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Author Topic: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.  (Read 710 times)

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Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« on: June 01, 2015, 08:19:47 PM »
For those looking to go Vegan, and/or Vegetarian. And for those who have already gone Vegan, and/or Vegetarian.

Questions? Opinions? Friendly conversation welcome.

Information of the benefits for Mother Earth, and her inhabitants.

My reason to go Vegan, was to save Mother Earth from the corruption, and greed that is at play to destroy, and harvest Her, as equal inhabitants.  The ever-growing destruction, and pollution of Mother Earth needs to stop.

Why did you go Vegan/Vegetarian, and/or looking to go Vegan/Vegetarian?

Do you believe being Vegan/Vegetarian has a more beneficial stance in nutritional activity?

Were we ever truly designed to eat meat. Or was it/is just a survival instinct?

Welcoming all questions for further information.

Feel free to share personal knowledge, and/or experience.

Good Morning. Afternoon. Day. Evening. And Night.

« Last Edit: June 01, 2015, 08:50:44 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2015, 08:57:17 PM »
For those who aren't getting enough nutritional-value, and/or looking to keep track of their nutritional, protein, caloric in-take. I suggest the site, 'Chronometer.' It is FDA approved, and has FDA approved required nutrition.

If you feel malnourished, I just suggest that you eat more legumes, beans, and grain. Use the site listed above to help, and build a diet to fit your daily needs. Build your daily foods for the week, if you must.

Here are some informative videos, that may help -

This YouTube channel is mainly for criticizing, and exposing the industry that promotes animal-based products. In what might seem like a harsh manner, with language. So if you are not into that, I would be cautious. But there are many other channels on YouTube that can be just as informative, and helpful, without that.





« Last Edit: June 01, 2015, 09:02:56 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2015, 10:09:37 PM »
I eat a daily diet of beans, grain, fruit, and vegetables. The majority of my food is cooked.

Every morning I take a B-12 metabolism supplement, and a Vitamin C.

I also eat baked, cooked, oiled, and candy foods/junk.

But depending on your health, diet-plan, what you want to achieve, how you want to achieve it, and when, is a completely personally opinion.

Just remember to take in a healthy amount of caloric, and nutritional food. Under-eating is not only unhealthy, but it can prove counterproductive. Eat more foods. Beans, grain/rice, and legumes are very calorie, and protein-dense. I suggest that you follow the Chronometer to cater to your individual lifestyle. It gives a metabolic-suggestive caloric in-take, with a workout included, if you do one. Many people complain of undernourishment while on the diet; remember what to eat. Remember how to eat.

If you are looking to lose weight, you have to watch your fat in-take. The fat that you eat, is the fat that you wear. If you really, really, must; under-eat. I suggest that you never under-eat more than over 300 calories per day. Avoid all saturated oils, if you can. Oils can add flavor, but can also be fatty. Stick to a strictly plant-based diet. Legumes, beans, grain, fruit, vegetables. Cook your foods, prepare them.

Good day.

Offline Caehlim

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2015, 04:44:29 AM »
Recently I've been trying to go vegetarian and have mostly managed it for the last month with some exceptions (due to sharing in group meals, using up meat I'd already bought, etc). I'm definitely getting the amount of meat in my diet down a lot and plan to keep avoiding it

Personally I'm taking vitamin and mineral supplements, including Vitamin B12. I'm replacing meat in meals with beans, eggs and mushrooms. I've been meaning to try out some tofu but haven't gotten around to it yet. I've got to admit it doesn't look very appetizing but I suspect that's just because I'm not used to it. I'm also just eating a lot more fruits, vegetables, cereals and rice.

One benefit I'm discovering is that it's often a lot cheaper to do the groceries with more vegetables and less meat. It's also got me doing a bit more home cooking, which is a fun habit to get back into. I'm eating a lot less fast food since most fast food is meat-based with few vegetarian options. Overall I think it's encouraged me to develop a healthier diet, although that's more of an indirect benefit from just thinking more about what I'm eating.

Why did you go Vegan/Vegetarian, and/or looking to go Vegan/Vegetarian?

There are two reasons.

Firstly meat is an inefficient use of resources, we could feed a lot more people on vegetarian diets than we can on omnivorous diets. The modern western diet, including a large amount of meat, is barely sustainable at present. With the growing industrialization of China, more people there are beginning to look at western diets as being an indication of success and there's been a rise in the market for meat in China. The much larger population there would require an even more unsustainable global agricultural industry to provide them with a modern western diet. I think making meat a smaller part of the western diet would have an overall positive effect on the world, with less division between developed and developing nations and less encouragement to move towards unsustainable agricultural practice.

Secondly I think we need to consider how we treat animals from an ethical perspective and that's difficult to do in our current marketplace. The near ubiquitous demand upon meat has created a very factory farm standard for churning out as much meat as possible in very unpleasant conditions. A reduction in this demand I think will allow more consideration in how it is managed rather than the present desperate rush to supply that need. Seeing growing amounts of vegetarians in the population may encourage farm owners to market their meat as being produced in a more ethical fashion, creating competition on this point and encouraging ethical treatment of animals through market forces.

I don't think that global vegetarianism is necessarily the way forwards, but I think enough people being vegetarians can make vegetarian options more mainstream and promote a reduction in the meat in people's diets. For the reasons I've gone into above I think that's beneficial to the world.

Quote
Do you believe being Vegan/Vegetarian has a more beneficial stance in nutritional activity?

No. At present I remain unconvinced that there is evidence for this.

However, as mentioned above, I think people taking the time to consider their diets is beneficial. So I'd encourage people to consider their diet and while doing that, consider vegetarianism as an option. When approached correctly, it is quite possible to have quite a healthy vegan or vegetarian diet. Just make sure that any such diet answers the question, "where am I going to get my A) Protein, B) Vitamin B12 and C) Calcium?"

Quote
Were we ever truly designed to eat meat. Or was it/is just a survival instinct?

We weren't designed. However our inability to synthesize vitamin B12 or derive it from non-animal sources strongly suggests that historically humans have naturally had meat in our diet in the past. It's a naturalistic fallacy to assume that this therefore means eating meat is a good thing, but I think we can certainly say that eating meat is natural for whatever relevance that has to the conversation.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 04:45:49 AM by Caehlim »

Offline Sho

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2015, 12:17:16 PM »
While I doubt I'll ever go strictly vegan/vegetarian, I've been debating trying to shift over to a primarily vegetarian lifestyle. I do have one particular concern, though...I've been trying to lose weight lately, and I'm a bit concerned that I would find it hard not to eat too many carbohydrates on a vegetarian diet.

Do you have any suggestions of where to look for protein-heavy/low-carbohydrate vegetarian recipes that will keep you full?

Also, how do you manage eating out at restaurants without inconveniencing your friends? This is a particular concern of mine, because I know it drives me nuts when I'm eating with people and they refuse to eat at a bevy of different restaurants because of non-allergic concerns (this isn't meant to be offensive, and I hope it's not taken as such, it's just a legitimate concern of mine).

Thirdly, on a vegetarian diet is it absolutely necessary to supplement your diet with vitamins? I've been getting plenty of vitamins from my current diet and haven't needed to take other supplements, and I have to admit that I have some concern about switching to a diet that requires outside nutritional supplements to be sustainable.

Finally, what have your experiences been with traveling internationally and maintaining a vegetarian/vegan diet? I travel quite often and I would be concerned about the sustainability of such a diet when traveling.

Offline consortium11

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2015, 01:30:21 PM »
None vegi/vegan here but one who keeps up with nutrition a lot.

While I doubt I'll ever go strictly vegan/vegetarian, I've been debating trying to shift over to a primarily vegetarian lifestyle. I do have one particular concern, though...I've been trying to lose weight lately, and I'm a bit concerned that I would find it hard not to eat too many carbohydrates on a vegetarian diet.

Most carbohydrates come from the usual offenders... bread, rice, pasta etc etc... and there's no more of a requirement to eat them in a vegetarian or vegan diet then there is a meat-inclusive one. In essence think about it this way; take your usual high protein/low fat meals and think about how you'd replace the protein source. I doubt anyone's going to answer that by saying "stick a load of bread and/or french fries in there".

Do you have any suggestions of where to look for protein-heavy/low-carbohydrate vegetarian recipes that will keep you full?

Anything that uses a lot of eggs and/or nuts/seeds is going to give you a decent kick of protein without much in the way of carbs; there's a reason both things make regular appearances on high protein/low carb meal plans even when meat and fish is allowed. In particular look at egg curries; there's an awful lot out there and a lot of them are rather good. If you're on low rather than no carbs then some quinoa can certainly help; it's got a fairly high protein content, it's a complete protein and putting a small amount in a soup, stew or salad isn't going to send your carb intake through the roof. Beyond that there's always the various vegetarian protein substitutes you can buy and the old favorite of tofu, beans and peas (notably chickpeas and blackbeans).

Also, how do you manage eating out at restaurants without inconveniencing your friends? This is a particular concern of mine, because I know it drives me nuts when I'm eating with people and they refuse to eat at a bevy of different restaurants because of non-allergic concerns (this isn't meant to be offensive, and I hope it's not taken as such, it's just a legitimate concern of mine).

Most (if not all) restaurants offer at least one if not more vegetarian options. Is it likely to fit absolutely perfectly into your diet? No... but that also applies when you're eating meat as well. Do the best you can and treat it as a cheat day if nothing else.

Thirdly, on a vegetarian diet is it absolutely necessary to supplement your diet with vitamins? I've been getting plenty of vitamins from my current diet and haven't needed to take other supplements, and I have to admit that I have some concern about switching to a diet that requires outside nutritional supplements to be sustainable.

It's not necessary. The main thing meat provides is a complete protein but so do eggs, quinoa, milk, quite a lot of nuts, quite a lot of beans, soy and several other things. Vegans have it more difficult due to the lack of dairy but it's far from insurmountable even then. Outside of complete proteins pretty much all the over nutrients you need can readily and easily be found in non-meat sources.

Finally, what have your experiences been with traveling internationally and maintaining a vegetarian/vegan diet? I travel quite often and I would be concerned about the sustainability of such a diet when traveling.

Vegetarian should be relatively easy to keep up in the majority of places. In much of the world diets are primarily vegetarian with meat an occasional treat to begin with and because of that there are more (and frequently better) vegetarian options than in the west. If the worst does come to the worst then I can't imagine there's many places where you can't find yourself some eggs, some vegetables/salad and some nuts... in much the same way that people who stick to a high protein/low carb diet including meat sometimes have to do it themselves. Food on the go is the bane of healthy eating whether meat is included or not.

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2015, 01:36:27 PM »
Recently I've been trying to go vegetarian and have mostly managed it for the last month with some exceptions (due to sharing in group meals, using up meat I'd already bought, etc). I'm definitely getting the amount of meat in my diet down a lot and plan to keep avoiding it.
I agree completely. Switching can be hard, for the body, mind, and socially. The body can take time to adjust the new diet. And sometimes it may be socially awkward. I never really ate much meat to begin with, maybe 2 - 4 times per month. Whether eating a burger, steak, chicken, and fast-food, etc. So the switch was a bit simple for my body to adjust to. But for others it can be feel strained, and sometimes sickly, as the body detoxes the unusual chemicals, of said product, from one's body.

For a couple years, I slowly started to realize that going to a Vegan-based diet can be more beneficial for my body, and the environment as a whole. In the beginning it was just for myself, maybe eating some meat, once-in-a-while. But then I saw all the corruption, lies, and deception to push meat out into the public domain. And then I saw the documentary film, 'Earthling', and that's what pushed me over the edge. Being healthy, and having a toned body is nice. But my real fight, and cause, is against large corporate flesh-farming. And everyone else who pushes it out to the public, and promotes it. Education pharmaceuticals, medical, fitness, entertainment, music, media, and the FDA.

I'm not going to vote for a conspiracy of corporations to promote their product, with my dollar. I'm not going to vote, with my dollar, that I am a higher species than anything else on this planet. And that includes choosing which animals live. And which animals die. Where freedom of choice has much broader consequences. I'm not going to eat an animal, just because they can dress it up with Special sauce. It's just blood-money on a mass scale.

We might never hear the truth come from the horses mouth, as it were; they're too big, and too powerful. Too many connections. This isn't a fight against Big Tobacco. This is a fight of the way that we live life, and the lives of the creatures that also inhabitant this planet. Tarnishing Her beauty, and strength with every passing day.

Thank you for sharing.

And please come back again, with any further information, and/or questions that you may have.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 04:36:13 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2015, 02:49:23 PM »
While I doubt I'll ever go strictly vegan/vegetarian, I've been debating trying to shift over to a primarily vegetarian lifestyle. I do have one particular concern, though...I've been trying to lose weight lately, and I'm a bit concerned that I would find it hard not to eat too many carbohydrates on a vegetarian diet. Do you have any suggestions of where to look for protein-heavy/low-carbohydrate vegetarian recipes that will keep you full?
That's awesome! I am glad that you are in the process of making a life-changing decision.

If you plan to switch over to this meal-plan, don't expect for the results to happen overnight, this isn't a lose weight in under 2 weeks diet/lifestyle. It could take months, depending what you're looking to achieve. Your body weight might stabilize for a moment, as your body naturally removes the chemicals from said meat-products from your body. As you begin to eat more, your metabolism will begin to speed up, and the fat will shrink away. These won't be easy results, though. It takes time.

Carbs don't make you fat. Fat makes you fat. "The fat that you eat, is the fat that you wear." The plant-based Vegan diet by Dr. Esselstyn is based off of is a high-carb, low fat regiment. And lifestyle. Carbs will lean you out. Another misconception, or lie. Is sugar, sugar doesn't make you fat. Pure sugar is not fatty. While I recommend not eating tablespoons full of refined sugar, as it would still be unhealthy, but don't let it fool you. Eat starches, legumes, beans, grain, all containing high protein, and carbs. And especially fruits, and vegetables, as your body needs sugar to survive. I do know a few recipes that I can share with you, but I first want to share with you what I ate, yesterday; these are FDA recommended goals for daily life, based at 100%.

http://prntscr.com/7ccuzt
http://prntscr.com/7ccvi3
http://prntscr.com/7ccvr2

Dr. Esselstyn has a very good book on Vegan recipes that I have, that you might look into. And information on healthy living. His guidelines are very strict, though. You don't have to follow them to a T, it's mainly just no animal-based products.

I had a recipe last night, chopped green, and red bell pepper, chopped pineapple, tofu; cooked, with two cups of streamed rice, mixed with vegetarian Asian curry.

In morning I usually have a cup of cooked oat, with, or without a banana. Or sometimes pancakes.

And during the day, I just make whatever suits me. I enjoy eating rice often, potatoes are good. I look through that cookbook, and see what I want to make.

Also, how do you manage eating out at restaurants without inconveniencing your friends? This is a particular concern of mine, because I know it drives me nuts when I'm eating with people and they refuse to eat at a bevy of different restaurants because of non-allergic concerns (this isn't meant to be offensive, and I hope it's not taken as such, it's just a legitimate concern of mine).
Of course! No one wishes to be put anyone into an awkward spot. Most restaurants cater to Vegan, and Vegetarian diets. But if the problem was them not providing such meals, than you might have to bite the bullet for one night, or you can prepare your own meal, beforehand. Most restaurants I've went to have catered to my diet. Not limited to, but including fast-food chains.

Thirdly, on a vegetarian diet is it absolutely necessary to supplement your diet with vitamins? I've been getting plenty of vitamins from my current diet and haven't needed to take other supplements, and I have to admit that I have some concern about switching to a diet that requires outside nutritional supplements to be sustainable.
I only take two supplements, B-12, and Vitamin C. There is a lot of discussion over if you actually need B-12 in a healthy diet to survive. But I'd better be safer, than sorry. I'd say B-12 is the only supplement that you would need to be worried about. As you saw, it was my lowest consumed number. Aside from sugars, starches, I ate some candy later, and had some potato chips. All you need for those is fruit, and starched-foods.

Finally, what have your experiences been with traveling internationally and maintaining a vegetarian/vegan diet? I travel quite often and I would be concerned about the sustainability of such a diet when traveling.
.
Most countries cater to a Vegan, and Vegetarian diet, more than the United States does. So I wouldn't be too worried. But if this problem does occur, I would say you would have to bite the bullet. I know that animal-based products can be quite the addiction, so I would be careful. Most countries will definitely provide the Vegan diet, though. If not all of them. United States being the country you should be most concerned while sticking to a meal plan.

Good day. Good luck. And safe travels!

Please come again, with further questions, and information.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 03:06:23 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2015, 03:36:31 PM »
I believe I took part in the largest conspiracy, and addiction known to our history as Man. The largest eradication of a species in our Human history. The most blood ever spilled. The largest amounts of pollution, deforestation, terrorism, slavery, and slaughter of a species in Human history. All so a few people in our world, can add a few more digits through a plastic screen. And line their suits with silk.

I decided I wasn't going to take part in it, anymore. Can you believe it? Someone who has never really had any major goals in his life, finally sees some clarity. I ate animals for 19 years, the later parts of those years, starting to learn what it was doing to my body, and knowing what I was eating. But it still didn't bother me, because, "It wasn't my cause. It didn't concern me. I know it's a dead chicken, but I don't care." The better part of my years in ignorance, and my parents, longer than that.

Manipulated, and lied to, to eat animals. It disgusts me beyond reason.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 03:39:03 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2015, 07:04:55 PM »
YouTube Videos - Gary Yourofsky



I recommend the B-12 supplement, if you just want to be safe.











« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 11:10:41 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2015, 07:33:15 PM »
Some helpful websites.

https://cronometer.com/?logout=true - Keep track of what you eat.

http://adaptt.org/ - Gary's website. Learn more.

http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/ - Dr. Esselstyn.


Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2015, 07:47:30 PM »
Some helpful Vegan YouTube channels -

Gary Yourofsky

Vegan Gains

Maple Blondie
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 07:48:53 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline TheChroniclesTopic starter

« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 08:27:33 PM by TheChronicles »

Offline Sho

Re: Healthy Living for Vegans, and Vegetarians; Friendly Chat.
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2015, 12:42:24 AM »
Thank you all for the info.

I'm not morally against killing animals, but I'm against the big meat farming industries. I'm fine with our family members who keep chickens in good conditions/hunt deer/slaughter their own cattle (I come from a family who keeps a large farm), but I have major moral problems with the way the vast majority of meat in this country is raised.

I appreciate all the info! :)