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Author Topic: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...  (Read 1323 times)

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Offline KotahTopic starter

Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« on: February 28, 2010, 09:24:01 PM »
It is now state law that subversives thinking to overthrow the government must now register.

http://rawstory.com/2010/02/south-carolinas-subversive-activities-registration-act-force/

I've given thought to registering in case I ever have to drive through the state.

Really now, we need to register? $5 fee to be a subversive? I could get into this. I want paperwork, officially recognizing my status as a known subversive.

Even better, Maybe they'll introduce a subversion equivalent of Megan's Law whereby revolutionaries will be forced to register any changes of address and the neighbors will be warned.

"Hi! I'm your new neighbor! I'm also plotting the overthrow of the government through a socialist revolution. Cookies?"

Doesn't this, in a strange way, create an air of "legality" for "overthrowing the government of the United States"? Like, $5 for the legal permission to overthrow the government. In any event, this is a strange law. Apparently, an earlier version of this law dates back to 1951.

Offline consortium11

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2010, 03:24:45 AM »
I like it for the chuckle factor.

I also like how badly it's worded. The main part makes it an offence to be part of a group:

Quote
...controlling, conducting, seizing or overthrowing the government of the United States, of this State or of any political subdivision thereof by force or violence or other unlawful means;

And yet, in their "groups exempt" clause:

Quote
The terms of this chapter do not apply to any labor union or religious, fraternal or patriotic organization, society or association, or their members, whose objectives and aims do not contemplate the overthrow of the government of the United States, of this State or of any political subdivision thereof by force or violence or other unlawful means.

Now, seeing as they've put in "controlling, conducting, seizing" as well as "overthrowing" in the first clause, they must logically (and legally) believe the terms to have different meanings. Thus any group is exempt, even those who advocate the "controlling, conducting and seizing the government of the United States, of this State or of any political subdivision thereof by force or violence or other unlawful means" can (in my opinion) and can legitimately argue that as long as they don't actually want to overthrow the US government they shouldn't be bound by this. Add in the way it's worded and a judge would be hard pressed to say it wasn't legislative intent to exclude "controlling, conducting, seizing" and thus it's not a hole in the law that judicial activism must fill.

So go on all you subversives out there. As long as you bribe, corrupt, threaten and blackmail the existing government and repeatedly advocate that you don't want to overthrow the government merely to control it you can keep your $5.

Offline DrFier

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2010, 05:00:25 AM »
Doesn't this, in a strange way, create an air of "legality" for "overthrowing the government of the United States"? Like, $5 for the legal permission to overthrow the government. In any event, this is a strange law. Apparently, an earlier version of this law dates back to 1951.

Personally, I've always believed that the Constitution implied that right. If anything, this law would infringe upon it.

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Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2010, 09:11:16 AM »
So go on all you subversives out there. As long as you bribe, corrupt, threaten and blackmail the existing government and repeatedly advocate that you don't want to overthrow the government merely to control it you can keep your $5.

Wouldn't that just make them politicians?  And then the $5 could be a start on campaign financing.

(Just kidding)

Offline RubySlippers

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2010, 04:39:48 PM »
The second amendment is there to allow the people to defend their rights if the government becomes a tyranny, so its our right under the ninth amendment to defend our liberty to do so and is very constitutional to overthrow the government by force. If naturally the government betrays the people and the US Constitution and all other options fail.

I like the statement from V for Vendetta: The people should not be afraid of the government, the government should be afraid of the poeple.


Offline KotahTopic starter

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2010, 11:37:51 PM »
Just imagine if you went in and filled out all that paperwork, just to get turned down for not being subversive enough. o.o

Offline Jude

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2010, 05:44:53 AM »
It's kind of sad that South Carolina is actually afraid enough of subversives to even consider this legislation.  The idea of a violent revolution led by anything but the military in the United States is absolutely ridiculous.  It's not like you can go to the corner store, purchase a handgun, then blow up a tank with your militiaman training.

Lets face it, the second amendment is an absolute joke when it comes to considering the citizen's ability to overthrow the government unless we start selling RPGs and C4 to "patriots" and offer training in guerrilla warfare at the high school level.  Just another antiquated provision that made sense in the context of the American Revolutionary War, but no longer does today.

Offline Merlyn

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2010, 06:05:23 PM »
Well first off I have to say that I think part of it is to try and trap people into getting themselves arrested.

Quote
While the law is clearly redundant -- there are plenty of statutes at the state and federal level through which terrorists can be prosecuted

And now they can find them.  Especially if an enemy spy or sleeper cell was stupid enough to walk into a city hall and fill out a 'I'm a terrorist' paper. ;D

Plus personally I believe this would almost be directed more at the anti-government militias that do exist in the US, and to try and keep something like the German American Bund (from back in the thirty's) from starting up again.  Especially if they have to register if they are controlled by a foreign country. 

Now even though it isn't really part of this topic I have to through in that it's really not that unbelievable that their could be a non-military coup in this country.  Believe it or not in most states you can purchase many very powerful "military grade" weapons.  If you don't believe me go to a gun show.  Last time I was at one I could have bought any of a number of .30 or .50 cal machine guns, as well as having a .50 cal m82 for sale.  And note, that at least in my state you do not have to register a weapon purchased at a gun show either. 
And as for fighting tanks, it doesn't really take that much to disable a tracked vehicle, not to mention that explosives are not hard to make, or thermite for that matter.  Plus that's assuming that their would be an all out bloody war, and not simply a ground storming the major political buildings or a few well placed operatives.

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2010, 06:48:32 PM »
Hmm.. I wonder if this law can be twisted to apply to lobbyists and special interests.

Offline KotahTopic starter

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2010, 04:02:13 AM »
A 22 might not be an AK47.

However, 200 22's might just beat out an AK47.

Never underestimate the power of large groups.

Offline TheLegionary

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Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2010, 08:12:42 AM »
Maybe South Caroline legislators should exchange some experience with the Iraqi and Afhgan Parliaments.

Offline Merlyn

Re: Oh... South Carolina... South Carolina...
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2010, 09:01:14 PM »
A 22 might not be an AK47.

However, 200 22's might just beat out an AK47.

Never underestimate the power of large groups.

Actually you can buy an AK47 for a few hundred bucks depending on where it was made.  Romanian and Ukrainian are rather plentiful (last year anyway)
Hmm.. I wonder if this law can be twisted to apply to lobbyists and special interests.


I was actually wondering if it would end up being twisted to get used on religious groups.  I'd be pretty funny to say that since the churches are almost all run by other countries, or groups in other countries, that they must to register... just in case they decided to take over.