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Author Topic: Books you could not put down.  (Read 891 times)

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Offline VaultTopic starter

Books you could not put down.
« on: February 28, 2009, 04:33:40 PM »
Hello,


I'm looking for some good reading. The weather is calling for 6 inches of snow in the next day or two so I don't expect to be leaving the house much considering how the whole city will likely shut down. I'm hoping you guys and gals can help me find something to sink my teeth into.

Here are the books I could not put down.

The Twilight series - Stephenie Meyer
The Fever series - Karen Marie Moning (unfinished series)
The Harry Potter series - J.K.Rowling
The Sword of Truth series - Terry Goodkind
The Belgariad series - David and Lee Eddings

As you can tell I'm really into fantasy.

Offline Aysleen

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2009, 04:37:00 PM »
Any of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter books by Laurell K Hamilton
You should also check out her Merry Gentry series too

Offline jouzinka

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2009, 04:40:35 PM »
:)

Dan Brown - Angels & Demons - I found it better than The DaVinci Code
Anne Rice - Interview with the Vampire - old, I know, but phew...
Micheal Crichton - Eaters of the Dead - it's old travelbook and first about fifty pages aren't that interesting (unless you are really into local customs of Bulgars, Turks etc... some of them are pretty startling), but just after that the wheel starts spinning. ;D

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2009, 04:45:16 PM »
No such book exists for me.

Offline HairyHeretic

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2009, 04:52:40 PM »
Magician, by Raymond E Feist.

Little slow for the first 100 pages, but after that I couldn't stop. Sat and read the whole thing in one sitting (800 pages or so).

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2009, 05:07:05 PM »
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton (which I read in two days after seeing the movie---book is so much better!)

and The Harry Potter series (especially the last two)

Offline Ket

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2009, 05:15:17 PM »
Dan Brown - Angels & Demons - I found it better than The DaVinci Code

Yes, it was MUCH better!!

Not fantasy, but still good books...

Anything by Steve Berry (re-written historical fiction like Dan Brown, but not so many liberties taken.  A bit more believable)
Anything by Greg Iles (he will draw you in quickly and not let you go for an instant)

Offline Lady Annabelle

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2009, 05:19:55 PM »
Anne Rice - Interview with the Vampire - old, I know, but phew...
Micheal Crichton - Eaters of the Dead - it's old travelbook and first about fifty pages aren't that interesting (unless you are really into local customs of Bulgars, Turks etc... some of them are pretty startling), but just after that the wheel starts spinning. ;D

*Laughs*  I am currently reading 'Interview With The Vampire' at this moment.  I have already read 'The Vampire Lestat', so I figured that I had to read the prequel.  The first 100 pages were pretty dull, but it has been pretty beautiful since then.  I like it better than 'Lestat'.

I couldn't stand 'Eaters Of The Dead'.  I REALLY enjoyed 'The Great Train Robbery', so I tried another of Crichton's books and I read 'Eaters'.  The history and the culture just sucked the life out of it for me, but no big deal.  Glad to see somebody like it.

Magician, by Raymond E Feist.

Little slow for the first 100 pages, but after that I couldn't stop. Sat and read the whole thing in one sitting (800 pages or so).

I read 'Magician: The Apprentice' by Raymond E. Feist and I thought that was pretty good.  It's been a while, so I don't remember exactly everything about it, but I was pretty impressed with it.

For me, I liked:

- 'Sword/Elfstones Of Shannara' by Terry Brooks.  Think LOTR, but better.  More action, more intense, better characters and a greater flow.  Both of them kept me on the edge of my seat at every page.

- 'Children Of The Dragon' by Frank Robinson.  It is really graphic and has some intense scenes, but it is a beautiful story of betrayal, revenge, slavery and destiny.

- 'The Story Of 'O' by Pauline Reage.  I liked it until the end.  I thought the ending was a bit much.  But, it is a classic that I have read for years and will continue to read for years.

- 'Little Women' by Louisa May Alcott, 'Pride and Prejudice' by Jane Austen, & 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte.  These are all classic novels from my youth that I will always hold dear to me.  I have read them so many times and will love them for the rest of my life.

- 'High Fidelity' by Nick Hornby.  Much different from the movie, but a perfect view into modern relationships.

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2009, 05:24:54 PM »
Anything by Charles DeLint. Personal favorites are Yarrow, Moonheart, and Greenmantle.

Offline Lilias

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2009, 05:28:53 PM »
Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series.
Some of Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels (especially anything involving the Witches of Lancre).
Yasmine Galenorn's Witchling, Changeling and Darkling aren't half bad either.

Offline jouzinka

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2009, 05:33:12 PM »
*Laughs*  I am currently reading 'Interview With The Vampire' at this moment.  I have already read 'The Vampire Lestat', so I figured that I had to read the prequel.  The first 100 pages were pretty dull, but it has been pretty beautiful since then.  I like it better than 'Lestat'.

I couldn't stand 'Eaters Of The Dead'.  I REALLY enjoyed 'The Great Train Robbery', so I tried another of Crichton's books and I read 'Eaters'.  The history and the culture just sucked the life out of it for me, but no big deal.  Glad to see somebody like it.

I remember that when I finished the Interview, I planned on reading other books by Ann Rice, but somehow it got lost in the history... I might pick up on that. ;D

Eaters aren't for everybody. As I said - the first fifty pages are all the same and the culture at times so... not understandable, that it makes the book really difficult to read. I particularly liked "A Case of Need" by Crichton - it's a detective story from medical environment...

I realize, that I previously forgot to include The Horse Whisperer by Nicolas Evans. It's not that kind of book you wouldn't be able to put off (there are passages you need to breath through), but it sure is worth the read. And if you saw the movie... well, the book is a lot different. Not sweet at all.

Offline Maeven

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2009, 05:36:03 PM »
Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card  (Love, love, love this book.)

The Dexter Series, Jeff Lindsey


I really liked the Anne Rice Interview series too, especially the last one, Memnoch the Devil.

Offline consortium11

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2009, 05:38:35 PM »
Any David Gemmell book: I'm a huge fanboy of his and while several of the books seemed to be him just ticking his standard "heroic fantasy" checklist, I still couldn't put them down.

A Theory of Justice: John Rawls : Probably the most important political philosophy book of the last 50 years

Anarchy, State and Utopia: Robert Nozick's response to the above and an equally brilliant disection of political theory.

The Man Who Fed The World : Dr. Leon Hesser : Biography of Norman Borlaug... the person no-one's heard of who depending on who you ask has saved between millions and a billion lives.

Offline Jack

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2009, 06:11:11 PM »
Noughts and Crosses series by Malorie Blackman (It's placed under teenage reading, but it's a fantastic series)
The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks. My favourite book in the whole world.

Offline Yggdrasil

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Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2009, 07:05:44 PM »
The Lies of Locke Lamora- Scott Lynch. (I've recommended this book to others before, and I'll not stop yet ^_^)

Company of Liars- Karen Maitland (A good read if you like to have stories make you go "NO WAY!" at the end  ;D This one plays mind games, not only with you but with the characters. Damn good!)

The Name of the Wind- Patrick Rothfuss (A good fantasy base story. The first book is just over 700 pages, and the second is due in April. Seriously a good read!)

I, Vampire- Michael Romkey (A bit of a refreshing vampire story, I think. Writen in the 90's, it's probably not going to be on the shelves, odds are you'll have to order it. It's the life of a man who had no purpose and fell in love with a vampire and becoming one himself. This story plays with historical figures like Mosart, Rasputin, Jack the Ripper, and Tatiana, Anistasia's sister. Refreshing from all the cliche, teen-bopper vamp stories now surfacing... or at least thats my opinion. ;) )

Offline MHaji

Re: Books you could not put down.
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2009, 07:28:41 PM »
The Crying of Lot 49, by Thomas Pynchon. Ignore the counterculture cultishness, ignore the pretentious criticism ("Is it a postmodern masterpiece or a deconstruction of postmodern deconstructionism itself?"), and just focus on the fact that it is a hilarious, dark, mind-breaking book about an ancient conspiracy of postal workers. Also, it's much shorter than his other books, so if you can't put it down, at least you won't starve while reading it.

And speaking of postal conspiracies:

Going Postal, by Terry Pratchett. In hindsight, I can see all sorts of things that were disjointed or awkward or too pat, but I sure didn't care about that when I was reading it. It's hilarious, exciting, and persistently clever, a dead-on morality play. Plus, it takes potshots at Atlas Shrugged, which always scores points with me.

And speaking of morality plays:

Gaudy Night, by Dorothy Sayers: A feminist romance! A celebration and satire of Oxford culture! A murder mystery where the victim is a manuscript! A comedy of manners! Gaudy Night is four books in one, and all four are great fun.