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Author Topic: Fun Academic Articles and Findings  (Read 8449 times)

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Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #75 on: April 04, 2019, 05:53:23 AM »
This is not exactly a finding, but more of a hype. Next week on April 10th the first ever pictures captured of a black hole will be released! Exciting stuff. My horror and scifi muse is already tingling.

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #76 on: April 05, 2019, 02:22:32 AM »
A fascinating TED talk about public space and civic life. Focused on America, but the insights are for everyone.

https://www.ted.com/talks/james_howard_kunstler_dissects_suburbia

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #77 on: April 09, 2019, 10:25:21 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #78 on: April 10, 2019, 09:15:54 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2019, 06:43:51 PM »
That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Very cool, Sain! Thank you for sharing.

And for those who are curious as to why the image is so
blurry
, it's actually one of the highest resolution images ever taken. The EHT (Event Horizon Telescope) collected approximately 1000 disks and 5 petabytes of data, which is equivalent to "all of the selfies that 40,000 people will take in their lifetime." Plus, the black hole is 55 million light years away. [Article]


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #80 on: April 14, 2019, 05:13:47 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #81 on: April 14, 2019, 05:31:50 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Ooooh, need to read this one later. It's really cool to see the new CRISPR version coming up and the toolkit expanding.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #82 on: April 17, 2019, 06:22:27 PM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]


Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #83 on: April 18, 2019, 05:03:37 AM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]

Thank you for sharing Argyros! Seems to be still ten years away from usable according to the scientists, but nonetheless impressive. Remember chatting with someone who was trying to make kidneys and getting the cells into proper organ shape and having them stay in it is for sure one of the biggest challenges for any organ 3D printing. Now getting them to work properly after it is another hurdle, but I would assume maybe that's something they can do with hormone or chemical treaments now that the cells are where they should be. Definitely interesting to follow the process of this field. And relaxing since you only have to check news every year or so to keep up with them ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #84 on: April 21, 2019, 04:03:16 PM »
The human memory contains a special protein known as Arc that behaves like a virus, neuroscientists say. Now, the article is erroneously titled as our memory doesn't come from a virus, rather that it acts like one. Just something to remember (/pun). [Article]


Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #85 on: April 25, 2019, 02:30:58 AM »
The human memory contains a special protein known as Arc that behaves like a virus, neuroscientists say. Now, the article is erroneously titled as our memory doesn't come from a virus, rather that it acts like one. Just something to remember (/pun). [Article]



Damn that was a fun read ;D Cool in so many ways. Just them suggesting that viruses played a bigger role in evolutionary process than we imagined is something crazy. This is such inspiring fuel for scifi stories. I can see plots about some species seeding certain key-evolutionary viruses on a planet with simpler life forms to uplift them into something more sentient. And even cyberpunky stuff where we don't do gene-engineering but viral engineer something new into people. This screams "write me!" Heh.



There's new evidence showing that parents getting a child less than three years prior to marriage (which here is used as a marker of when they start to have sex I suppose) may increase the risk of their first born getting schizophrenia. [article] [research paper] This was so wacky and weird, but the paper looks pretty legit as well. The reason they provided was that it'd take some time for the mother's immune system to get used to the father's sperm. It sorta makes sense in the common sense kinda way too, and it's fun to think about whether or not the amount of sex parents have might also affect that immune response (given the mother's increased contact with the sticky stuff).

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #86 on: April 25, 2019, 11:26:40 AM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms could reveal the key to reducing pesticide use worldwide. [Article] [Publication]

I have actually done research on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) previously, including gene splicing recombinant pre-mRNA, gene modification, transgenesis and cisgenesis. The last methodology is the locus of the research study, where scientists are studying how the genotype for glandular trichome–synthesized acylated sugars (“acylsugars”) can be assimilated into Solanum lycopersicum cvs. to help reduce pesticide use in not just tomatoes, but other agricultural crops as well.

The use of genetic engineering in botanical specimens is a delicate, finite process and presents unique challenges in agriculture. Ethical reasons, certainly. But moreover, toxicity. Improper cisgenesis may inadvertently increase or reactivate latent metabolic pathways in cultivated specimens whose wild antecedents procured chemical toxins or alkaloids, which can result in enzymatic activation or inhibition of these compounds. Examples include protease inhibitors (legumes), cyanogens (cassava and lima beans), goitrogens (canola), pressor amines (bananas) and solanine (nightshades). The predominant concern of failed cisgenesis in genetically engineered foods is the negative effect on humans if these toxic compounds are ingested in high volumes. For example, α-solanine in potatoes inhibits the neurotransmitter enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which can impair nervous system functionality to a similar degree as organophosphates or carbamates.

It’s food for thought (/pun).

Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #87 on: April 25, 2019, 11:37:50 AM »
There's new evidence showing that parents getting a child less than three years prior to marriage (which here is used as a marker of when they start to have sex I suppose) may increase the risk of their first born getting schizophrenia. [article] [research paper] This was so wacky and weird, but the paper looks pretty legit as well. The reason they provided was that it'd take some time for the mother's immune system to get used to the father's sperm. It sorta makes sense in the common sense kinda way too, and it's fun to think about whether or not the amount of sex parents have might also affect that immune response (given the mother's increased contact with the sticky stuff).

So, the takeaway here is to have a lot of sex before trying to conceive?  (And I hope they meant three years after marriage.)

Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #88 on: April 25, 2019, 01:34:03 PM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms could reveal the key to reducing pesticide use worldwide. [Article] [Publication]

I have actually done research on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) previously, including gene splicing recombinant pre-mRNA, gene modification, transgenesis and cisgenesis. The last methodology is the locus of the research study, where scientists are studying how the genotype for glandular trichome–synthesized acylated sugars (“acylsugars”) can be assimilated into Solanum lycopersicum cvs. to help reduce pesticide use in not just tomatoes, but other agricultural crops as well.

The use of genetic engineering in botanical specimens is a delicate, finite process and presents unique challenges in agriculture. Ethical reasons, certainly. But moreover, toxicity. Improper cisgenesis may inadvertently increase or reactivate latent metabolic pathways in cultivated specimens whose wild antecedents procured chemical toxins or alkaloids, which can result in enzymatic activation or inhibition of these compounds. Examples include protease inhibitors (legumes), cyanogens (cassava and lima beans), goitrogens (canola), pressor amines (bananas) and solanine (nightshades). The predominant concern of failed cisgenesis in genetically engineered foods is the negative effect on humans if these toxic compounds are ingested in high volumes. For example, α-solanine in potatoes inhibits the neurotransmitter enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which can impair nervous system functionality to a similar degree as organophosphates or carbamates.

It’s food for thought (/pun).

Oh, that's really interesting to hear from someone who's worked with plants. I've found gene-engineering plants a super cool topic forever, though never got beyond the surface of the "damn this is cool" ;D. It's interesting to hear about all the little details regarding them. Some neat things that I'll definitely pepper in my scifi stories later on.

So, the takeaway here is to have a lot of sex before trying to conceive?  (And I hope they meant three years after marriage.)

Yes. Fuck lots and without condom before trying to make a baby.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #89 on: April 25, 2019, 02:05:30 PM »
I've found gene-engineering plants a super cool topic [...]

Agreed

Offline Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #90 on: April 25, 2019, 10:37:43 PM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms [...]

It explains so much!


Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #91 on: April 27, 2019, 04:41:36 PM »
Oh, a friend shared this to me last week, I forgot to share it here. It's not really an academic finding per-se, but I did stumble upon it during a seminar lecture while not listening to it so heh, sorta found it in academic context at least! Anyway, the map shows CO2 emissions and electricity productions of each country that tracks their data. Really cool way to get some context to different methods of energy production since many people seem to be kinda fuzzy on those and perhaps sometimes put a little too much trust on wind/solar as the solutions of the coming century.

https://www.electricitymap.org/?page=country&solar=false&remote=true&wind=false&countryCode=FI

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #92 on: April 27, 2019, 06:21:12 PM »
Oh, a friend shared this to me last week, I forgot to share it here. It's not really an academic finding per-se, but I did stumble upon it during a seminar lecture while not listening to it so heh, sorta found it in academic context at least! Anyway, the map shows CO2 emissions and electricity productions of each country that tracks their data. Really cool way to get some context to different methods of energy production since many people seem to be kinda fuzzy on those and perhaps sometimes put a little too much trust on wind/solar as the solutions of the coming century.

https://www.electricitymap.org/?page=country&solar=false&remote=true&wind=false&countryCode=FI

Thank you very much for sharing, Sain! I really enjoyed exploring the features of this map, and visualizing how each type of energy production correlated to CO2 emissions in each country.

On a similar TAN, I would like to share an online resource tool that was used as a reference in my hydrology courses. Aqueduct is an interactive map database for water risk analysis based on a conjunction of industrial, hydrological and climatological variables. Examples of variables include baseline water stress, groundwater stress, drought severity, upstream storage and flood occurrence. Aqueduct is so comprehensive that it can actually determine water risk analysis for threatened species of amphibians in freshwater ecosystems. How cool is that?!

Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #93 on: April 28, 2019, 03:23:22 AM »
Thank you very much for sharing, Sain! I really enjoyed exploring the features of this map, and visualizing how each type of energy production correlated to CO2 emissions in each country.

On a similar TAN, I would like to share an online resource tool that was used as a reference in my hydrology courses. Aqueduct is an interactive map database for water risk analysis based on a conjunction of industrial, hydrological and climatological variables. Examples of variables include baseline water stress, groundwater stress, drought severity, upstream storage and flood occurrence. Aqueduct is so comprehensive that it can actually determine water risk analysis for threatened species of amphibians in freshwater ecosystems. How cool is that?!

That's pretty cool. Neat that it has options for different industries as well ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #94 on: April 30, 2019, 06:00:33 PM »
In anthropology news, scientists have allegedly discovered the oldest footprint to ever be found in the Americas, dating back approximately 15,600 years. [Article] [Publication]

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #95 on: May 05, 2019, 01:00:17 PM »
Wolves are more inclined to help each other than domesticated dogs, according to an experiment done by behavioural researchers at the Wolf Science Center in Vienna, Austria. [Article] [Publication]




Figure 1. The researchers trained nine wolves and six dogs to interact with a “giving” symbol on this touchscreen, which would then dispense a treat to their partner in an adjacent room. © Rachel Dale, Wolf Science Center, 2019.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #96 on: May 08, 2019, 07:09:38 PM »
Researchers from the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote¹ for the venom of the Australian Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), considered by many to be the most lethal species of jellyfish in the world. [Article] [Publication]




Figure 1. The Australian Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), or "Sea Wasp". © Jamie Seymour



¹ – While the antidote has been scientifically proven to block pain, scarring and necrosis of the epidermis, it is unclear as to whether it can prevent more serious symptoms of envenomation, such as hyperkalemia or cardiac arrest.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #97 on: May 14, 2019, 06:31:33 PM »
Researchers from Washington State University have developed a viable, ecological alternative to Styrofoam. The foam is predominantly constructed from nanocrystal cellulose, which is not only an excellent insulator but is also very lightweight and can support up to 200 times its own weight without altering its original shape. The manufacturing process is also simple and environmentally friendly, using water as a solvent instead of chemicals. [Article] [Publication]

Offline SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #98 on: May 15, 2019, 03:38:55 AM »
Researchers from Washington State University have developed a viable, ecological alternative to Styrofoam. The foam is predominantly constructed from nanocrystal cellulose, which is not only an excellent insulator but is also very lightweight and can support up to 200 times its own weight without altering its original shape. The manufacturing process is also simple and environmentally friendly, using water as a solvent instead of chemicals. [Article] [Publication]

That is quite cool. Nano cellulose is a big hype thing over here too given Finland's dependence on forestry. Always exciting to see people come up with new natural materials.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #99 on: May 15, 2019, 05:17:44 PM »
That is quite cool. Nano cellulose is a big hype thing over here too given Finland's dependence on forestry. Always exciting to see people come up with new natural materials.

I am excited to see what they come up with next!