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Author Topic: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future  (Read 870 times)

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Offline Inkidu

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2016, 08:58:26 AM »
An on paper odd combination of the film both taking too long and being rushed. The D&D film liscence had been floating around for about a decade or so with lots of different scripts attached but TSR and Wizards of the Coast never quite got their act together on selecting one and sticking to it (which also contributed to the vast number of scripts); basically what's known as development hell. Then the hype started to build around the first Lord of the Rings film and Hasbro (which had bought WotC and thus TSR) went "wait, don't we have the D&D license? And isn't that basically the same?" and rushed the film out as a cash grab. And I do mean rushed... they couldn't find a proper director so instead they got the producer (and even then a producer who was only really going to be the money man rather than hands on in any way) to direct, grabbed the first complete script they could find and went for it.
I imagine that somewhere along the way in their quest through the nine hells of movie production they rescued Jeremy Irons from quicksand or a red dragon or something because that's the only way I could see him getting signed on to it. Literally the only redeeming thing in that movie.

Offline Beguile's Mistress

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2016, 09:25:04 AM »
The 13th Warrior is based on the novel Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton.

Offline Inkidu

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2016, 09:40:06 AM »
The 13th Warrior is based on the novel Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton.
Which is itself a retelling of the Beowulf epic. :3

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2016, 09:55:19 AM »
Which is itself a retelling of the Beowulf epic. :3

I did like the way they handled the language barrier in that one, though. 

'How did you learn our language?'
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Online Gadifriald

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2016, 01:03:31 PM »
The 13th Warrior is based on the novel Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton.
Totally AWESOME movie! Totally lousy book!

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2016, 01:13:09 PM »
Totally AWESOME movie! Totally lousy book!

Séo frumspellung sy ánfealdlic.  ;)

(Probably botched that, but Google Translate doesn't have an 'Old English' option.)

Offline Beorning

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2016, 04:24:31 PM »
I imagine that somewhere along the way in their quest through the nine hells of movie production they rescued Jeremy Irons from quicksand or a red dragon or something because that's the only way I could see him getting signed on to it. Literally the only redeeming thing in that movie.

I once read online that, apparently, Irons openly admitted that he did this movie for money...

Offline Sasquatch421

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2016, 08:13:58 PM »
I feel sad that Dungeons and Dragons turned out so awful.  Whoever chose to create a plot for the film instead of using any of the countless Dragonlance or Greyhawk or Forgotten Realms worlds stories was an unmitigated idiot.

I didn't originally mention several movies, as they were hits and not sleepers, like Conan the Barbarian.  I loved that movie.

And Mako made any more 200% more awesome :D

They did do an animated movie of Dragons of Autumn Twilight, never got a chance to watch it myself...

Oh yes and I would like to add Merlin into the mix... First saw it as a mini series, but nabbed the special edition DVD when I first could. It had quite the cast with Sam Neil, Helena Bonham Carter, Rutger Hauer, Miranda Richardson as Queen Mab, Martin Short and James Earl Jones as the Mountain King.

Offline Inkidu

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2016, 08:19:44 PM »
I once read online that, apparently, Irons openly admitted that he did this movie for money...
That's probably the most D&D thing about that movie. When honor, reason, good judgement, morality, duty, and the thrill of the challenge fail to sway the adventurer a DM must resort to mad loots, yo.

Online TheGlyphstone

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2016, 09:43:23 PM »
Specifically, the quote is:

Quote

(When asked by an interviewer about why he accepted his role in "Dungeons & Dragons") "Are you kidding? I'd just bought a castle, I had to pay for it somehow!"

Offline Inkidu

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #35 on: January 25, 2016, 09:51:00 PM »
Specifically, the quote is:
Also said by every D&D player at some point in some adventure somewhere (if you don't, you're not having enough fun with the game).

Offline Haruki

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2016, 10:15:10 PM »
The Dark Crystal is an absolute favorite of mine 'now'.  When I was a kid (I was 9 when my dad rented it for myself and my sister to watch, this being back in 1988), I didn't really care for it.  Maybe because it was just a departure from what I knew of Henson's work prior to it.

I saw it again in 1993, and 'then' it grew on me, but never thought to buy myself a copy until its DVD release.

There were plans of a 'prequel' film, but they sadly fell through.  That would have been a fun watch......or a horrible mis-step.  We'll never know.

Those two animated Tolkien movies (The Hobbit and Return of the King were commissioned out to Topcraft, which eventually folded into Studio Ghibli when most of its former team was hired on by Miyazaki and Isao Takahata.  They did some work on Miyazaki's film Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind.  They worked on that movie The Last Unicorn as well.  A pretty busy studio in those days.

Ralph Bakshi's take of LotR didn't do it either.  It's more of a 'technical' movie.  It took out too much of the story in trying to compress two books down into 1 1/2 hours.

Didn't care for them too much as I was engrossed into the actual books (this was in the early '90s when I saw those movies) at the time.  Loved the live-action adaptions though.  Those would not have been doable in the 1980s or even the early '90s.  So much CG work, but thanks to the advancements of the technology, you can barely tell unless your eyesight is better than 'perfect'.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2016, 10:18:17 PM by Haruki »

Offline The Dark Raven

Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2016, 11:20:15 PM »
I have to...

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Re: Fantasy Films, Their Past and Future
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2016, 12:18:10 AM »
I read the Dragonlance books after my brother bought them in the late 80s/early 90s.  I started playing D&D when I was 10, in 1979.  I was an avowed Greyhawk world player, and when Weis and Hickman wrote all those books I was jealous to an extent that the original D&D world was overlooked.  Once I started reading them, though, it was hard to stop the series.  Raistlin was a good villain.  I think they'd make great fantasy films, and there's a lot of them.

My favorite books I dream of being made into films, though, are The Chronicles of Amber.