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Author Topic: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~  (Read 27384 times)

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Offline Kit Cat

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #300 on: July 30, 2018, 10:22:05 AM »
Congratulations!

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #301 on: August 01, 2018, 04:56:52 AM »
Some additional info for our wonderful word of the day.

Did You Know?

During the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars (1796-1815), the French dominated Italy and introduced many new reforms to the Italian states. After the wars, the states were restored to their former rulers, the Austrians, and took on a conservative character. In response, a number of secret societies arose as part of an ideological and literary movement in support of a united Italy free of foreign domination. This movement was given the name Risorgimento, which literally translates from Italian as "rising again." Although most modern use of the term still refers to this movement, the word also has broader application in English, referring to revivals or renewals of any sort. This second sense is occasionally capitalized in a nod to the earlier use.

Offline Kit Cat

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #302 on: August 01, 2018, 08:06:25 AM »
Some additional info for our wonderful word of the day.

Did You Know?

During the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars (1796-1815), the French dominated Italy and introduced many new reforms to the Italian states. After the wars, the states were restored to their former rulers, the Austrians, and took on a conservative character. In response, a number of secret societies arose as part of an ideological and literary movement in support of a united Italy free of foreign domination. This movement was given the name Risorgimento, which literally translates from Italian as "rising again." Although most modern use of the term still refers to this movement, the word also has broader application in English, referring to revivals or renewals of any sort. This second sense is occasionally capitalized in a nod to the earlier use.

One thing I love about these words of the day, is being able to learn the history behind it too! It also gave me a great idea on how to use that and the rest of the ones I needed to catch up on, so can't thank you enough  :-)

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #303 on: August 04, 2018, 07:46:02 AM »
I agree. Even though I don't participate as much, it's great to read those little snippets. I've been learning a lot. xD

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #304 on: August 05, 2018, 09:19:02 AM »
I've discovered that I've been saying a rather embrassing amount of words wrong thanks to the WotD  :-[  Ahh well.  Live and learn :D

In other news...





CONGRATULATIONS

persephone 325
&
Jaclyn

You've made it into E's WotD Hall of Fame!




Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #305 on: August 06, 2018, 05:03:04 AM »
Did You Know?

In the Islamic tradition, a mufti is a professional jurist who interprets Muslim law. When religious muftis were portrayed on the English stage in the early 19th century, they typically wore costumes that included a dressing gown and a tasseled cap—an outfit that some felt resembled the clothing preferred by the off-duty military officers of the day. The clothing sense of mufti, which first appeared in English around that same time, is thought to have developed out of this association of stage costume and civilian clothing.

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #306 on: August 08, 2018, 05:52:10 AM »
I haven't had the time to give feedback to everyone's contributions but I'm always super glad too see people posting in WoTD. I hope you're learning new words and using them often! 💝🌟


Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #307 on: August 09, 2018, 05:55:02 AM »
Did You Know?

If weald were a tree, it would have many annual rings. It has been in use as a general word for "forest" since the days of Old English, and it has also long been used, in its capitalized form, as a geographic name for a once-heavily forested region of southeast England. Weald is also often capitalized today when used to refer to wooded areas like the Weald of Kent and the Weald of Sussex in England. In time, the word branched out to designate any wild and uncultivated upland regions. A related word is wold, meaning "an upland plain or stretch of rolling land."

Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #308 on: August 09, 2018, 06:00:39 AM »
"Weald" and "wold."  "Weal" (healthy/prosperous) and "woe" (misfortune.)  Might some fun to be had there with the alliteration and use of opposites.

And to add further depth the word of the day, "weald" is connected to the modern German word of "Walt," meaning "forest."

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #309 on: August 09, 2018, 06:03:30 AM »
I feel super slow because I've never heard of it. xD

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #310 on: August 10, 2018, 06:04:21 AM »
A brand new word for our Wordofthedayians! It isn't too awful either.

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #311 on: August 10, 2018, 06:34:31 AM »
Yas! -hoards all da words-

Offline Kit Cat

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #312 on: August 10, 2018, 03:51:47 PM »
Now campaigning to have vivisepulture as a word of a day, so I can claim it! Couldn't resist using it tonight  ;D

Also, congrats Jaclyn and Persephone 325 for reaching the Hall of Fame  :D

Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #313 on: August 10, 2018, 03:58:47 PM »
And it was well used, I must say!!

Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #314 on: August 10, 2018, 06:16:58 PM »
More poetry!!  *swoons* Thank you, Belle33!!

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #315 on: August 10, 2018, 06:18:23 PM »
Now campaigning to have vivisepulture as a word of a day, so I can claim it! Couldn't resist using it tonight  ;D

Also, congrats Jaclyn and Persephone 325 for reaching the Hall of Fame  :D

I had to google it. xD I was like what does this mean. >.>

Offline Kit Cat

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #316 on: August 10, 2018, 06:25:24 PM »
More poetry!!  *swoons* Thank you, Belle33!!

Woots! The Poems are taking over!

Really nice one, Belle33

Offline Belle33

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #317 on: August 12, 2018, 04:01:43 PM »
Woots! The Poems are taking over!

Really nice one, Belle33


Thanks Kit Cat - and for everyone encouraging participation.  This is a great way to dip my toe back into writing.

My most recent entry is intentionally provocative, and is not written in my own voice -I hope that's clear :)

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #318 on: August 13, 2018, 04:57:09 AM »
This is an odd one. Here's more info.

Did You Know?

"In Troy, there lies the scene. From Isles of Greece / The princes orgulous, their high blood chaf'd, / Have to the port of Athens sent their ships." Thus William Shakespeare begins the Trojan War tale Troilus and Cressida, employing orgulous, a colorful word first adopted in the 13th century from Anglo-French orguillus. After the Bard's day, orgulous dropped from sight for 200 years; there is no record of its use until it was rejuvenated by the pens of Robert Southey and Sir Walter Scott in the early 1800s. 20th-century authors (including James Joyce and W. H. Auden) continued its renaissance, and it remains an elegant (if infrequent) choice for today's writers.

Offline Belle33

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #319 on: August 14, 2018, 07:50:02 PM »
Liam's gift today is a good one.  "Harbinger of terror and fire."  Why can't I write like that!?

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #320 on: August 14, 2018, 09:28:43 PM »
Thank you Belle ♥

Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #321 on: August 16, 2018, 06:39:28 AM »
Did You Know?

Volatile was originally for the birds—quite literally. Back in the 14th century, volatile was a noun that referred to birds (especially wild fowl) or other winged creatures, such as butterflies. That's not as flighty as it sounds. Volatile traces back to the Latin verb volare, which means "to fly." By the end of the 16th century, people were using volatile as an adjective for things that were so light they seemed ready to fly. The adjective was soon extended to vapors and gases, and by the early 17th century, volatile was being applied to individuals or things as prone to sudden change as some gaseous substances. In recent years, volatile has landed in economic, political, and technical contexts far flown from its avian origins.

Offline Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #322 on: August 16, 2018, 06:40:04 AM »
Loving the poetry, folks!! Making feel a little inspired myself!

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #323 on: August 16, 2018, 07:19:58 AM »
Oooh. That's a lengthy definition today.

Offline Flower

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #324 on: August 20, 2018, 04:44:55 AM »
A little knowledge drop for interested folk.

Did You Know?

There is an interesting time lag between the appearance of imperturbable and its antonym, perturbable. Although imperturbable is known to have existed since the middle of the 15th century, perturbable didn't show up in written English until 1800. The verb perturb (meaning "to disquiet" or "to throw into confusion") predates both imperturbable and perturbable; it has been part of English since the 14th century. All three words derive from Latin perturbare (also meaning "to throw into confusion"), which in turn comes from the combination of per- (meaning "thoroughly") and turbare, which means "to disturb." Other relatives of imperturbable include disturb and turbid.


Did You Know?

You may have accurately guessed that satiety is related to satisfy, satiate (meaning "to satisfy fully or to excess"), and sate (which means "to glut" or "to satisfy to the full"). Satiety, along with the others, ultimately comes from the Latin word satis, which means "enough." English speakers apparently couldn't get enough of satis- derived words in the 15th and 16th centuries, when all of these words entered the language. Satiety itself was borrowed into English in the mid-1500s from the Middle French word satieté of the same meaning.