You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 09, 2016, 07:39:44 AM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars  (Read 902 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline VekseidTopic starter

NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« on: November 29, 2007, 07:56:39 AM »
For 2031

Quote from: article
Nasa has released details of its strategy for sending a human crew to Mars within the next few decades.

The US space agency envisages despatching a "minimal" crew on a 30-month round trip to the Red Planet in a 400,000kg (880,000lb) spacecraft.

Details of the concept were outlined at a meeting in Houston, Texas.

In January 2004, President George W Bush launched a programme for returning humans to the Moon by 2020 and - at an undetermined date - to Mars.

The "Mars ship" would be assembled in low-Earth orbit using three to four Ares V rockets - the new heavy-lift launch vehicle that Nasa has been developing.

Notionally despatched in February 2031, the mission's journey from Earth to Mars would take six to seven months in a spacecraft powered by an advanced cryogenic fuel propulsion system.

Estimates of the cost of mounting a manned Mars mission vary enormously, from $20bn to $450bn.

The details are highly subject to change, and may not represent the way Nasa eventually chooses to go to the Red Planet.

However, the document says this is the agency's current "best strategy" for landing humans on the Martian surface.

Grow your own

The cargo lander and surface habitat would be sent to Mars separately, launched before the crew in December 2028 and January 2029.

According to the Nasa presentation seen by BBC News, astronauts could grow their own fruit and vegetables on the way.

Ares V Earth Departure Stage (artist's impression). Image: Nasa
The "Mars-ship" would be assembled in Earth orbit
Once there, astronauts could spend up to 16 months on the Martian surface, and would use nuclear energy to power their habitat.

But the document points out that options for aborting the mission or furnishing the crew with new supplies would be extremely limited.

The difficulties of re-supply mean the astronauts would have to be remarkably self-sufficient.

They would need to be well-versed in the maintenance and repair of equipment and perhaps even able to manufacture new parts.

Recycled water

The spacecraft itself would be equipped with so-called "closed-loop" life support systems, in which air and water would be recycled.

Plants would be grown onboard to feed the crew and contribute to the "psychological health" of the astronauts.

But the report, authored by Nasa official Bret Drake, who sits on the agency's Robotic and Human Lunar Expeditions Strategic Roadmap Committee, says that many challenges remain for ensuring safe passage for the crew.

Nasa needs to come up with solutions for effectively protecting the astronauts from the high levels of cosmic radiation they will be exposed to in deep space and on the surface of Mars.

They will also need medical equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses or injuries.

Nasa proposes using the Moon as a testing ground for many of these new systems.

Details of the plan, which comes under Nasa's new Constellation programme, were presented at a meeting of Nasa's Lunar Exploration and Analysis Group.

Offline Brandon

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2007, 11:32:49 AM »
Interesting. I have to say though wouldnt it make more sense to develop a base on the moon first and use it as a test phase of sorts for the Mars trip? That way they could observe the supply issue with far less chance of loss of life from lack of supplies. That just seems to make more sense to me

Offline VekseidTopic starter

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2007, 12:03:40 PM »
Interesting. I have to say though wouldnt it make more sense to develop a base on the moon first and use it as a test phase of sorts for the Mars trip? That way they could observe the supply issue with far less chance of loss of life from lack of supplies. That just seems to make more sense to me

This expands on the 2020 moon mission, I believe. Which already has shown some pretty kickass results.

Offline RubySlippers

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2007, 12:08:40 PM »
I'm a taxpayer and am totally opposed to our government throwing away good money on this fiasco or even NASA. If there is money to be made the free market and business will exploit the situation I say let the Air Force take over the military uses of the technology to launch satellites and whathaveyou. And end this entire venture in space save for simple commercial applications and some scientific ones if privately funded.

That international space station is a joke anyway WE as the United States are putting in most of the funding some INTERNATIONAL project.

As for the cost estimates lets see they say on the hiogh end $450 billion, add another 50% to that and you may get the actual costs. You know how much low cost housing or schools you could build for that kind of money? Or what about paying down our national debt that would be a nice thing to. What a bunch of stupid people wasting my money and yours if a US citizen on some hair-brained idiotic plan.

As for returning to the moon what the hell for there is nothing there worth anything, and there was no reason to go before during the Cold War.


Offline VekseidTopic starter

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2007, 01:07:06 PM »
There's a reason we're paying to keep the Soviet space program afloat. Considering your previous posts, I'm surprised you don't already know of that one, very, very excellent reason. We don't need to be compromising all or the rest of the world's security for the sake of letting Russian rocket scientists going hungry.

That's ignoring the technological push such government programs give these industries. The Apollo missions alone - just them - were responsible for accelerating the development of computing technology by over a decade. You would not be typing on that computer, nor talking on that cell phone, nor would there be an Elliquiy to have these roleplays in the first place without the Apollo program.

The money spent figuring out how to purify water faster, better, and cheaper for an extended Lunar or Martian mission does not just vanish. That money gets utilized down here on Earth amidst billions of people who risk dying of thirst over the next half century.

And that's just one project.

Offline Brandon

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2007, 01:10:07 PM »
Ah, gotcha. Thanks for that Veksied I wasnt sure if this was an entirly new project or not.

Anyway, Ruby I see where you are coming from but honestly I think its about that time in mankinds development where we need to start considering exploration of other planets and our solar system. Frankly I think creating a working colony on the moon is a challenge that we really need. However, I agree that with some of these so called international projects we need to cut some spending and pay our fair share rather then the majority of it though. If those projects fail, they fail and we can put that extra money back into the citizen's or military development

Offline VekseidTopic starter

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2007, 01:34:11 PM »
The Ares V being a part of the new Lunar mission in the first place (and capable of lifting half again as much mass to the Moon as the Saturn V)...

The awesome thing about the Ares, IMO, is how obviously they are downplaying its potential power in future designs. They could fit six SRBs around the main.  Yowsa.

Offline Apple of Eris

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2007, 04:23:43 PM »
I was reading a book that touched just lightly on this topic, it was by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, forget the name but it was like a collection of various essays he wrote. In that he mentioned how launching from a LaGrange point for mars rather than earth or the moon made far more sense as you would need a LOT less fuel since you didn't have to overcome planetary (or lunar) gravity to get on your way. He mentioned a moonbase as a potential place to find water (in the dark sections of moon craters where there may be ice) otherwise they really aren't necessary.

Anyway, I think it's pretty cool and I hope it something we actually do achieve in my lifetime. :)

Offline RubySlippers

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2007, 05:24:09 PM »
Ah, gotcha. Thanks for that Veksied I wasnt sure if this was an entirly new project or not.

Anyway, Ruby I see where you are coming from but honestly I think its about that time in mankinds development where we need to start considering exploration of other planets and our solar system. Frankly I think creating a working colony on the moon is a challenge that we really need. However, I agree that with some of these so called international projects we need to cut some spending and pay our fair share rather then the majority of it though. If those projects fail, they fail and we can put that extra money back into the citizen's or military development

Then fine have a United Nations space program, we put in a share along with every other member nation large and small, and have a space program sharing the technological benefits to all and with an eye to making money doing this. I would only support this if all the technology can be issued free to any business and private interest who cares to exploit it for a profit. Example mining and other areas of advancement.

Offline VekseidTopic starter

Re: NASA outlines manned mission to Mars
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2007, 05:38:29 PM »
I was reading a book that touched just lightly on this topic, it was by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, forget the name but it was like a collection of various essays he wrote. In that he mentioned how launching from a LaGrange point for mars rather than earth or the moon made far more sense as you would need a LOT less fuel since you didn't have to overcome planetary (or lunar) gravity to get on your way. He mentioned a moonbase as a potential place to find water (in the dark sections of moon craters where there may be ice) otherwise they really aren't necessary.

Lagrange points are a bit specious over lunar launches - on the moon, you can have a stable manufacturing base that you simply can't have at a Lagrange point that you'd have to spend fuel to get to anyway.  IE a Lagrange point offers no real advantages over building Lunar polar bases.