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Author Topic: Using a router  (Read 423 times)

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Offline ladyelizabethTopic starter

Using a router
« on: October 05, 2013, 01:13:16 AM »
Ok, so the issue with having so many people in my house is there are a lot of things that run off the internet.  We bought a router and run WiFi throughout the house.  We sometimes have multiple equipment online at the same time.  We often run into the issue of IP conflicts.  It is annoying!  I'm not sure why this happens.

For example, before the current economic downturn we were lucky enough to afford to get at least a "cheap" computer for each person in the house.  My husband and I got Iphones (which we later regretted), and my niece moved in with laptop.  *sigh*  too many electronics.   The positive about the Iphone is even without the service we can still use the Iphone on the internet as a mini computer through the WiFi. 

The problem is our IP's all show up the same.  I've looked them up on several of the machines and they all appear the same. Is there a way to get this changed?  Is it even the reason for the conflicts?  UGH.  It is confusing and a bit concerning.  I'm not sure if I should be calling the cable company or fixing something from home.  I hate calling Time Warner, I always get the "Hello can I help you, my name is Bob"

Any idea?  This is because my mom likes to play Farmville 2  (Oh don't even get me started) and her computer keeps popping up with IP address conflicts.  I was thinking it was facebook, but I'm just not sure.   I can build a computer, just not so tech savvy with networks and the such. 

Offline Izu

Re: Using a router
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2013, 02:22:42 AM »
A couple of questions - has it always been like this or it is a recent problem? And can you access your router's admin as we might need to reconfigure some stuff? And is there a scenario where 2+ people can get connected to the internet without problems or it is always one person at a time?

Offline russ

Re: Using a router
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2013, 05:04:06 AM »
Routers will usually give out IP addresses via what is know as 'DHCP'. This means that each device should be each given an address each from the pool of addresses but it sounds like they're giving out the same address.

Are the addresses 192.168.x.x? This means they're from the 'private' range of addresses and what should be used on the inside of a home network so that's a good start at least, but if they've got a more random address then it sounds like they're being given the same 'public' address and there lies your problem and you'll need to do some configuring on the router.

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Re: Using a router
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2013, 05:26:19 AM »
To the outside world, you all have the same IP (the IP address of your modem, or your router that functions as a modem).  That's not what causes your problems.

I run a home wired/wireless network with a large number of devices (like 15), and I find that network IP address (192.168.x.x) conflicts happen most often with machines that go to sleep or (especially) hibernate, like laptops.  I don't have a an I-Phone so I don't know if they do that or not. 

What happens with laptops is that they go to sleep with a  network IP in memory, but by their sleeping the router forgets they're there, so it can reassign the same number to a device that boots up fresh. Then when the laptop wakes up, looking of the same address, it causes a conflict.    The solution is relatively straight forward, at least on my network.  You turn off and then restart the device that is showing up with the conflict, and it picks up a new address.  Just rebooting won't necessarily release the previously held IP; turning the device completely off usually does.

It can also happen when a printer directly on the network gets turned off, and back on (depending on the printer and how it is connected to the network), as network printers tend to remember their assigned IP (because that's how print jobs are addressed to them) and try to grab it back.  If another device has booted up in the meantime and taken that address, that causes a conflict.  In that case, you should turn off and restart the other device claimng the IP, rather than the printer.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2013, 05:47:02 AM by Geraint »

Offline ladyelizabethTopic starter

Re: Using a router
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2013, 11:50:03 AM »
A couple of questions - has it always been like this or it is a recent problem? And can you access your router's admin as we might need to reconfigure some stuff? And is there a scenario where 2+ people can get connected to the internet without problems or it is always one person at a time?

It happened in the past but cleared up for a long time.  It is now happening again and definitely much more often than before.  I do have access to the router's admin.  It does happen where there are 2+ people online then all of a sudden the next person has the conflict.  Though it does happen mostly to a wireless person. 

Routers will usually give out IP addresses via what is know as 'DHCP'. This means that each device should be each given an address each from the pool of addresses but it sounds like they're giving out the same address.

Are the addresses 192.168.x.x? This means they're from the 'private' range of addresses and what should be used on the inside of a home network so that's a good start at least, but if they've got a more random address then it sounds like they're being given the same 'public' address and there lies your problem and you'll need to do some configuring on the router.
The IP address being given starts with a 173.  so I think its the same public address. 

To the outside world, you all have the same IP (the IP address of your modem, or your router that functions as a modem).  That's not what causes your problems.

I run a home wired/wireless network with a large number of devices (like 15), and I find that network IP address (192.168.x.x) conflicts happen most often with machines that go to sleep or (especially) hibernate, like laptops.  I don't have a an I-Phone so I don't know if they do that or not. 

What happens with laptops is that they go to sleep with a  network IP in memory, but by their sleeping the router forgets they're there, so it can reassign the same number to a device that boots up fresh. Then when the laptop wakes up, looking of the same address, it causes a conflict.    The solution is relatively straight forward, at least on my network.  You turn off and then restart the device that is showing up with the conflict, and it picks up a new address.  Just rebooting won't necessarily release the previously held IP; turning the device completely off usually does.

It can also happen when a printer directly on the network gets turned off, and back on (depending on the printer and how it is connected to the network), as network printers tend to remember their assigned IP (because that's how print jobs are addressed to them) and try to grab it back.  If another device has booted up in the meantime and taken that address, that causes a conflict.  In that case, you should turn off and restart the other device claimng the IP, rather than the printer.

This actually makes a lot of sense because it stopped a long time ago and then when my niece moved in she has a computer that she puts to sleep a lot.  It could be the conflict with that IP versus my mom getting on the internet.  I didn't even think about a sleeping computer.  I thought it reset the IP not kept it.  Okay, that makes much more sense.

Offline GothicFires

Re: Using a router
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2013, 12:25:09 PM »
It has been a long time since i have done it, but if you need to there should be a way to assign a computer with a static internal ip. It may involved the name of the computer or the mac address. All i remember is that I have done it before for work and our computers had the same internal ip number every time we booted our computer.