Aug 2009
  • Location: You don't know how you took it You just know what you got Oh Lordy you've been stealing from the thieves And you got caught
  • Gender: Male
  • Hold me, thrill me, kiss me, kill me.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 6
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #166 on: September 26, 2010, 07:03:12 PM »
I raise your beer song with another beer song, Stormie.

A long time ago, way back in history,
when all there was to drink was nothin but cups of tea.
Along came a man by the name of Charlie Mops,
and he invented a wonderful drink and he made it out of hops.

He must have been an admiral a sultan or a king,
and to his praises we shall always sing.
Look what he has done for us he's filled us up with cheer!
Lord bless Charlie Mops, the man who invented beer beer beer
tiddly beer beer beer.

The Curtis bar, the James' Pub, the Hole in the Wall as well
one thing you can be sure of, its Charlie's beer they sell
so all ye lads a lasses at eleven O'clock ye stop
for five short seconds, remember Charlie Mops 1 2 3 4 5

A barrel of malt, a bushel of hops, you stir it around with a stick,
the kind of lubrication to make your engine tick.
40 pints of wallop a day will keep away the quacks.
Its only eight pence hapenny and one and six in tax, 1 2 3 4 5

He must have been an admiral a sultan or a king,
and to his praises we shall always sing.
Look what he has done for us he's filled us up with cheer!
Lord bless Charlie Mops, the man who invented beer beer beer
tiddly beer beer beer.

The Lord bless Charlie Mops!



Irish Beer Song

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #167 on: October 01, 2010, 09:18:29 PM »
Although I'm a firm believer in the fact that people should drink whatever makes them happy (take Blitzy, for example), Bud Light is definitely bad form in a thread full of such delicious beer. In an ocean of beer, Bud Light is the BP oil spill. I don't feel like explaining that metaphor, so think about it yourself.

Still, the song wasn't half-bad, so thanks for contributing! Feel free to check out any of the recommendations for something new and exciting.

Great song, Saerra-- it's stuck in my head now.



Anyway, today's beer is Samael's Ale. I've been looking forward to this one for over a month. The girlfriend is out of town, so I finally have time to truly enjoy it.



Brewed by:
Avery Brewing Company
Boulder, Colorado (United States)
Style- Barleywine/ Strong Ale
ABV- 15.82%

Much like the previously-mentioned wheatwine, barleywines are definitely a type of beer despite the misleading name. Bittersweet and strong are hallmark characteristics of barleywines; in fact, they are one of the strongest types of beer currently being brewed. English barleywines, which were the originals, tend to focus on the strong sweet malt flavor, while American varieties often emphasize hops (if these articles have taught you anything, I'm sure it has been the fact that Americans have a disturbing obsession with adding heavy doses of hops to any beer imaginable). The great thing about barleywines and other strong ales with high alcohol contents is that they can be aged  for multiple years like wines. The flavor of a two year-old strong ale is deeper, smoother, and more complex than a nascent bottle of the same brew. This is a style for the true beer enthusiast who has time and willpower enough to set aside beer in a cellar and ignore the temptation to drink it-- a formidable task indeed for such ostensibly delicious beer. Another reason this style is often only enjoyed by hardcore connoisseurs is the prohibitive price-- almost nine dollars for one twelve ounce bottle of this stuff.

Avery Brewing Company is a small brewery that makes big beers. Samael's Ale is in their "Demons of Ale" line-up, which also features the 14.9% abv Belgian Grand Cru-style "The Beast" and the 15.1% abv "Mephistopheles' Stout". According to their website, the brewers threw out all their prior notions of brewing limitations, and they recommend doing the same when tasting this beer. Samael's Ale is aged in oak barrels, much like Scotch whisky. An association with such a fine spirit tempers the spiritual trembling I get at drinking a beer whose namesake is the devil himself-- or maybe that's just anticipation of the beer itself; after all, I have never before had a beer whose alcohol content has been this high. I've fasted for half the day just so I can truly appreciate the tastes that await within the ominous black and red-labeled bottle.

Poured from a 12oz bottle into a thick goblet. Bottled March 2010, batch 6.

Appearance- 5 out of 5. This beer looks incredible. Even in dull light, its moderate amber hue is highlighted by a reddish glow, but when held up the bright light, the liquid explodes with brilliantly deep red color. This beer looks evil, like a rich blood-red ruby glowing with malevolent inner light. I'm almost certain the color was a deciding factor in the naming process! Also, I was surprised by the slightly tan head; it was much thicker and fuller than I had anticipated and almost spilled out of the goblet. Strong carbonation bubbles force their way through the thick yet translucent brew. Unfortunately, the following picture does little to capture the true beauty of the rich red color, but I present it nonetheless as a pale ghost of its true glory:



Smell- 3.5 out of 5. For a beer this strong, I'm disappointed by the weakness of the scents. They aren't lackluster by any means, but neither are they strong enough to do justice to this style. Candy-sugar malt and alcohol dominate the nose along with a whiff of vanilla, which is common in strong beers like this. I detect undertones of fruity esters, like sweet plums and cherries. After a few more sniffs, I've decided this beer is enticing but subtle, much like the suave side of the devil.

Taste- 4.5 out of 5. Honestly, I expected to type something containing an expletive and a number of exclamation marks here, but the beer is amazingly balanced and smooth. It does a remarkable job of disguising the high alcohol content. What alcohol taste there is shows itself to be very reminiscent of whisky. There is a slight burn on the way down, but that is lost in the midst of delicious vanilla and oak that wash over the tongue, followed by sweet malt and dark fruit.  If you dislike sweetness, then you may find this beer a bit cloying. Although Avery says they brew this with Columbus and Fuggels hops, I don't detect them at all. This is definitely more of an English barleywine with emphasis on the malt. It finishes with a lingering, tingling taste of vanilla and nutmeg. Warm alcohol glows all the way down the throat.

Mouthfeel- 4 out of 5. Thick and viscous but not syrupy, this beer carries its balance of tastes into the body. Gulps are possible, but sips are much more satisfying. Never before have I had a beer so thick and yet so smooth, which is incredible considering its monstrous ABV.

Drinkability- 3.5 out of 5. My god, this beer is good. For a beer about which I had heard a lot of stories about not being able to finish it, I am immensely pleased. It went down so easily that I could definitely drink another; however, its drinkability takes a hit from the prohibitive price. Another hit comes from the fact that it's so strong-- two would be enough for almost any beer lover. Anyone trying to get shitfaced should probably just look for a cheaper, more chuggable brew instead of this pedestal-worthy rarity.

Overall, an A-.

This beer has put me in the mood for a glass of Scotch and a cigar, so I'm off to the local bar for a glass of Glenfiddich and a hand-rolled Padron.

Unsolicited advice of the day: Don't drink and smoke-- at least not beforehand and maybe not during. Smoking, even fine cigars and pipe tobacco, scalds your tongue to the point where it cannot properly appreciate the flavors of a good beer or Scotch. Even I admit to being in the mood for a smoke after a few drinks, but make sure you've truly tasted and appreciated what you're drinking before diluting it with tobacco. Sometimes, a good cigar can enhance the flavor of a spirit, but it's best to taste your drink unadulterated first.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 07:13:20 PM by Paradox »

Offline Blitzy

  • In a world full of color, I'll always be black and white.
  • Dame
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Jan 2010
  • Location: In the deep dark forest...
  • Gender: Female
  • Howling's Baby
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 13
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #168 on: October 01, 2010, 09:20:44 PM »
That beer is gorgeous, Para. o_o Really. It doesn't look like beer at all.

Offline Saerrael

  • ~~~Seraph ; In love~~~ Do you like what you see? Let me entertain ya ítill you scream.
  • Champion
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Aug 2009
  • Location: You don't know how you took it You just know what you got Oh Lordy you've been stealing from the thieves And you got caught
  • Gender: Male
  • Hold me, thrill me, kiss me, kill me.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 6
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #169 on: October 01, 2010, 09:26:42 PM »


Great song, Saerra-- it's stuck in my head now.



You can blame a game by the name of The Bard for that song. It's been stuck ever since I played it. Honestly, I find the game version to be better then the original. It's flow is better.
Or maybe I'm just too much of a gamer... ;)

[noembed]Link to the game's song[/noembed]

Offline Will

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #170 on: October 01, 2010, 09:41:23 PM »
That beer is gorgeous, Para. o_o Really. It doesn't look like beer at all.
[/quote

Agreed.  It's beautiful!  And the description makes me very curious to try it.  Yet another to keep an eye out for.  -_-

Barleywines are interesting; it's a little strange to feel sticky lips after finishing a beer. O.o  I've concluded that I just can't drink more than one in a sitting.  I have to drink them rather quickly as well, or the malt sweetness will become overpowering as it warms, and then I just can't take it.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #171 on: October 01, 2010, 10:13:14 PM »
That beer is gorgeous, Para. o_o Really. It doesn't look like beer at all.

I agree.  I might even give it a try, assuming it can be found near the 50-horse town I call home.  (I'm not kidding.  They leave me presents for the garden.)

Offline finewine

  • Insatiable
  • Dame
  • Bacchae
  • *
  • Join Date: Aug 2010
  • Location: Somewhere in the reflection of your eyes
  • Gender: Female
  • 21st century man is conquered by seduction.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #172 on: October 03, 2010, 03:28:32 PM »
This blog is a wealth of information and fun.  I enjoy viewing the videos, reading the links, and trying the new beers suggested on this blog whenever I can find them.

Cheers,
FW

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #173 on: October 03, 2010, 07:11:51 PM »
Thanks FW! Do you have any in particular that you tried because of this blog and liked?

By the way, everyone, I feel a bit stupid; I totally forgot to put the introduction into the review, so here it is, better late than never:

"Much like the previously-mentioned wheatwine, barleywines are definitely a type of beer despite the misleading name. Bittersweet and strong are hallmark characteristics of barleywines; in fact, they are one of the strongest types of beer currently being brewed. English barleywines, which were the originals, tend to focus on the strong sweet malt flavor, while American varieties often emphasize hops (if these articles have taught you anything, I'm sure it has been the fact that Americans have a disturbing obsession with adding heavy doses of hops to any beer imaginable). The great thing about barleywines and other strong ales with high alcohol contents is that they can be aged  for multiple years like wines. The flavor of a two year-old strong ale is deeper, smoother, and more complex than a nascent bottle of the same brew. This is a style for the true beer enthusiast who has time and willpower enough to set aside beer in a cellar and ignore the temptation to drink it-- a formidable task indeed for such ostensibly delicious beer. Another reason this style is often only enjoyed by hardcore connoisseurs is the prohibitive price-- almost nine dollars for one twelve ounce bottle of this stuff.

Avery Brewing Company is a small brewery that makes big beers. Samael's Ale is in their "Demons of Ale" line-up, which also features the 14.9% abv Belgian Grand Cru-style "The Beast" and the 15.1% abv "Mephistopheles' Stout". According to their website, the brewers threw out all their prior notions of brewing limitations, and they recommend doing the same when tasting this beer. Samael's Ale is aged in oak barrels, much like Scotch whisky. An association with such a fine spirit tempers the spiritual trembling I get at drinking a beer whose namesake is the devil himself-- or maybe that's just anticipation of the beer itself; after all, I have never before had a beer whose alcohol content has been this high. I've fasted for half the day just so I can truly appreciate the tastes that await within the ominous black and red-labeled bottle."

Offline ParadoxTopic starter

Re: Beer Blog
« Reply #174 on: October 10, 2010, 07:02:55 PM »
I'll have another review up soon, but I just wanted to gloat share some good news. The Examiner gig is paying off-- the owner of a soon-to-be-opened craft beer bar in the area just emailed me with a heads-up and a personal invitation to come drink with/talk to him. Granted, he just wants some publicity for the new place, but I'm more than willing to write an article in exchange for beer.

Edit: Just to clarify, I have been drinking. It's just that bars and parties aren't the best environment in which to conduct a proper review; however, I can tell you that Samuel Adams, Ayinger, and Paulaner have the best three Oktoberfest-Marzens currently on the market. Pick one up and let me know what you think!