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Author Topic: Forgotten Words  (Read 10480 times)

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Online Sain

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #175 on: May 15, 2019, 05:11:23 AM »
Thanks for keeping the curiosities going while Justric is taking a break Argyros. They're fun to check.

I want to see people constructing sentences with over 50% of the words picked from this thread ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #176 on: May 15, 2019, 05:44:36 PM »
Thanks for keeping the curiosities going while Justric is taking a break Argyros. They're fun to check.

You're welcome, Sain! My pleasure.

I want to see people constructing sentences with over 50% of the words picked from this thread ;D

Doth thou foreshadow a contest?  ;)


Online Sain

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #177 on: May 16, 2019, 03:38:30 AM »
You're welcome, Sain! My pleasure.

Doth thou foreshadow a contest?  ;)

A forgotten challenge ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #178 on: May 20, 2019, 08:24:38 PM »
Venery





[ ven·​ery | ve-nə-rē | ven-uh-ree ]




noun

  • The art, act, practice or sport of hunting; the chase.
  • Animals that are hunted; game.



Etymology

Venery (c. 1275–1325). From Middle English venerie, borrowed from Anglo-French vénerie ("hunting") and derived from Old French vener and Latin vēnārī ("to hunt").

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #179 on: May 30, 2019, 06:54:02 PM »
Dandiprat


[ dan·​di·​prat | dandēˌprat | dan-dee-prat]



noun1

  • A small silver coin minted in 16th Century England, valued at approximately twopence.

noun2

  • A person of diminutive stature; a dwarf, pygmy, or midget.
  • A silly, finicky, contemptible or puerile person.
  • A child, especially a street urchin.



Etymology

Dandiprat (c. 1510–1520). Origin unknown.

Online Sain

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #180 on: May 31, 2019, 02:41:23 AM »
Dandiprat


[ dan·​di·​prat | dandēˌprat | dan-dee-prat]



noun1

  • A small silver coin minted in 16th Century England, valued at approximately twopence.

noun2

  • A person of diminutive stature; a dwarf, pygmy, or midget.
  • A silly, finicky, contemptible or puerile person.
  • A child, especially a street urchin.



Etymology

Dandiprat (c. 1510–1520). Origin unknown.

I like this. The word actually sounds sorta like what it means so it might be usable today still ;D

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #181 on: June 06, 2019, 02:37:57 PM »

Scurryfunge

Verb
  • sku-ree-fun-j
  • Hasty tidying of the house between the time you see a neighbor and the time they knock on your door.

Old/Middle English, commonly in the late 19th century.

First documented use:

1777 - Horæ Subsecivæ (in English Dialect Dictionary);
"SCURRIFUNGE - to lash tightly; coire"

Example:

"I scurryfunge when I see my mother in law coming over."

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #182 on: June 06, 2019, 09:58:19 PM »
Purfle

[ pur·​fle | pər-fəl | pur-fuh l ]





verb (purfled, purfling)

  • To finish an object with an ornamental border.
  • To decorate a shrine or tabernacle with architectural forms in miniature.

noun (alt. purfling)

  • An ornamental border, as the inlaid border near the outer edge of the table and back of a stringed instrument.



Etymology

Purfle (c. 1275–1325). From Middle English purfilen and French porfiler ("to adorn a border"), equivalent to por- ("in favour of") + filer ("to spin"), derivative of Latin filium ("thread").

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #183 on: June 10, 2019, 07:26:22 PM »
Shrift



[ shrift | srift ]


noun

  • Absolution or remission of sins granted after confession and penance.
  • (Religion) The act of shriving; confession.



Etymology

Shrift (c. < 900 AD). Middle English shrift, derived from Old English scrift ("penance") and cognate with German or Dutch schrift ("writing").

Offline Mellific

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #184 on: June 12, 2019, 08:29:52 PM »
Maffle

Verb
  • to speak indistinctly : MUMBLE, STAMMER
  • to cause to become confused or bewildered

Middle English mafflen, probably of imitative origin

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #185 on: June 16, 2019, 01:40:54 PM »
Agelast





[ ag·​e·​last | a-jə-ˌlast]


noun

  • A person who never laughs.



Etymology

Agelast (c. 1877). Borrowed from Middle French agelaste, a derivative of Greek agélastos ("not laughing", "grave", "gloomy"),
which is a conjunction of a- ("not", "without") + gelastós, verbal adjective of gelân ("to laugh").

Offline Mellific

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #186 on: June 16, 2019, 07:04:12 PM »
Tortiloquy

Noun
  • Crooked or dishonest speech.

Sample sentence: I will not tolerate such tortiloquy in my court!

1656 -1656

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #187 on: June 20, 2019, 07:18:18 PM »
Nithing





[ nith·​ing | naɪðɪŋ ]



noun (pl. nithings)

  • A contemptible, despicable, meanly, covetous or stingy person; a miser.
  • A cowardly or craven person, especially one who breaks a code of honour.
  • (Mythology) A malicious creature.


Etymology

Nithing (c. 1731, Middle English). From Old English nīþing ("wretch", "villain", "coward", "outlaw") and Old Norse níðingr, derived from the root word níð ("defamation", "libel").

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #188 on: September 22, 2019, 04:17:02 PM »
Boulevardier





“Feeling fancy, might buy a house
made of gold later. I don’t know.”



[ bou·le·vard·i·er | bu̇-lə-ˌvär-ˈdyā | booluh-var-dyey ]



noun (pl. boulevardiers)
  • A cultivated, cultured person who frequents the most fashionable locales in cities such as Pairs, London or New York; a wealthy, fashionable socialite.
  • A person who lives luxuriously and enjoys good food and drink; a bon vivant.
  • (Mixology) A cocktail consisting of Campari, sweet vermouth, and rye whisky or bourbon.


Etymology

Boulevardier (c. 1875–1880). From French boulevard (“promenade, avenue, rampart”) + the noun-forming suffix -ier.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2019, 04:36:38 PM by Argyros »

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #189 on: September 29, 2019, 06:56:02 PM »
Pavonine




[ pav·​o·​nine | ˈpavəˌnīn, -nə̇n | pav-uh-nahyn, -nin ]



adjective
  • Of, relating to, or resembling a peacock.
  • Coloured like a peacock's tail or neck; iridescent.
  • Of the colour peacock blue.


Etymology

Pavonine (c. 1650–1660). From Latin pāvōnīnus, derivative of pāvō (stem pāvōn-) ("peacock") + suffix adjective -ine (of, or pertaining to).

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #190 on: October 10, 2019, 09:44:49 PM »
Cupreous




[ cu·​pre·​ous | ˈk(y)üprēəs | kyoo-pree-uh s, (koo-) ]



adjective
  • Containing or resembling copper: coppery.
  • Copper-coloured; metallic reddish-brown.


Etymology

Cupreous (c. 1660–1670). From Late Latin cupreus, equivalent to cupr(um) ("copper") + the suffix forming adjective -eus or -eous ("relating to or having the nature of").

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #191 on: October 19, 2019, 10:13:47 AM »
Anfractuous




[an·frac·tu·ous | an-ˈfrak-chə-wəs  (-shə-; -chü-əs, -shü-) | an-frak-choo-uh s]



adjective
  • Characterized by windings and turnings; sinuous, circuitous, torturous.


Etymology

Anfractuous (c. 1615–1625). From Latin anfractus (“winding”, “bending”), a combination of the prefix an- (“around”) and the verb frangere (“to bend”, “to break.”).

Offline Argyros

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #192 on: October 26, 2019, 12:13:04 PM »
Deracinate




[de·rac·i·nate | dē-ˈra-sə-ˌnāt | dih-ras-uh-neyt]



verb (used with an object) deracinated, deracinating
  • To pull up by the roots; uproot, extirpate, eradicate.
  • To isolate or alienate a person from a native or customary culture or environment.


Etymology

Deracinate (c. 1590–1600). From French verb déracin(er), a combinative derivative of prefix de- (“remove”, “separate”) + Latin noun radix (“root”) + the verb-forming suffix –ate.