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Author Topic: US Drinking Age - Survey  (Read 3180 times)

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Offline DrayTopic starter

US Drinking Age - Survey
« on: March 28, 2011, 08:42:07 AM »
Alright so for my current English class, we have to write an argumentative paper and compile different various sources.  One of them must be a survey.  So here it is, a survey about the drinking age, more specifically - lowering it from 21 to 18 in the United States.  I would appreciate anyone who could take the time to fill it out.  You can give me a simple "Yes" or "No" for each question or answer it more thoroughly to support your answer and reasoning.

Quote
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?


3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?


4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?


5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?


6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?


7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)


8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?


9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?


10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?


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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2011, 09:11:57 AM »
I already have an opinion on this topic, and on most of the questions that are asked. However, if your assignment was to write a functional survey, you will need to edit some of your questions. They are riddled with confirmation bias.

1. No, but very seldom are things 'fair'.
2. No. Education is the key; the actual drinking age matters little.
3. Possibly. This one depends on how it's done.
4. No. I don't think that's why a lot of kids drink.
5. No. I think the prohibitive cost of drinking in bars, restaurants, and other public places forces them to buy cheap booze and drink at parties. (Common practice in my community.)
6. Yes. However, I think that younger kids also drink to feel more grown up, or because they see adults doing it. Monkey see, monkey do.
7. I think that this question is a little too complex for a simple yes or no answer.
8. No.
9. It's certainly not harmful, unless someone's a recovering alcoholic or intolerant or sommat.
10. No, I don't think it's unconstitutional.

Edit: Whoops, missed Q9.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 09:48:06 AM by Trieste »

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2011, 09:34:58 AM »
First, some background. I am one of the elderly folks on this board, one who actually remembers when the drinking age was 18 in my state. Thus, my experience influences my answers.


1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?

No, it is intrinsically unfair to discriminate against legal adults on this one issue alone.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?

In my opinion, it would not make a difference. I was in high school and college when the drinking age in my state rose from 18 to 21 (in a graduated fashion over a three year period). I still binge drank even though it was perfectly legal for me to purchase alcohol at the age of 18. Legal age or no, binge drinking is something you do when you are young and stupid (and occasionally old and stupid).

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?

In my opinion, no.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?

Possibly, yes. Although, I know I had absolutely no problem getting my hands on as much alcohol as I wanted, even before the age of 18. There wasn't much of a "thrill" about it, as it was commonplace. But this was back in the day, when it was much easier to fake an ID. With all the holograms and embedded information on a driver's license these days, I would suspect a fake ID is much less commonplace.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?

No. In my experience, most of my teen drinking (before and after the legal age of purchase) occurred in private homes.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?

Yes.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)

Yes.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?

Yes.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?

Across the board drinking (beer, wine, hard spirits)? No. 

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?

Yes. But I'm not an expert on constitutional law, so I have no basis for my argument, other that my opinion.


My older daughter will be spending three weeks in Europe this coming summer, in countries where the legal age to consume alcohol is 16. She turned 16 in February. She will have our (Mr. Torch and I) permission to drink if she so chooses.

Offline Serephino

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2011, 09:51:24 AM »
1. No, it's not fair.

2. Yes, it possibly could.

3. No.  Those who would be able to drink legally and then drive, already do so illegally.

4. Yes.  That, and they wouldn't have to hunt for someone to buy it for them, or wait for a party, so it would be less of a big deal.

5. Yes.

6. Yes.

7. Yes. *points to question #3* 

8. I'm not sure how expensive it is, but it is ineffective. 

9. Yes.  There are studies that show red wine in moderation is good for your heart.

10. I think it's discriminating, but I don't think I'd go as far as calling it unconstitutional.  As pointed out in question #1, at 18 we can buy cigarettes, join the military, get tattoos, and enter into binding contracts.  Alcohol is the only thing we have to wait longer for, and that seems a little silly.   

Offline grdell

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2011, 11:24:31 AM »
First, I feel the need to agree with Trieste that the survey itself is rife with confirmation bias. That being said, I will do my best to provide my honest opinions.

1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?

No, it is not fair.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?

One of the defining characteristics of teens is a tendency to indulge in extreme behavior. I do not believe that any amount of education will reduce the likelihood of binge drinking to any significant degree.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?

I fail to see any causal link between these. Driving while under the influence of alcohol is already illegal. Are the people that are likely to ignore these laws any more likely to adhere to laws pertaining to drinking age?

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?

Yes.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?

No.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?

Yes.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)

This question is essentially the same as #3 and my answer has not changed.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?

Better in what way? More effective? I doubt it - see my response to #2.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?

I do not feel comfortable agreeing with this generalization, as it seems to me like a justification for drinking alcohol at all by pointing out its health benefits; claims which are at best specious and at worst intentionally misleading. So my answer to this question must be no.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?

Absolutely not. The actual constitution does not prohibit discrimination based on age for anything other than voting.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 12:14:10 PM by grdell »

Offline Solstice

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2011, 01:16:33 PM »
Quote
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
No, it is not 'fair'. Arguably, there may be medical reasons (developmental health of the brain in late teens, according to some studies) to justify it, but from a legal standpoint, again, no.

Quote
2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
I believe that educating them about the dangers of irresponsible drinking would help; I do not believe that lowering the drinking age would.

Quote
3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
No. Almost anyone who wants to drink illegally can do so already. Being able to contact parents, co-workers, etc. for a ride home (or to the next bar) without risk of being 'turned in' to the police would give people who are already drinking a way to not get someone killed via drunk driving, regardless of whether or not they used it.

Quote
4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
Yes. However, this does not take into account people in that age range who do not presently drink, but would if it was legal.

Quote
5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
Yes.

Quote
6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
Yes, particularly since it is separate from all the other aspects of legal adulthood.

Quote
7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
Yes. There is absolutely nothing which can be reasonably be done to prevent people from drinking (see: prohibition), and so there is no law which could be passed that would fully eliminate alcohol-related traffic casualties.

Quote
8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
Yes.

Quote
9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
I am extremely hesitant to answer this question. The best I can offer is, "In some circumstances, yes." Although certain studies have discussed the health benefits of mild alcohol consumption, I do not feel personally qualified to answer that question.

Quote
10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
Discrimination in and of itself is not unconstitutional. While this law may be discriminatory, it is not unconstitutional.

Offline Will

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2011, 02:29:58 PM »
I'll add my bit.

Quote
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
Not fair, no.

Quote
2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Yes.  A more accepting attitude among adults, along with an emphasis on responsibility would go a long way towards helping kids make better decisions.


Quote
3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
Just lowering the drinking age?  Of course, it would surely raise it.  You have to educate them, too, or you'll just have more kids with more freedom to drink, who then do stupid things like driving.


Quote
4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
I don't think breaking the law has much at all to do with underage drinking.  Teens do it because other teens do it.  They do it because it looks like fun.  They want to fit in, and have fun.  Teenagers aren't that complex, I promise.  They just want you to think they are. :P


Quote
5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
First of all, do I "agree?"  This question in particular has some wording issues.  I'm not sure which bars and restaurants you've been to, but you can still get into trouble in public just fine.  More importantly, as Trieste said, teenagers don't have the kind of money it takes to go out clubbing.  Drinks, food, and tips are expensive, and that's before you black out and spend everything else without realizing it.  So, they would still likely buy their own bottles/beer and hang out in private, even if they had other options.


Quote
6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
Again with the agreeing. XD  I can't discount a desire for maturity entirely as a motivation, but again, I don't think it's the overriding one.  The last thing I thought about when I was in high school, dry heaving off of some kid's patio, was "ZOMG I feel like such an adult!  Hot damn!  Somebody get this grown ass man a towel!"


Quote
7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
No way we can prevent casualties?  Of course not.  Education and open discussion is crucial.  This question is really confusing, though.


Quote
8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
Yes.  I agree. :P


Quote
9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
No.  But life is terminal, and all that.


Quote
10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
Yeah, probably.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 02:57:36 PM by Will »

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2011, 02:54:45 PM »
Quote
However, if your assignment was to write a functional survey, you will need to edit some of your questions. They are riddled with confirmation bias.

Before I answer, this needs to be echoed.  Your data is likely going to be skewed based on your wording.  Has the instructor reviewed these questions?  I ask merely because I hope you won't get burned for "stacking the deck" toward a certain bias.

Also, I teach 16 to 20 year-old students in high school, so my profession is likely to make me bias as well.

1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?

I'll say no, but I don't think "fairness" is an important matter here.  If one makes any of those decisions listed and available at 18, one should be entirely sober given that humans' brains in the areas related to decision making are not fully developed until the early to mid-twenties.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?

No.  Education would help, but not lowering the drinking age.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?

Yes.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?

No.  Getting intoxicated is thrilling enough.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?

No.  Adults over 21 drink in public and still hurt themselves and over-drink often.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?

No.  From my experience as a former teen and a high school teacher, getting drunk is nothing about seeming mature and mostly about getting stupid "shitfaced" drunk.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)

Yes.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?

No.  The same time and money would be spent prosecuting minors.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?

Yes.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?

Likely, if one presses the matter legally.  There are many things and acts that are currently illegal which those who choose to indulge in them would cry "discrimination".

Offline RP7466

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2011, 03:19:09 PM »
I don't think the drinking age matters as it relates to DUI's and accidents. And i agree that binge drinking is just a dumb thing we do sometimes. I agree more with some of the European laws about drinking in the home. I also think bars should be located in "alcohol districts" with some sort of small police station right in the center, so that it is easier for police to patrol the areas. Not a full sized city department, but more of a DUI post/taskforce. I think people, even when drunk, would be less likely to think they would make it home without getting pulled over if they knew that they would be driving by a patrol car on the way home. I also think that there should be a Breathalyzer right at the bar. When you get to the bar you hand your keys to the doorman, and you don't get them back if you don't blow under the legal limit. Maybe a drunktank in the station, not just for people who are arested, but if they don't have a ride home. Wouldn't need to feed them, just a cot, and some water. you don't care where you sleep when you're drunk.

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2011, 03:48:44 PM »
I also think that there should be a Breathalyzer right at the bar. When you get to the bar you hand your keys to the doorman, and you don't get them back if you don't blow under the legal limit. Maybe a drunktank in the station, not just for people who are arested, but if they don't have a ride home. Wouldn't need to feed them, just a cot, and some water. you don't care where you sleep when you're drunk.

I really like this idea.  Also, I know that some habitual DUI offenders have had their cars fitted with an ignition-switch interrupting Breathalyzer - if you blow over the limit, the engine won't turn over.  Imagine making that more readily available.

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2011, 04:08:20 PM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
No it is not fair. If you are considered an adult in other areas of life then why not this area as well.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
I think that underage drinking could be cut by a great deal if the legal age was lowered. Education is vital but when the taboo is taken away I think some of the rebellious aspects are taken away too.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
No, because kids who want to drink already do it. If they do it legally then they will most likely do it responsibly. When forced to do it illegally they are more likely to over do it since they don't know when they will get the opportunity again.


4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
As I stated above, yes.


5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
Yes, I think since they are doing it anyway letting them have the freedom to do it responsibly gives them the choice which as an adult isn't that what makes us who we are as adults, the choices we make?

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
I don't think it makes it seem mature. I think anytime you tell young people anything is off limits it makes it something they feel the need to explore. Maturity, in my opinion, doesn't play a role.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
Since not all accidents are caused by underage drinkers, I find it hard to believe that the shift in age will have any effect on the casualties.


8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
I think that not shifting the drinking age can be far more expensive in the long run than if it is changed. When young people drink in secret it could become a habit which could induce them into alcoholism. That is a far higher price to pay than shifting the change of the legal drinking age.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
I don't know if drinking can be good or bad for your health.


10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
No it is not discriminating. I think it is old fashioned and therefore should be adjusted to the times.

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2011, 04:10:54 PM »
I really like this idea.  Also, I know that some habitual DUI offenders have had their cars fitted with an ignition-switch interrupting Breathalyzer - if you blow over the limit, the engine won't turn over.  Imagine making that more readily available.

I could foresee issues with unlawful search and seizure as well as unlawful detainment.  There's an understanding that being a habitual drunk driver is probable cause, but is simply being in a bar or over 21 probable cause?

Anyway, sorry to derail the thread a bit. 

Offline Torch

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2011, 05:01:37 PM »
I really like this idea.  Also, I know that some habitual DUI offenders have had their cars fitted with an ignition-switch interrupting Breathalyzer - if you blow over the limit, the engine won't turn over.  Imagine making that more readily available.

How would you limit it (the Breathalyzer in a bar) to drivers only, though? I've discussed the issue of underage drinking with Mr. Torch, and in his experience growing up in Brooklyn, NY, underage drinking and driving was never a problem. Why? Because everyone walked everywhere (or took public transportation). If you got shitfaced at a bar or at a party, you walked home...or rather, stumbled.

Offline Jude

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2011, 05:09:20 PM »
1.  I'm not categorically against age-based restrictions and regulations, so yes, I think it's "fair."
2.  Given that many adults do not drink responsibly, I don't know why anyone would think treating people under 21 like adults would generate good results.
3.   I don't know.
4.   I doubt it, people still make a big deal about drinking post 21 too.  It's a mindset of thrill-seeking and recklessness that embodies youth.
5.   Seems like a false premise.  People often drink too much in bars as well.
6.   I don't think alcohol is largely associated with maturity; moderation is maturity.  Alcohol is pretty much universally associated with the effects of drunkenness, and an individual's take on that state often determines their outlook on alcohol.  Drunkness is largely associated with excess and poor self control, which are signs of immaturity.  I do not know anyone who thinks of being drunk as mature.
7.   I don't know.
8.   People often like to bring up the "education" card, acting as if a bit of information will result in people behaving responsibly.  The thing is, what is there to educate people on when it comes to alcohol that would result in a total turnaround?  I think pretty much everyone knows what's important about alcohol.  Learning the ways that it's created, its rich history, or other intricate details isn't going to keep people safe.  Facts only go so far, especially when the individuals in question that you're dealing with suffer from a lack of impulse control to begin with.
9.   It hardly matters what anyone thinks aside from a person who's done properly controlled studies on the matter; this is a scientific question, and the answer is that yes, it can (at least from the studies I've seen, before I'd be willing to give a stronger answer, I'd need to review the literature).
10.   No more than setting the age of adulthood at 18 is discriminating against a 16 year old that wants to be an adult.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 05:28:36 PM by Jude »

Offline TheLovelyMaid

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2011, 05:18:16 PM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
More than fair.  I can die for my country, but I can't have a beer? That's ridiculous.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Yes.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
I think it would stay the exact same as it is now. Were they increased for our parents, who were 18 when they could drink?

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
Yes.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
Yes. Yes, I do. 

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
Yes.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
I think one has just as much chance at 21 as at 18 to cause a traffic casualty.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
Yes.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
There are studies that show that. A glass of red wine at dinner every day can improve heart health.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
Yes.

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2011, 05:54:41 PM »
How would you limit it (the Breathalyzer in a bar) to drivers only, though? I've discussed the issue of underage drinking with Mr. Torch, and in his experience growing up in Brooklyn, NY, underage drinking and driving was never a problem. Why? Because everyone walked everywhere (or took public transportation). If you got shitfaced at a bar or at a party, you walked home...or rather, stumbled.

How?  Simply put, the ones who don't drive wouldn't have car keys to reclaim.  I know of people who do something similar (although not nearly as scientifically) with house parties, by having a place for drivers to put their keys until they were ready to go, at which point the host makes a determination of how drunk they are before handing the keys back.

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Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2011, 08:38:39 PM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
No, it's not fair.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Yes, education goes a long way to preventing things.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
No, again with education, many of those things could prevent accidents. It's not as if the age limit prevents drinking anyways.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
I feel that's a big reason that people do it, so yes, I believe that with the taboo removed, the 'thrill' of drinking underage is also taken away.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
I would say that it's a big part of it.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
No I think they see it as just something taken away from them, something wrong and so it's something to do to stick it to authority figures.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
As I stated, it will happen if it's going to happen. They still drink and will continue to drink. It's not going to stop the accidents that will happen, people will always make bad decisions. So no, no matter what they do, the accidents will still happen.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
Definitely.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
It's been shown that in moderation, beer and red wine can be good for someone. So yes.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
Definitely, you have all other rights at that age, alcohol should not be taken from you either.

Offline ExisD

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2011, 10:49:06 PM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
No, it is very unfair, but not likely to change any time soon.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Yes, this was the method my parents and several friends parents used. It taught us to respect alcohol and use it properly.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
I think their would be a brief spike, maybe a year's worth, followed by an over all reduction.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
Yes, I know many people who stopping drinking as much when they came of age because it was less exciting.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
Yes, they will drink and they will do it without proper supervision.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
No, it sends a message of you're not supposed to do this just because, which many instinctively rebel against.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
Yes, people will be irresponsible no matter their age.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
Yes, I believe that this would create a better and safer environment for everyone.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
Yes, not every type of alcohol can be good for ones health, but several can.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
I think it is discriminatory, but not unconstitutional.

Online Doomsday

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2011, 01:00:52 AM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?

No, I do not. I think it should be all 21, or all 18.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?

I think the mystique of illegality is half of the appeal to binge drinking. I could see the numbers of binge drinking going down, but not by a whole lot. So yes, I think it could work.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?

Sadly, I think it's a certainty.


4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?

Well by default, if you made it legal to drink by 18 there would be less laws broken. I don't think underage drinkers get a thrill to break any law, just that one in particular. Oddly worded question, hard to answer. Yes?


5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?

Obviously if they can't drink in a bar or restaurant then they have to drink in a private place like a home. I don't think it makes them more prone to getting hurt, but perhaps more prone to drinking too much. So I guess, by that logic, yes.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?

I would say the overall message behind underage prohibition is "We can't trust you to not kill everyone in a drunken stupor, and you'll stunt your growth/or something". So yes.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)

Even if every drop of alcohol was removed from this planet and we could never make any more, we still would have traffic casualties. So yes. However this seems like a loaded question. It sort of says "Traffic accidents happen, so let them happen". This isn't a binary solution of 'traffic accidents or no traffic accidents', if we can reduce fatal collisions, then so be it.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol? "Expensive" and "ineffective" are just fluff to me without any evidence. Would states really be saving money if the drinking age was lowered?

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?

A positive to someone's health? I can't say, I'm not a doctor. Of course, drinking in moderation is much better than binging, so I guess a neutral is better than a negative, so yes.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?

What's the difference between 18 and 17? Why won't we let 16 year olds drink? Isn't that discrimination? My answer to your original question is no.

Offline DrayTopic starter

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2011, 09:45:14 PM »
I know this survey is biased - I have a few different ones pertaining to the same topic floating around the internet right now, this is one that leans to one side.  Just trying to see what different answers I can come up with.  Thanks for the help.

Offline Funguy81

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2011, 06:47:43 AM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
Not really, but things are as they are.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Nope, and i seen it first hand when i was in Korea in 2002 to 2003. The legal drinking age at the time for american soldiers was 20. You be surprised the number of alcohal related incidents at the time caused by those under 21 compared to everyone else.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
that i cant say. I think its possible.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
it would remove the taboo and thrill of it yes.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
they are just as likely to hurt themselves in bars and restaurants as drinking unsupervised.

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
no i dont. Drinking alcohal is as much of a sign of maturity as watching porn. its just something to do for enjoyment.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
changing the drinking age wont change the rate of traffic casualties.

8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
we already spend the money and time educating the youth on alcohal. If they havent listened now, the change in age wont make a difference.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
it has shown that wine does indeed help one's health.

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
if thats true, you might as well lower the drinking age below 18 because that could be considered discrimination for teenagers.

Online Doomsday

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2011, 08:02:40 PM »
I know this survey is biased - I have a few different ones pertaining to the same topic floating around the internet right now, this is one that leans to one side.  Just trying to see what different answers I can come up with.  Thanks for the help.

Is it designed to be biased? If not you might be losing some points on your final grade.

Offline paraplu

Re: US Drinking Age - Survey
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2011, 03:09:20 AM »
1.     Do you believe it is fair that the drinking age is set to 21, when adulthood is achieved at 18?  At 18 you can vote, serve on juries, get married, sign contracts, join the military, be prosecuted as an adult, and buy tobacco, so why not alcohol?
Given the fact that alcohol is a hard drug, I don't see it as unfair.

2.   Many teens (underage drinkers) get in trouble because they end up binge drinking, do you think that lowering the age and education them and teaching them to drink responsible could work?
Possibly, although education is a largely wasted effort, it is a fact that marihuana abuse in my country isn't nearly as drastic as it is in the US. Being legal is a factor that comes into play here. Not being illegal makes people less likely to do it in protest over recreational purposes, which could probably stretch towards alcohol a fair bit.

3.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age will increase the number of traffic fatalities?
Nah.

4.   Do you think that lowering the drinking age could remove it as a taboo to those between 18 and 21, thus lowering the thrill to break a law?
Yes.

5.   Do you agree that by prohibiting teens from drinking in bars, restaurants and other public places forces them to drink in unsupervised places where they are prone to get hurt or drink too much?
Well, it isn't uncommon for teens to wager with one another. There are plenty places I know of that don't serve to the intoxicated, which in that sense is good for a sort of control (it can be gotten around easily, but not if all your friends want to stay at the same club)

6.   Do you agree that keeping a higher drinking age sends a message that consuming alcohol is a sign of maturity, thus teens want to consume it to seem mature?
Could see the reasoning behind that statement. Wouldn't go so far as putting my full support behind the statement, as; mature + binge drinking = horribly twisted vision of what is mature.

7.   Do you believe that no matter what age the drinking age shifts to, there is no way we can prevent traffic casualties?  (As in, moving the drinking age up from 18 to 21 just shifted the risk from teens to young adults, therefore it does not matter what the age is as anyone can suffer from alcohol related accidents)
No, there is always a solution, but shifting the drinking age isn't one of them.


8.   Keeping the drinking age at 21 can be expensive, yet also ineffective.  Would you agree that it would be better to shift attention away from the age of 21, lower it to 18, and then spend the time and money on educating the youth about alcohol?
We have our drinking age set at 16 for things like beer, wine and other lighter drinks, whereas you need to be 18 to buy a bottle of whiskey. Then again, drinking is more our culture than it is yours, but we don't nearly have the same trouble because... Well most twenty-somethings still don't overdo it. England, on the other hand, also is rather loose in its restrictions but has some big problems with binge drinking.

9.   Do you think that drinking in moderation, without over doing it, can be good for one’s health?
Based on what scientific statement?

10.   Do you think that setting the age to 21 is discriminating, therefore unconstitutional, to those from 18 to 20 since they cannot drink?
Only if you're black! (stupid question, stupid answer. Of course not)