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Author Topic: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves  (Read 553 times)

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Offline ElayneTopic starter

Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« on: June 30, 2009, 11:44:51 AM »
 29/06/2009 4:49:00 AM
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO - Toyota Motor Corp. says it has developed a way of steering a wheelchair by just detecting brain waves, without the person having to move a muscle or shout a command.

Toyota's system, developed in a collaboration with researchers in Japan, is among the fastest in the world in analyzing brain waves, it said in a release Monday. Past systems required several seconds to read brain waves, but the new technology requires only 125 milliseconds - or 125 thousandths of a second.

The person in the wheelchair wears a cap that can read brain signals, which are relayed to a brain scan electroencephalograph, or EEG, on the electrically powered wheelchair, and then analyzed in a computer program.

The new system allows the person on the wheelchair to turn left or right and go forward, almost instantly, according to researchers.

Coming to a stop still requires more than a thought. The person in the wheelchair must puff up a cheek, which is picked up in a detector worn on the face.

Japanese rival Honda Motor Co. is also working on a system to connect the monitoring of brain waves with mechanical moves.

Earlier this year, Honda showed a video that had a person wearing a helmet sitting still but thinking about moving his right hand. The thought was picked up by cords attached to his head inside the helmet. After several seconds, Honda's boy-shaped robot Asimo, programmed to respond to brain signals, lifted its right arm.

Neither Honda nor Toyota said it had any plans to turn the technology into a product for commercial sale as each said they are still developing the research.

http://technology.sympatico.msn.ca/News/ContentPosting?newsitemid=269615938&feedname=CP-CONSUMER-TECH&show=False&number=0&showbyline=True&subtitle=&detect=&abc=abc&date=True

Offline Paradox

Re: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2009, 12:21:52 PM »
That's great for those morbidly obese people who have to use the power-chairs provided in the grocery stores. Now they can exert even less energy than before!

Seriously though, that's incredible. Thanks for passing it on, Elayne. I'm excited to see where this sort of technology will be taken next.

Offline Tachi

Re: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2009, 01:06:05 PM »
Very cool, but who gets them should be monitored if they're ever released to the public. I also wonder what would happen if the person started daydreaming or simply having other thoughts.

Offline Avi

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Re: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2009, 02:03:12 PM »
Mind-controlled vehicles for the disabled have been in the works for a while.  It's good to see that a major company is finally getting behind the idea.

Offline Revolverman

Re: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2009, 05:28:35 AM »
Is there a way to key it to someone's brainwaves? because this could end badly if someone could take control of the chair.

Offline Rhapsody

Re: Toyota Develops Wheelchair piloted by brainwaves
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2009, 07:32:09 AM »
Besides the fact that you have to wear a sensor cap connected to the chair?