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Author Topic: Fun Academic Articles and Findings  (Read 16599 times)

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Online SainTopic starter

Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« on: December 19, 2017, 04:06:00 PM »
This was pretty interesting for everyone RPeing with faceclaims ;D

https://techxplore.com/news/2017-10-neural-networks-result-photorealistic.html
When two competing neural networks result in photorealistic face


Potential for infinite face claims with desired features on demand coming soon?

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2017, 05:33:19 PM »
The article was an interesting, technical read.  However, at this time, the software is creating faces from a catalogue of celebrity faces, so they are amalgamations of numerous parts of real people's visages, not completely new faces.  I wonder when the software will be able to do what talented artists do, and create a new face.  Although--to be fair, artists, when creating a face from their 'imagination', are probably building from a prior knowledge of faces they have already seen, as well.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2018, 02:54:07 PM »
https://anu.prezly.com/redefining-knowledge-of-elderly-people-throughout-history#


This was quite interesting. Leaves a very odd feeling if life span has actually stayed pretty much the same. Definitely need to adjust my fantasy settings according to this...

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2018, 12:14:27 PM »


Original article: https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.10433

Damn these deep mind solutions keep being amazing as well as does the pace at which they're adapted ;D!

Offline RedRose

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2018, 01:25:42 PM »
https://anu.prezly.com/redefining-knowledge-of-elderly-people-throughout-history#


This was quite interesting. Leaves a very odd feeling if life span has actually stayed pretty much the same. Definitely need to adjust my fantasy settings according to this...

That's a topic I love. I never believed the 40 year thing. But 70? I don't know. That does sound high, especially in poor circles, but even richer ones. Maybe if you count only people who do reach adult age. Because yeah, many didn't make it to puberty.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2018, 04:36:51 AM »
Yeah, most likely dying early and in poor conditions was very common back then.

Here's another interesting read regarding aging from Nature.

Colossal family tree reveals environment's influence on lifespan

If nothing else I'd say that's great motivation to keep a healthy lifestyle, when very little of it can be blamed on genetics :-)

Offline RedRose

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2018, 01:16:53 PM »
Fascinating! I love genealogy, grew up on our family tree' stories.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2018, 05:11:49 AM »
I find this also absolutely fascinating. Imagination starts to race when you think about what sort of world it must have been with proper different races and such in stone age. It's like we once had a fantasy setting here on Earth. Maybe there were more than just neandrenthals and denisovans. Who knows how many there were?


Modern humans interbred with Denisovans twice in history

More at: https://phys.org/news/2018-03-modern-humans-interbred-denisovans-history.html

Offline Ket

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2018, 05:28:45 AM »
https://anu.prezly.com/redefining-knowledge-of-elderly-people-throughout-history#


This was quite interesting. Leaves a very odd feeling if life span has actually stayed pretty much the same. Definitely need to adjust my fantasy settings according to this...

The reason they say that the average lifespan during X time period was Y number of years is that they are factoring in infant/child mortality. Those rates were tremendously higher in the past than they are in these days of modern medicine. So, if you've got half your population dying before age 2, and half your population dying around age 70, you're still going to have an average lifespan of 35 years.

If you change the population you're looking at, and average the lifespan of a population who made it past a certain age, then the number will change.

Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2018, 04:09:38 PM »
Yale offers 'The Science of Wellbeing' for free.

'Psychology and cognitive science professor Laurie Santos teaches the course. In it, she covers the science behind positive psychology and behavioral change. Students are required to embark on a self-improvement project throughout the course.'

Thought this might be interesting and useful.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2018, 08:41:12 AM »
New ant species from Borneo explodes to defend its colony



https://phys.org/news/2018-04-ant-species-borneo-defend-colony.html

Summary: Exploding ants. Banelings are real. BANELINGS ARE REAL?! Nature is mad and amazing.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2018, 08:53:17 AM »
Genetic adaptations to diving discovered in humans for the first time



https://phys.org/news/2018-04-genetic-humans.html

Couple thousand years and humans have evolved larger spleens to dive?! How nutty is that. Seems like straight out of fantasy. Gonna be more liberal with regional evolutions to my fantasy races too.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2018, 08:58:45 AM by Sain »

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2018, 08:55:51 AM »
Optogenetic study shows that male flies find ejaculation pleasurable



https://phys.org/news/2018-04-optogenetic-male-flies-ejaculation-pleasurable.html

So flies and other very simple creatures actually enjoy sex, possibly even in a very similar manner as humans. Quite amazing stuff. Definitely a thing to consider when writing scifi. Perhaps feeling pleasure from reproduction is a must have for complex organisms to evolve ::)

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2018, 03:19:08 AM »
Stephen Hawking's last paper was just published today.

I actually feel a bit sad for what he is proposing. Thinking that universe was infinite had certain romantic charm.

e. The video in that article is rreally really interesting. I recommend listening to it.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2018, 03:23:41 AM by Sain »

Online midnightblack

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2018, 11:38:08 PM »
Cosmology is certainly the definitive field of thought-provoking and moving ideas. Fractal multiverses than span out into eternity, the false vacuum that decays, annihilating all existence and so forth. However, I've grown to regard most of this stuff as a kind of pseudo-physics, as it isn't really falsifiable. Sure, it's quite a commanding display of mathematics mixed with lofty implications regarding space and time, but somehow it always fails to deliver a prediction that can be objectively tested.

About a century ago, Einstein's own ideas seemed just as weird to the scientific community, but he always found a way to put them to a simple test. His work on general relativity ultimately came up with a pretty basic prediction: the trajectory of a light ray curves in the vicinity of massive objects. Long story short, one solar eclipse and a crazy astronomer later, and poof, the theory was tested and turned out to be true.

Offline Heathcliff Moors

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2018, 01:51:20 AM »
My fave is a scientific body down here in Australia that did a study on why people eat fast food. Ok.. the result is ground breaking - Because we like it. That is the actual the result. They could have given me half the amount of funding and I would have told them the same thing in less time.

Offline RedRose

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2018, 03:54:37 AM »
That, and it's cheap and convenient. French people are crazy about McDonald's.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2018, 05:25:27 AM »
There can be surprising side costs for making even a simple study like that in a manner that would satisfy the scientific community. It's also good to often go to the original article after seeing the press release versions. Sometimes the subject of the study may have been very different from what is later reported in the more public media :P

No super fun articles this week alas, or I may have missed some...

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2018, 03:39:10 AM »
Researchers ask Americans 'What does God look like?'

"God's perceived face, based on the aggregated responses of surveyed American Christians. Credit: Joshua Jackson et al"
Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-06-americans-god.html#jCp

This I thought really cool ;D Now that'd be a writing prompt if you had a plot with the researcher meeting said God. Would be really fun to see results of similar thing from a global set.

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2018, 08:12:42 AM »
This has to be the most awesome "backup hard drive" technology ever. Current size: 360 TB - projected lifespan even in an environment a bit hotter than Earth: same as the age of the universe.  :D (in room temoerature, it would last much longer than that)

And what an amazing funky name! :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superman_memory_crystal

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2018, 08:39:33 AM »
This has to be the most awesome "backup hard drive" technology ever. Current size: 360 TB - projected lifespan even in an environment a bit hotter than Earth: same as the age of the universe.  :D (in room temoerature, it would last much longer than that)

And what an amazing funky name! :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superman_memory_crystal

That's really cool. I wonder how the research has progressed on that since 2010.

Offline RedRose

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2018, 04:21:42 AM »
https://www.psypost.org/2018/07/study-finds-women-including-feminists-attracted-benevolently-sexist-men-51693
Very interesting. I am biased as I am generally attracted to very old school type but I definitely know girls who do NOT want someone to help them put on their coat or invite them, so I don't know.

https://www.psypost.org/2013/10/self-entitled-women-are-more-likely-to-endorse-benevolent-sexism-study-finds-20644

lol that made me laugh. I do see how it can feel entitled.

Online midnightblack

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2018, 03:04:57 PM »
Maybe not exactly academic, but certainly one of the most unsettling uses of an oscilloscope that I've yet to see.  ::)

And it fits the NIИ soundtrack so disturbingly well. The stuff of bad dreams. shivers
 

Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2018, 03:41:23 PM »
Oh - Quake the FPS!  Here I was thinking someone captured an earthquake on an oscilloscope.  (I was wondering how the sine waves in the thumbnail could have gone that chaotic.)

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #24 on: July 25, 2018, 05:49:22 PM »
Read last month about someone who had launched the inventive project of collecting people's night dreams in the Third Reich - she interviewed friends and casual acquaintances and asked them to share some of their dreams or even write them down.  Eventually, after the war, she put out a book. The most intriguing example cited by the guy who was writing about that book (sorry, can't retrieve the article now) was about an ordinary Joe - not a Nazi sympathizer, but not an activist against them either, and not a Jew, gay man or any similar "target group" - who dreamt that one day at work, no less a bigwig than Goebbels showed up. Of course like everybody else, our man greeted him and gave a Nazi salute - BUT the weird twist: Goebbels offers no response, he silently refuses to acknowledge the greeting. Whenever his gaze reaches the man again, it's either a cold, blank stare or a vaguely menacing look, as if saying "there is something wrong with you and I've noticed; don't think you will get away with this!".  ::)
« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 06:05:52 PM by gaggedLouise »

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2018, 02:53:38 AM »

Offline CopperLily

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2018, 01:28:35 PM »
There can be surprising side costs for making even a simple study like that in a manner that would satisfy the scientific community. It's also good to often go to the original article after seeing the press release versions. Sometimes the subject of the study may have been very different from what is later reported in the more public media :P

As a working scientist, all of these things.

- "I'm pretty sure I know this" is different from "We have an exact measure of this"
- Science is *expensive*
- Public reporting on science is...not good. And often only mildly related to what the paper says.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2018, 03:34:49 PM »
God damn AI gets better fast...


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2018, 12:03:59 PM »
Yep. Even for Cyberpunk stories it's rare to see this wild applications of AI. Kind of inspiring ;D Really wanna write near-future scifi with modern AI (neural network based) technology sometime.


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2018, 09:45:41 AM »
I suppose this would fit the thread too.

Just look at it go ;D


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #30 on: December 11, 2018, 03:42:58 PM »
Damn this is awesome. AI just keeps improving at an insane rate.


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2018, 01:24:17 PM »
O my god. You can download this algorithm here and try it yourself. Gonna need to play around with it tomorrow and see what's up. It looks AWESOME!



e. If anyone more code-savvy wants to help me get it to work so I can play around please explain what the instructions actually mean ;D
« Last Edit: December 15, 2018, 01:30:29 PM by Sain »

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #32 on: December 23, 2018, 05:04:24 PM »
Old news, but good news for phylogenetics:

Lax, G., Eglit, Y., Eme, L., Bertrand, E. M., Roger, A. J. & Simpson, A. G. B. (2018). Hemimastigophora is a novel supra-kingdom-level lineage of eukaryotes. Nature 564, 410-414. doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0708-8



Meh, tardigrades are cuter.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #33 on: December 24, 2018, 01:40:39 AM »
Ooh, that looks cool. Will need to take a read. Even old news is often new news since we all follow different fields ;D! So feel free to share more if you have!

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #34 on: December 28, 2018, 12:21:14 PM »
DNA Barcoding is a type of scientific technology predominantly utilized in phylogenetics and taxonomy, yet is expanding into other fields of science such as ecology, agriculture, horticulture, forestry and – as it states in this article – aquaculture. In particular, legislation pertaining to the fishing and seafood industries can be vastly improved by the implementation of DNA barcoding to identify vulnerable and endangered species to keep them in the ocean and off the market.

Wainwright, B. J., Ip, Y. C. A., Neo, M. L., Chang, J. J. M, Gan, C. Z., Clark-Shen, N., Huang, D. & Rao, M. (2018). DNA barcoding of traded shark fins, meat and mobulid gill plates in Singapore uncovers numerous threatened species. Conservation Genetics, 19(6), 1393–1399. doi.org/10.1007/s10592-018-1108-1


Now, DNA extraction for species identification in raw products is nothing new and has been done several times before. However, DNA barcoding is substantially faster and more accessible (not as accurate, since it's only the mtDNA, but pretty reliable nonetheless), so it's exciting to surmise that this type of novel technology can be utilized more frequently for stricter regulation of commercial imports and exports.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2019, 12:29:48 AM »
In 2018, Kew scientists, researchers and partners discovered 172 new botanical species (128 tracheophytes*, 44 fungi) from deserts, rainforests, woodlands and mountains around the world. You can check out the featured species in this article.



Figure 1. The newly discovered Talbotiella cheekii in Guinea. T. cheekii is a member of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae) and grows to over 24 metres (~79 ft) in height and 83 cm (~33 in) in diameter. © Kew, 2018.

* – Vascular plants.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2019, 03:04:47 AM »
That tree looks so cool. Like some fantasy species ;D

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2019, 03:51:50 AM »
This might be interesting to some since fusion power is often glossed over in the media with quite nonsensical explanations and the usual (20 years from now since 1990) hand wave. The article discusses some of the current hurdles in creation of a stable fusion power plant, and highlights a recent breakthrough in understanding of the plasma behaviour in the doughnut shaped plasma inside fusion reactors.

Scientists discover a process that stabilizes fusion plasmas - link to the media article (which has link to the original, but after a quick glimpse I do not recommend reading if you're not a physicist.)

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2019, 12:27:12 PM »
Researchers from Swansea University in Wales have identified a previously unknown strain of soil borne bacteria that is effective against four out of six antibiotic-resistant superbugs, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs: New hope for tackling antibiotic resistance


Growth of the previously unknown actinobacteria strain, Streptomyces sp. myrophorea (isolate McG1 species of Streptomyces). S. sp. myrophorea originates from an ethnopharmacology folk medicine used by neolithic peoples and druids in the townland of Toneel North in Boho, County Fermanagh. This bacteria is aptly named because it produces a distinctive fragrance similar to wintergreen oil (Greek: myro (fragrance) + phorea (porter, carrier)). Despite superficially resembling fungi, Streptomyces are true bacteria and account for two-thirds of the most common antibiotics used in modern medicine. S. sp. myrophorea is inhibitory to many species of ESKAPE pathogens, can grow in high alkalinity (pH 10.5) and can tolerate relatively high levels of radioactivity. © G. Quinn, Swansea University.


For the microbiologists and other enthusiasts on E, here is the resource material:

Terra, L., Dyson, P. J., Hitchings, M. D., Thomas, L., Abdelhameed, A., Banat, I. M., Gazze, S. A., Vujaklija, D., Facey, P. D., Francis, L. W. & Quinn, G. A. (2018). A novel alkaliphilic streptomyces inhibits ESKAPE pathogens. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9: 2458. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.02458

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #39 on: January 10, 2019, 12:30:46 PM »
Researchers from Swansea University in Wales have identified a previously unknown strain of soil borne bacteria that is effective against four out of six antibiotic-resistant superbugs, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs: New hope for tackling antibiotic resistance


Growth of the previously unknown actinobacteria strain, Streptomyces sp. myrophorea (isolate McG1 species of Streptomyces). S. sp. myrophorea originates from an ethnopharmacology folk medicine used by neolithic peoples and druids in the townland of Toneel North in Boho, County Fermanagh. This bacteria is aptly named because it produces a distinctive fragrance similar to wintergreen oil (Greek: myro (fragrance) + phorea (porter, carrier)). Despite superficially resembling fungi, Streptomyces are true bacteria and account for two-thirds of the most common antibiotics used in modern medicine. S. sp. myrophorea is inhibitory to many species of ESKAPE pathogens, can grow in high alkalinity (pH 10.5) and can tolerate relatively high levels of radioactivity. © G. Quinn, Swansea University.


For the microbiologists and other enthusiasts on E, here is the resource material:

Terra, L., Dyson, P. J., Hitchings, M. D., Thomas, L., Abdelhameed, A., Banat, I. M., Gazze, S. A., Vujaklija, D., Facey, P. D., Francis, L. W. & Quinn, G. A. (2018). A novel alkaliphilic streptomyces inhibits ESKAPE pathogens. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9: 2458. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.02458

Awesome! I hope they'll start human testing soon.

I've also casually been following the experiments to find microbes in soil with much excitement. They're super promising, and makes perfect sense to try look for more antibiotics there given how it's been the battleground for back-and-forth between different microbes for so long. All these new findings of soil microbes combined with the promising phage therapy really make the doomsday scenarios of oncoming super bugs seem much less likely.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #40 on: January 10, 2019, 12:44:10 PM »
Awesome! I hope they'll start human testing soon.

I've also casually been following the experiments to find microbes in soil with much excitement. They're super promising, and makes perfect sense to try look for more antibiotics there given how it's been the battleground for back-and-forth between different microbes for so long. All these new findings of soil microbes combined with the promising phage therapy really make the doomsday scenarios of oncoming super bugs seem much less likely.

Indeed, it is a novel discovery for the field of microbiology. I am interested to see how Streptomyces sp. myrophorea, McG1 will affect the epidemiology of specific types of diseases, especially those in HAI (Hospital Associated Infections). I think this discovery, coupled with the judicious prescription of antibiotics by general practitioners (and farmers), can help combat the insurgence of antibiotic resistant "super-bugs".

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #41 on: January 15, 2019, 08:04:15 PM »
BenchSci is a free antibody (Ab/Ig) search engine for academic researchers and scientists with publication data to help decode comprehensive open- and closed-access datasets, display published figures with no commercial bias and permit a search on experimental variables.

Neat.


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2019, 02:04:19 AM »
This is pretty neat, thanks ;D Might actually find use for this tool.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #43 on: January 28, 2019, 06:46:49 PM »
If you're a paleontologist, ichthyologist or general enthusiast, you might find this article interesting, about how the teeth of the newly discovered Galagadon nordquistae were found in the rock that once surrounded the famous Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, Sue.


Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #44 on: January 28, 2019, 10:28:24 PM »
The question now is: Was Sue gnawed on by the shark, or vice versa?

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #45 on: January 29, 2019, 12:50:04 PM »
Hehe, that is pretty cool.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #46 on: February 01, 2019, 06:20:51 AM »
A really cool new method for 3D printing. Kind of genius how they can do it with just light projector and rotating sample holder. Really looking forward to this getting optimized to higher resolution.


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #47 on: February 01, 2019, 10:38:11 AM »
Thanks for sharing, Sain! I love 3D printing; I have a friend who has the conventional machine, so seeing it in action is any form is very interesting  ;D
« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 02:30:04 PM by Argyros Drakontos »

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2019, 12:05:58 PM »
We really are witnessing history with how the AI has improved in last few years. It's absolutely bonkers how fast things are going forward.


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #49 on: February 07, 2019, 06:38:31 PM »
Fashion Alert! Researchers have fabricated a textile that dynamically regulates heat passing through the its weave, automatically cooling or insulating the user depending on exogenous stimuli. [Article]




Fig. 1. New fabric created by University of Maryland scientists YuHuang Wang and Ouyang Min is the first textile to automatically change properties to trap or release heat depending on external conditions. © Faye Levine, University of Maryland.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2019, 01:26:22 AM »
Fashion Alert! Researchers have fabricated a textile that dynamically regulates heat passing through the its weave, automatically cooling or insulating the user depending on exogenous stimuli. [Article]




Fig. 1. New fabric created by University of Maryland scientists YuHuang Wang and Ouyang Min is the first textile to automatically change properties to trap or release heat depending on external conditions. © Faye Levine, University of Maryland.

Oh what the heck  :o One shirt for every weather? I've been wanting something like that forever.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #51 on: February 10, 2019, 02:10:42 PM »
Neuroengineers from Columbia University have created a methodology that translates thoughts into logical, decipherable speech. A scientific first, this novel concept utilizes a combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and speech synthesizers to allow for new ways for computers to communication directly with the human brain and vice versa. [Article]




Fig. 1. Schematic of the speech reconstruction method. (Akbari et al., 2019).


REF: Akbari, H., Khalighinejad, B., Herrero, J. L., Mehta, A. D. & Mesgarani, N. (2019). Towards reconstructing intelligible speech from the human auditory cortex. Scientific Reports 9(1). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-37359-z

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #52 on: February 10, 2019, 02:21:02 PM »
Noticed the headline on that as well (though did not read further into it). Does sound pretty amazing. Potentially game breaking for helping some disabled people?!

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #53 on: February 10, 2019, 02:32:38 PM »
Noticed the headline on that as well (though did not read further into it). Does sound pretty amazing. Potentially game breaking for helping some disabled people?!

Agreed! We all want to be understood one way or another  :-)

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2019, 05:38:39 PM »
Bug Out! Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA (Ecological DNA) method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species. [Article].




REF: Thomsen,P. F., & Sigsgaard, E. E (2019). Environmental DNA metabarcoding of wild flowers reveals diverse communities of terrestrial arthropods. Ecology and Evolution. DOI: 10.1002/ece3.4809

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #55 on: February 15, 2019, 06:07:16 AM »
Those new techniques to sequence tiny amounts of DNA are really opening nifty new windows to so many things.

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #56 on: February 15, 2019, 07:50:14 AM »
Researchers have suggested before thet there are signs of a sheet of liquid water on the underside of the southern polar ice cap of Mars. Now, a new study in a geophysics journal makes the conclusion that if there is liquid water down there, it could imply buried volcanism deep inside the Martian crust, or otherwise there would not be the kind of heat needed to melt the ice from below.

The presence of any sheet of water hasn't been proved yet, for sure, though we do know that water does exist on Mars and likely sometimes in liquid form - but the idea of volcanism and tectonic activity on the red planet is fascinating. It would have to have been very recently in geologicial time - withjin the last few hundred thousand years - which would point to it being an ongoing feature of Mars over time. Also, volcanic vents plus liquid water increases the chances of primitive life forms.

http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/New_study_suggests_possibility_of_recent_underground_volcanism_on_Mars_999.html

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #57 on: February 21, 2019, 03:24:14 PM »
This video provides an interesting perspective on the dilemma facing conservationists in Silicon Valley, California. What defines nature? What would you do?


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2019, 03:40:10 PM »
That is interesting. It is really hard to say indeed, especially now that we're causing big moves in the ecosystems and moving species with climate change.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #59 on: February 21, 2019, 03:59:41 PM »
That is interesting. It is really hard to say indeed, especially now that we're causing big moves in the ecosystems and moving species with climate change.

You bring up a valid point. We are indeed on the cusp of the Anthropocene, or the Age of Man. For those who are interested, I highly recommend watching Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2018) to learn more about this paradigm shift in our climate and how we as humans are both responsible for its inauguration and its explication.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #60 on: February 22, 2019, 06:04:26 PM »
Researchers have discovered that the introduction of predatory organisms into the environment can cause single-celled organisms such as algae to evolve into multicellular organisms over the span of fifty (50) weeks, which is the equivalent of 750 generations. You can watch time lapse videos of the phenomenon in the supplementary information near the end of the publication. [Article]




Figure 1. Depiction of C. reinhardtii life cycles following evolution with (B2, B5) or without (K1) predators for 50 weeks. Categories (A–D) show a variety of life cycle characteristics, from unicellular to various multicellular forms. Briefly, A shows the ancestral, wild-type life cycle; in B this is modified with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix; C is similar to B but forms much larger multicellular structures; while D shows a fully multicellular life cycle in which multicellular clusters release multicellular propagules. Evolved strains were qualitatively categorized based on growth during 72-hour time-lapse videos. Strains within each life cycle category are listed below illustrations. Representative microscopic images of each life cycle category are at the bottom.




Herron, M. D., Borin, J. M., Boswell, J. C., Walker, J., Chen, I-C., K., Knox, C. A., Boyd, M. Rosenzweig, F. & Ratcliff, W. C. (2019). De novo origins of multicellularity in response to predation. Scientific Reports 9: 2328. doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-39558-8

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #61 on: March 02, 2019, 12:06:43 AM »
Researchers from MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have discovered that spider silk – one of the strongest materials for its weight – produces a strong twisting motion when exposed to humidity, which could prove useful for future artificial muscles or actuators. [Article]





Figure 1. An experimental setup used to study the behaviour of spider dragline silk. The cylindrical chamber at center allows for precise control of humidity while testing the contraction and twisting of the fiber. © MIT

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #62 on: March 02, 2019, 01:22:33 AM »
Spidersilk really is amazing. Now we just need some way to make tons of it.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #63 on: March 07, 2019, 06:14:36 PM »
According to a new publication by researchers at UCL, doctors have observed the second contingency of a patient ("London Patient") demonstrating sustained remission from HIV-1 after ceasing treatment. The case study was published approximately ten years after the first case, known as the "Berlin Patient". [Article]




Figure 1. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image revealing the presence of numerous human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) virions budding from a cultured lymphocyte. © Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. & R. McManus.



Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #64 on: March 08, 2019, 05:34:35 AM »
According to a new publication by researchers at UCL, doctors have observed the second contingency of a patient ("London Patient") demonstrating sustained remission from HIV-1 after ceasing treatment. The case study was published approximately ten years after the first case, known as the "Berlin Patient". [Article]




Figure 1. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image revealing the presence of numerous human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) virions budding from a cultured lymphocyte. © Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. & R. McManus.



This is quite amazing. It's humbling to see how decades of reasearch slowly working towards the cure finally begin to pay off. A bit worried though that the virus couls mutate to use some other receptor, but maybe with good clinical practice it can be delayed. Still, really uplifting ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #65 on: March 11, 2019, 10:57:56 PM »
In Yellowstone National Park, researchers from Washington State University have discovered thermophilic bacteria that "eat and breathe" electricity through solid carbon surfaces of electrodes, which could be utilized for low-power applications to help alleviate one of the biggest challenge facing humanity; environmental pollution and sustainable energy. [Article]





Figure 1. Pools of hot water like this one are home to thermophilic bacteria that can "eat and breathe" electricity via filamentous cilia that affix endogenous electrons to outside metals or minerals. © WSU, 2019.



The aforementioned article is reminiscent of other studies demonstrating the promising potential of utilizing microorganisms in achieving global sustainability, including bioremediation of contaminated land:



Articles


  • ENN. (2018). A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling? Retrieved March 11, 2019 from [Article]

  • Flashman, E. (2018). How plastic-eating bacteria actually work: A chemist explains. Retrieved March 11, 2019 from [Article]

  • Mohamed, A., Ha, P. T, Peyton, B. M., Mueller, R., Meagher, M. & Beyenal, H. (2019). In situ enrichment of microbial communities on polarized electrodes deployed in alkaline hot springs. Journal of Power Sources, 414: 547. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2019.01.027

  • Rhodes, C.J. (2014). Mycoremediation (bioremediation with fungi): Growing mushrooms to clean the earth. Chemical Speciation & Bioavailability, 26(3), 196–198, DOI: 10.3184/095422914X14047407349335


Videos





Offline 3jackdaws

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #66 on: March 12, 2019, 11:49:09 AM »
A lecture on bioelectric computation found in animals and what we might be able to learn from these naturally occurring computational architectures.


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #67 on: March 12, 2019, 02:41:03 PM »
So much cool stuff today ;D Thank you guys!

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #68 on: March 13, 2019, 11:04:51 PM »
And now to something completely different.

Research suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, fans of violent music are not desensitized to violence.

The BBC report.
The research paper.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #69 on: March 17, 2019, 01:06:18 PM »
Neuroscientists from the University of California in Berkeley may have developed an alternative to regaining vision from retinal degeneration. Instead of electronic eye implants, patients can undergo gene therapy where intraocular AAV delivery of spliced green opsin can give them enough eyesight to discern patterns at a resolution sufficient for myopic reading. With exisiting AAV therapies already approved, this new therapy could be ready for clinical trials in as little as three years. [Article].


Image Warning: Contains Needles


Figure 1. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) engineered to target specific cells in the retina can be injected directly into the vitreous of the eye to deliver genes more precisely than can be done with wild type AAVs, which have to be injected directly under the retina. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have taken AAVs targeted to ganglion cells, loaded them with a gene for green opsin, and made the normally blind ganglion cells sensitive to light. © John Flannery, UC Berkeley.

Offline Oniya


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #71 on: March 22, 2019, 08:28:06 PM »
A team of researchers from Stanford University has developed a novel method to harness our planet's most abundant natural resource for chemical energy. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the findings demonstrate a new way of separating hydrogen and oxygen gas from seawater via electricity. Existing scientific methods rely on highly purified water, which is a rare, precious resource (< 1% Tw) and costly to produce. [Article]




Figure 1. A prototype device that utilizes solar radiation to create hydrogen fuel from seawater. © Hongjie Dai, Yun Kuang & Michael Kenney.

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #72 on: March 22, 2019, 09:07:58 PM »
I remember playing around with salt water electrolysis as a kid, the salt acting as an electrolyte -- a bowl of water, table salt, two large nails and a handful of 9V batteries.  The nails would corrode like crazy, which apparently was the problem that the researches set out to solve.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #73 on: March 30, 2019, 06:22:37 PM »
An approved drug typically administered for treating fungal infections also has the potential to effectively treat people with cystic fibrosis, new research suggests. The drug, amphotericin B, can function as a molecular prosthesis for a dysfunctional protein channel called CFTR, which is a key agent in fighting infections. Researchers have compared the new drug with another pharmaceutical called ivacaftor, which is also known to improve the function of CFTR proteins with specific mutations. Lab tests with human grown lung cells have proven that both drugs can improve pH levels, increase bicarbonate secretion and decrease viscosity of fluid accumulation in the lungs. However, only amphotericin B was able to restore function in patients since it bypasses the mutated CFTR protein.[1]. [Article]




Figure 1. People with cystic fibrosis have a genetic defect called G551D that causes the exclusion of the CFTR protein within the lining of the lungs that releases bicarbonate (HCO3-), a key compound in fighting infections. The drug amphotericin B can form channels to release bicarbonate in lung tissue, restoring the airway surface liquid's antibiotic properties.



Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #74 on: April 01, 2019, 04:44:18 AM »
That is nice, moreso since it's an approved drug so they don't have to go through as rigorous testing to get it to the patients! Good to see these kinds of studies that give secondary uses for known compounds. I guess they might not be very exciting to carry out in the lab, but we for sure need more of them :P

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #75 on: April 04, 2019, 05:53:23 AM »
This is not exactly a finding, but more of a hype. Next week on April 10th the first ever pictures captured of a black hole will be released! Exciting stuff. My horror and scifi muse is already tingling.

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #76 on: April 05, 2019, 02:22:32 AM »
A fascinating TED talk about public space and civic life. Focused on America, but the insights are for everyone.

https://www.ted.com/talks/james_howard_kunstler_dissects_suburbia

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #77 on: April 09, 2019, 10:25:21 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #78 on: April 10, 2019, 09:15:54 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2019, 06:43:51 PM »
That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Very cool, Sain! Thank you for sharing.

And for those who are curious as to why the image is so
blurry
, it's actually one of the highest resolution images ever taken. The EHT (Event Horizon Telescope) collected approximately 1000 disks and 5 petabytes of data, which is equivalent to "all of the selfies that 40,000 people will take in their lifetime." Plus, the black hole is 55 million light years away. [Article]


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #80 on: April 14, 2019, 05:13:47 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #81 on: April 14, 2019, 05:31:50 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Ooooh, need to read this one later. It's really cool to see the new CRISPR version coming up and the toolkit expanding.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #82 on: April 17, 2019, 06:22:27 PM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #83 on: April 18, 2019, 05:03:37 AM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]

Thank you for sharing Argyros! Seems to be still ten years away from usable according to the scientists, but nonetheless impressive. Remember chatting with someone who was trying to make kidneys and getting the cells into proper organ shape and having them stay in it is for sure one of the biggest challenges for any organ 3D printing. Now getting them to work properly after it is another hurdle, but I would assume maybe that's something they can do with hormone or chemical treaments now that the cells are where they should be. Definitely interesting to follow the process of this field. And relaxing since you only have to check news every year or so to keep up with them ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #84 on: April 21, 2019, 04:03:16 PM »
The human memory contains a special protein known as Arc that behaves like a virus, neuroscientists say. Now, the article is erroneously titled as our memory doesn't come from a virus, rather that it acts like one. Just something to remember (/pun). [Article]


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #85 on: April 25, 2019, 02:30:58 AM »
The human memory contains a special protein known as Arc that behaves like a virus, neuroscientists say. Now, the article is erroneously titled as our memory doesn't come from a virus, rather that it acts like one. Just something to remember (/pun). [Article]



Damn that was a fun read ;D Cool in so many ways. Just them suggesting that viruses played a bigger role in evolutionary process than we imagined is something crazy. This is such inspiring fuel for scifi stories. I can see plots about some species seeding certain key-evolutionary viruses on a planet with simpler life forms to uplift them into something more sentient. And even cyberpunky stuff where we don't do gene-engineering but viral engineer something new into people. This screams "write me!" Heh.



There's new evidence showing that parents getting a child less than three years prior to marriage (which here is used as a marker of when they start to have sex I suppose) may increase the risk of their first born getting schizophrenia. [article] [research paper] This was so wacky and weird, but the paper looks pretty legit as well. The reason they provided was that it'd take some time for the mother's immune system to get used to the father's sperm. It sorta makes sense in the common sense kinda way too, and it's fun to think about whether or not the amount of sex parents have might also affect that immune response (given the mother's increased contact with the sticky stuff).

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #86 on: April 25, 2019, 11:26:40 AM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms could reveal the key to reducing pesticide use worldwide. [Article] [Publication]

I have actually done research on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) previously, including gene splicing recombinant pre-mRNA, gene modification, transgenesis and cisgenesis. The last methodology is the locus of the research study, where scientists are studying how the genotype for glandular trichome–synthesized acylated sugars (“acylsugars”) can be assimilated into Solanum lycopersicum cvs. to help reduce pesticide use in not just tomatoes, but other agricultural crops as well.

The use of genetic engineering in botanical specimens is a delicate, finite process and presents unique challenges in agriculture. Ethical reasons, certainly. But moreover, toxicity. Improper cisgenesis may inadvertently increase or reactivate latent metabolic pathways in cultivated specimens whose wild antecedents procured chemical toxins or alkaloids, which can result in enzymatic activation or inhibition of these compounds. Examples include protease inhibitors (legumes), cyanogens (cassava and lima beans), goitrogens (canola), pressor amines (bananas) and solanine (nightshades). The predominant concern of failed cisgenesis in genetically engineered foods is the negative effect on humans if these toxic compounds are ingested in high volumes. For example, α-solanine in potatoes inhibits the neurotransmitter enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which can impair nervous system functionality to a similar degree as organophosphates or carbamates.

It’s food for thought (/pun).

Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #87 on: April 25, 2019, 11:37:50 AM »
There's new evidence showing that parents getting a child less than three years prior to marriage (which here is used as a marker of when they start to have sex I suppose) may increase the risk of their first born getting schizophrenia. [article] [research paper] This was so wacky and weird, but the paper looks pretty legit as well. The reason they provided was that it'd take some time for the mother's immune system to get used to the father's sperm. It sorta makes sense in the common sense kinda way too, and it's fun to think about whether or not the amount of sex parents have might also affect that immune response (given the mother's increased contact with the sticky stuff).

So, the takeaway here is to have a lot of sex before trying to conceive?  (And I hope they meant three years after marriage.)

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #88 on: April 25, 2019, 01:34:03 PM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms could reveal the key to reducing pesticide use worldwide. [Article] [Publication]

I have actually done research on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) previously, including gene splicing recombinant pre-mRNA, gene modification, transgenesis and cisgenesis. The last methodology is the locus of the research study, where scientists are studying how the genotype for glandular trichome–synthesized acylated sugars (“acylsugars”) can be assimilated into Solanum lycopersicum cvs. to help reduce pesticide use in not just tomatoes, but other agricultural crops as well.

The use of genetic engineering in botanical specimens is a delicate, finite process and presents unique challenges in agriculture. Ethical reasons, certainly. But moreover, toxicity. Improper cisgenesis may inadvertently increase or reactivate latent metabolic pathways in cultivated specimens whose wild antecedents procured chemical toxins or alkaloids, which can result in enzymatic activation or inhibition of these compounds. Examples include protease inhibitors (legumes), cyanogens (cassava and lima beans), goitrogens (canola), pressor amines (bananas) and solanine (nightshades). The predominant concern of failed cisgenesis in genetically engineered foods is the negative effect on humans if these toxic compounds are ingested in high volumes. For example, α-solanine in potatoes inhibits the neurotransmitter enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which can impair nervous system functionality to a similar degree as organophosphates or carbamates.

It’s food for thought (/pun).

Oh, that's really interesting to hear from someone who's worked with plants. I've found gene-engineering plants a super cool topic forever, though never got beyond the surface of the "damn this is cool" ;D. It's interesting to hear about all the little details regarding them. Some neat things that I'll definitely pepper in my scifi stories later on.

So, the takeaway here is to have a lot of sex before trying to conceive?  (And I hope they meant three years after marriage.)

Yes. Fuck lots and without condom before trying to make a baby.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #89 on: April 25, 2019, 02:05:30 PM »
I've found gene-engineering plants a super cool topic [...]

Agreed

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #90 on: April 25, 2019, 10:37:43 PM »
Researchers studying wild tomato plants in Peru have found that understanding the plants’ evolutionary defense mechanisms [...]

It explains so much!


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #91 on: April 27, 2019, 04:41:36 PM »
Oh, a friend shared this to me last week, I forgot to share it here. It's not really an academic finding per-se, but I did stumble upon it during a seminar lecture while not listening to it so heh, sorta found it in academic context at least! Anyway, the map shows CO2 emissions and electricity productions of each country that tracks their data. Really cool way to get some context to different methods of energy production since many people seem to be kinda fuzzy on those and perhaps sometimes put a little too much trust on wind/solar as the solutions of the coming century.

https://www.electricitymap.org/?page=country&solar=false&remote=true&wind=false&countryCode=FI

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #92 on: April 27, 2019, 06:21:12 PM »
Oh, a friend shared this to me last week, I forgot to share it here. It's not really an academic finding per-se, but I did stumble upon it during a seminar lecture while not listening to it so heh, sorta found it in academic context at least! Anyway, the map shows CO2 emissions and electricity productions of each country that tracks their data. Really cool way to get some context to different methods of energy production since many people seem to be kinda fuzzy on those and perhaps sometimes put a little too much trust on wind/solar as the solutions of the coming century.

https://www.electricitymap.org/?page=country&solar=false&remote=true&wind=false&countryCode=FI

Thank you very much for sharing, Sain! I really enjoyed exploring the features of this map, and visualizing how each type of energy production correlated to CO2 emissions in each country.

On a similar TAN, I would like to share an online resource tool that was used as a reference in my hydrology courses. Aqueduct is an interactive map database for water risk analysis based on a conjunction of industrial, hydrological and climatological variables. Examples of variables include baseline water stress, groundwater stress, drought severity, upstream storage and flood occurrence. Aqueduct is so comprehensive that it can actually determine water risk analysis for threatened species of amphibians in freshwater ecosystems. How cool is that?!

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #93 on: April 28, 2019, 03:23:22 AM »
Thank you very much for sharing, Sain! I really enjoyed exploring the features of this map, and visualizing how each type of energy production correlated to CO2 emissions in each country.

On a similar TAN, I would like to share an online resource tool that was used as a reference in my hydrology courses. Aqueduct is an interactive map database for water risk analysis based on a conjunction of industrial, hydrological and climatological variables. Examples of variables include baseline water stress, groundwater stress, drought severity, upstream storage and flood occurrence. Aqueduct is so comprehensive that it can actually determine water risk analysis for threatened species of amphibians in freshwater ecosystems. How cool is that?!

That's pretty cool. Neat that it has options for different industries as well ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #94 on: April 30, 2019, 06:00:33 PM »
In anthropology news, scientists have allegedly discovered the oldest footprint to ever be found in the Americas, dating back approximately 15,600 years. [Article] [Publication]

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #95 on: May 05, 2019, 01:00:17 PM »
Wolves are more inclined to help each other than domesticated dogs, according to an experiment done by behavioural researchers at the Wolf Science Center in Vienna, Austria. [Article] [Publication]




Figure 1. The researchers trained nine wolves and six dogs to interact with a “giving” symbol on this touchscreen, which would then dispense a treat to their partner in an adjacent room. © Rachel Dale, Wolf Science Center, 2019.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #96 on: May 08, 2019, 07:09:38 PM »
Researchers from the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote¹ for the venom of the Australian Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), considered by many to be the most lethal species of jellyfish in the world. [Article] [Publication]




Figure 1. The Australian Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), or "Sea Wasp". © Jamie Seymour



¹ – While the antidote has been scientifically proven to block pain, scarring and necrosis of the epidermis, it is unclear as to whether it can prevent more serious symptoms of envenomation, such as hyperkalemia or cardiac arrest.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #97 on: May 14, 2019, 06:31:33 PM »
Researchers from Washington State University have developed a viable, ecological alternative to Styrofoam. The foam is predominantly constructed from nanocrystal cellulose, which is not only an excellent insulator but is also very lightweight and can support up to 200 times its own weight without altering its original shape. The manufacturing process is also simple and environmentally friendly, using water as a solvent instead of chemicals. [Article] [Publication]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #98 on: May 15, 2019, 03:38:55 AM »
Researchers from Washington State University have developed a viable, ecological alternative to Styrofoam. The foam is predominantly constructed from nanocrystal cellulose, which is not only an excellent insulator but is also very lightweight and can support up to 200 times its own weight without altering its original shape. The manufacturing process is also simple and environmentally friendly, using water as a solvent instead of chemicals. [Article] [Publication]

That is quite cool. Nano cellulose is a big hype thing over here too given Finland's dependence on forestry. Always exciting to see people come up with new natural materials.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #99 on: May 15, 2019, 05:17:44 PM »
That is quite cool. Nano cellulose is a big hype thing over here too given Finland's dependence on forestry. Always exciting to see people come up with new natural materials.

I am excited to see what they come up with next!

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #100 on: May 15, 2019, 07:35:36 PM »
Pico cellulose?

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #101 on: May 18, 2019, 11:07:55 AM »


Looks like open AI has finally almost completely eclipsed human level skill in Dota2.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #102 on: May 18, 2019, 11:26:19 AM »
Spoiler: Click to Show/Hide


Looks like open AI has finally almost completely eclipsed human level skill in Dota2.



Reminiscent of the AlphaStar (AI) Bot from Deep Mind. Damn computers, you scary! [Article]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #103 on: May 18, 2019, 11:31:07 AM »
They are crazy. Can't wait to see what we have next year!

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #104 on: May 18, 2019, 11:36:28 AM »
Cyberdyne Systems?

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #105 on: May 20, 2019, 07:48:53 PM »
A new research study has discovered that computers can be just as good, if not better, than doctors at detecting lung cancer based on CT imaging scans. The AI was 94% accurate in screening for lung cancer on 6,716 CT scans, and exhibited fewer false positives and false negatives compared to a team of professional radiologists. While the technology is a work in progress and not ready for public use, it does offer a glimpse into the future of artificial intelligence in medicine. [Article] [Publication]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #106 on: May 21, 2019, 04:22:34 AM »
A new research study has discovered that computers can be just as good, if not better, than doctors at detecting lung cancer based on CT imaging scans. The AI was 94% accurate in screening for lung cancer on 6,716 CT scans, and exhibited fewer false positives and false negatives compared to a team of professional radiologists. While the technology is a work in progress and not ready for public use, it does offer a glimpse into the future of artificial intelligence in medicine. [Article] [Publication]

These are awesome. I'm involved in some diagnostics development myself and it's been awesome to watch what AI can do with images. We have skin cancer, and now radiological data analysed by them? Can't wait to see them integrated into typical lab testing with ELISA and immunoblotting as well. I have no doubt they'll far surpass doctors in near future given that we have massive databanks to train them with. Now if only we had decent lobbyists advocating for the assisted diagnostics to get approved or endorsed by CDC, EDC, and other organizations  ::) Buuuut my guess is the doctors lobbying to keep absolute control and authority have richer lobbyists and some folk are gonna have to fight hard to deliver this stuff to us patients. Same thing with rapid diagnostics and self testing in general.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #107 on: May 22, 2019, 05:18:54 PM »
Now if only we had decent lobbyists advocating for the assisted diagnostics to get approved or endorsed by CDC, EDC, and other organizations  ::)

<insert lobbyist satire here>

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #108 on: May 23, 2019, 05:21:40 PM »
Chemical engineers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario have discovered how to preserve vaccines without refrigeration. The live virus vaccine (LVV) was desiccated with a sugar solution, which could then be stored at 40ºC (104ºF) for months without negative effects on its efficacy. This scientific discovery is particularly impressive as current vaccines are extremely fragile, requiring a specific temperature range (2–8ºC) to retain its effectiveness, which only lasts for a few days. [Article] [Publication]

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #109 on: May 30, 2019, 07:06:17 PM »
Scientists from the University of Toronto have developed a new electrochemical pathway to transform atmospheric CO2 into commercial products such as fuel and plastics. This emergent direct-air carbon capture technology achieves a no-waste manufacturing process, with a 100% carbon utilization rate. [Article] [Publication]

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #110 on: June 06, 2019, 10:39:12 PM »
Calling all armour fans! Researchers from North Carolina State University (NCSU) have created a composite metal foam (CMF) that stops .50 caliber ball and armor-piercing (AP) rounds as effectively as steel armour, at less than half the weight. In addition, the CMF is fire- and heat-resistant and very effective at shielding various types of radiation, including X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. This could be technology straight out of a science fiction novel! [Article] [Publication]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #111 on: June 07, 2019, 02:21:03 AM »
Calling all armour fans! Researchers from North Carolina State University (NCSU) have created a composite metal foam (CMF) that stops .50 caliber ball and armor-piercing (AP) rounds as effectively as steel armour, at less than half the weight. In addition, the CMF is fire- and heat-resistant and very effective at shielding various types of radiation, including X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. This could be technology straight out of a science fiction novel! [Article] [Publication]

Very cool. Need to take a looksie and steal their terminology for more believable scifi. Sounds like it could make good space ship armor.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #112 on: June 10, 2019, 07:14:26 PM »
UMBC Postdoctoral fellow Sarah Stellwagen and Rebecca Renberg at the Army Research Lab in Maryland have published the first ever complete sequences of genes that allow spiders to produce glue — a sticky, modified version of spider silk. This unique innovation could pave the way for scientists in manufacturing biomaterials for medical purposes [Article] [Publication]

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #113 on: June 10, 2019, 08:32:30 PM »
So, if I use CRISPR to splice that gene sequence into my DNA, and wear red-and-blue spandex and a mask, I could make out with Mary-Jane Watson?

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #114 on: June 11, 2019, 06:23:45 PM »
Scientists from UBC have discovered an enzymatic pathway in the human gut microbiome that can convert¹ Type A blood to Type O blood, the universal donor standard, by removing its defining antigens. The potential use for this discovery is huge, considering how much blood is required by hospitals on a daily basis for emergency surgeries, scheduled operations, and routine transfusions. [Article] [Publication]


¹ – With the same rhesus factor (Rh).

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #115 on: June 12, 2019, 03:39:01 AM »
Scientists from UBC have discovered an enzymatic pathway in the human gut microbiome that can convert¹ Type A blood to Type O blood, the universal donor standard, by removing its defining antigens. The potential use for this discovery is huge, considering how much blood is required by hospitals on a daily basis for emergency surgeries, scheduled operations, and routine transfusions. [Article] [Publication]


¹ – With the same rhesus factor (Rh).

What the heck, that sounds too good and awesome in everyway, will need to read the article later :o

e. Looked neat. I hope they can scale this up to production as soon as possible. I bet funding isn't gonna be an issue.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2019, 05:04:44 AM by Sain »

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #116 on: June 15, 2019, 03:10:34 PM »


This is just crazy good. Combine this with some of the modern speech synthetically and it's already impossible for an average human to tell fake inverview footage from neural network edited one.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #117 on: June 16, 2019, 01:25:41 PM »
Spoiler: Click to Show/Hide

This is just crazy good. Combine this with some of the modern speech synthetically and it's already impossible for an average human to tell fake interview footage from a neural network edited one.

Seeing is believing.

#1984

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #118 on: June 16, 2019, 05:51:42 PM »
Stressed? Researchers from the University of Colorado are currently working on a "stress vaccine" derived from Mycobacterium vaccae, a soil-borne bacterium. When laboratory mice were injected with the serum prior to a stressful event, it prevented a symptom similar to PTSD, which diminished stress reactions. Going a step further, the team was also able to identify, isolate and synthesize the lipid responsible for these effects. [Article] [Publication]

Offline Oniya

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #119 on: June 16, 2019, 05:59:19 PM »
Stressed? Researchers from the University of Colorado are currently working on a "stress vaccine" derived from Mycobacterium vaccae, a soil-borne bacterium. When laboratory mice were injected with the serum prior to a stressful event, it prevented a symptom similar to PTSD, which diminished stress reactions. Going a step further, the team was also able to identify, isolate and synthesize the lipid responsible for these effects. [Article] [Publication]

Soil-borne...  I wonder if this might be yet another reason that things like gardening and 'forest bathing' are useful ways of dealing with stress.  (The whole 'relaxing and being in quiet, calm environments' thing doesn't hurt either, of course.)

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #120 on: June 17, 2019, 05:47:45 PM »
Soil-borne...  I wonder if this might be yet another reason that things like gardening and 'forest bathing' are useful ways of dealing with stress.  (The whole 'relaxing and being in quiet, calm environments' thing doesn't hurt either, of course.)

I agree. I may be biased on this conjecture due to prior research, but the effects of nature on human health and well-being have been scientifically proven in studies the world over. [1] [2] [3] [4] I wouldn't be surprised if a soil-borne microorganism such as Mycobacterium vaccae was a contributing factor to reduced stress responses in humans, in addition to the ones you have mentioned.

Further to the original study, inactivated vaccines of M. vaccae have been previously utilized as immunotherapy for allergic asthma, cancer, depression, leprosy, psoriasis, dermatitis, eczema and tuberculosis. Interestingly, while M. vaccae is nonpathogenic, its cousin M. tuberculosis is highly pathogenic and, as the name suggests, is responsible for causing tuberculosis.

Quote from: Wikipedia
Numerous trials have indicated that exposure to oral and injectable products derived from M. vaccae bacteria can have positive effects in treating tuberculosis. Although a 2002 review of selected clinical trials failed to find any consistent benefit of certain dosage regimens of injectable Mycobacterium products in people with tuberculosis,[6] a more recent meta-analysis of 54 clinical studies of M. vaccae products for tuberculosis showed treatment resulted in improved sputum conversion and radiological (X-ray) assessment.[7]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #121 on: June 20, 2019, 10:49:27 AM »


About voice translation and voice transfer.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #122 on: June 25, 2019, 10:27:05 AM »


Holy damn. This stuff is insane.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #123 on: June 29, 2019, 10:33:24 AM »


O my god O.O 3D art is gonna go nuts with this technique.

Offline RedRose

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #124 on: July 08, 2019, 12:36:36 PM »
seriously need a stress vax

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #125 on: July 08, 2019, 01:11:16 PM »
seriously need a stress vax

Here you go...
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 07:10:30 PM by Oniya »

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #126 on: August 05, 2019, 08:00:59 AM »
Recursive language and modern imagination were acquired simultaneously 70,000 years ago

Article, link to the paper at the end of it.

Kinda fun. I wonder how it must've been for the first ones to speak proper language when they talked with their parents ;D

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #127 on: September 22, 2019, 04:20:07 PM »
A new way to decompose microplastics could help clear waterways of these tiny bits of trash, which may pose health risks to people and other animals. In the future, water treatment facilities that employ carbon nanomaterials may not only help prevent new microplastic pollutants from entering the environment, but also potentially remove the particles from polluted waterways. Jian Kang, a chemical engineer at Curtin University in Perth, Australia and colleagues tested their technique on 80 mL water samples contaminated with microplastic particles. Carbon nanotube treatment in water warmed to 120°C for eight hours reduced the amount of microplastic in the water by about 30 to 50%. Kang and colleagues are now working to refine their nanotubes to break down microplastics more efficiently without the help of high temperatures. [Article] [Publication]




Figure 1. Waterbourne microplastic particles being successfully decomposed by chemicals released by carbon nanotubes. © Xiaoguang Duan, 2019

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #128 on: September 28, 2019, 02:58:07 PM »
That is very cool. There's been lots of research and media attention in Finland recently too about how to remove microplastic from wastewater. It's just sad that most of those technologies are not going to apply to saving the oceans from it, but at least inland lakes might be salvageable, which is of course awesome!

Online Al Terego

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #129 on: September 28, 2019, 06:42:49 PM »
Speaking of...

Plastic Teabags Release Billions of Microparticles and Nanoparticles into Tea

Abstract Image
The increasing presence of micro- and nano-sized plastics in the environment and food chain is of growing concern. Although mindful consumers are promoting the reduction of single-use plastics, some manufacturers are creating new plastic packaging to replace traditional paper uses, such as plastic teabags. The objective of this study was to determine whether plastic teabags could release microplastics and/or nanoplastics during a typical steeping process. We show that steeping a single plastic teabag at brewing temperature (95 °C) releases approximately 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into a single cup of the beverage. The composition of the released particles is matched to the original teabags (nylon and polyethylene terephthalate) using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The levels of nylon and polyethylene terephthalate particles released from the teabag packaging are several orders of magnitude higher than plastic loads previously reported in other foods. An initial acute invertebrate toxicity assessment shows that exposure to only the particles released from the teabags caused dose-dependent behavioral and developmental effects.


Link

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #130 on: October 07, 2019, 06:15:08 AM »
A few milion years ago, around the time when Lucy and other early hominids were walking around in Africa, the heart of the Milky Way saw a series of super-powerful explosions and flare-ups, and at the time the core region must have been much more luminous than today, even in the night skies of Earth. And it didn't come and go overnight, either: this "active phase" is presumed to have lasted for around 300.000 years. All of it happening in connection with the huge black hole that still resides at the central point of our galaxy.

Amazing. :)

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/10/06/world/milky-way-center-explosion-scn/index.html

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #131 on: October 10, 2019, 09:31:45 PM »
Press Release! The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 to John B. Goodenough (University of Texas), M. Stanley Whittingham (Binghamton University), and Akira Yoshino (Meijo University) for their contributions to the development of the lithium-ion battery. This lightweight, rechargeable battery is used worldwide in electronic devices such as cellphones, laptops and electric vehicles, the last of which can store significant amounts of energy from renewable sources, making a fossil fuel-free society possible in the future. An award well deserved, if not a bit overdue. [Press Release] [Technology Information] [Scientific Background]

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #132 on: October 19, 2019, 10:11:24 AM »
Researchers at Penn Medicine have developed an effective gene therapy to successfully and safely prevent severe muscle deterioration associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disease that affects approximately 1 in 5,000 people. The scientific results were published on October 7, 2019 in Nature Medicine and delineates how the therapy uses utrophin (µUtro) as a non-immunogenic substitute for dystrophin, which eliminates the hindrance of immune responses found in other therapeutic approaches. [Article]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #133 on: October 19, 2019, 11:34:01 AM »
Press Release! The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 to John B. Goodenough (University of Texas), M. Stanley Whittingham (Binghamton University), and Akira Yoshino (Meijo University) for their contributions to the development of the lithium-ion battery. This lightweight, rechargeable battery is used worldwide in electronic devices such as cellphones, laptops and electric vehicles, the last of which can store significant amounts of energy from renewable sources, making a fossil fuel-free society possible in the future. An award well deserved, if not a bit overdue. [Press Release] [Technology Information] [Scientific Background]

Researchers at Penn Medicine have developed an effective gene therapy to successfully and safely prevent severe muscle deterioration associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disease that affects approximately 1 in 5,000 people. The scientific results were published on October 7, 2019 in Nature Medicine and delineates how the therapy uses utrophin (µUtro) as a non-immunogenic substitute for dystrophin, which eliminates the hindrance of immune responses found in other therapeutic approaches. [Article]

Damn these are both awesome news. It's really cool to see how science jut chugs on, keeps on making everything more awesome :-)

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #134 on: October 22, 2019, 12:07:53 PM »
Some more open AI stuff.


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #135 on: October 25, 2019, 07:14:26 AM »
Promising therapy for common form of eczema identified in early-stage trial

So a group has basically identified an anti–IL-33 antibody (etokimab), which, by inhibiting the function of  alarmin cytokine IL-33 (associated with variety of medical conditions), can treat the common eczema. Why I'm excited (besides having eczema) is that this drug would be a lot more specific than the currently prescribed drugs for difficult cases, ie. potentially have fewer side effects, and thereby be easier for doctors to prescribe. One thing that is not so exciting is that it's an antibody drug, so it will remain to be seen whether the prohibitive costs are gonna bar this one from reach of most people or not.

Original publication: Y.-L. Chen el al., "Proof-of-concept clinical trial of etokimab shows a key role for IL-33 in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis," Science Translational Medicine (2019). stm.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/ … scitranslmed.aax2945

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #136 on: October 26, 2019, 12:11:39 PM »
A new study published in the scientific journal eLife has revealed that ants are immune to spatial congestion when commuting. Even in dense, crowded conditions, ant colonies still managed to maintain a smooth and efficient traffic flow by adjusting their own behavior to adapt to changing circumstances. Scientists believe this is a type of biological adaptive system to benefit the entire colony. [Article] [Publication]

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #137 on: November 13, 2019, 08:11:41 AM »
The Universe may be curved around itself, instead of being geometrically structured the same way in all directions. :) And this is not just a purely theoretical possibility -.there are weird discrepancies in the data record that might ultimately lead to something like this...


https://www.livescience.com/universe-may-be-curved.html

Offline Dichotomy

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #138 on: November 22, 2019, 05:47:20 AM »
I can't help but snicker whenever I read this:
Are cats liquid?

Offline Lilias

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #139 on: November 22, 2019, 06:24:20 AM »
The Day the Dinosaurs Died

On one hand, I really want to see that Q Machine model. On the other hand... yikes! As previews of the apocalypse go, this makes it clear why Aziraphale and Crowley want none of it. :D

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #140 on: November 24, 2019, 04:26:57 PM »
Early sugar compounds may well have come from space, via meteorites, rather than just forming here in shallow parts of the primeval ocean.

Sugar compounds (riboses, etc) are one of the most basic groups of building blocks for the origin of life, and they've always been supposed to have formed locally here on Earth, so this finding of the stuff on board meteorites recently arrived from space is a real eye-opener.

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Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #141 on: March 11, 2020, 05:56:57 AM »
Coldest man in the world - absolutely fascinating article about an elite swimmer who takes a tour underneath an ice shelf of Antarctica, down into an ice-cave glacial river on the underside of the ice.  :P And not just foir fun - nope, he's making scentific observations of the state of the ice...

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/10/sport/lewis-pugh-slava-fetisov-antarctica-swim-spt-intl/index.html