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Author Topic: Word of the Day Challenge  (Read 33246 times)

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Online Daeva

Re: Word of the Day Challenge
« Reply #825 on: December 10, 2019, 08:08:43 AM »
Today's Word of the Day is....


reiterate
verb ree-IT-uh-rayt

Definition

: to state or do over again or repeatedly sometimes with wearying effect


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Folk Tales


Did You Know?

Can you guess the meaning of iterate, a less common relative of reiterate? It must mean simply "to state or do," right? Nope. Actually, iterate also means "to state or do again." It's no surprise, then, that some usage commentators have insisted that reiterate must always mean "to say or do again AND AGAIN." No such nice distinction exists in actual usage, however. Both reiterate and iterate can convey the idea of a single repetition or of many repetitions. Reiterate is the older of the two words—it first appeared in the 15th century, whereas iterate turned up in the 16th century. Both stem from the Latin verb iterare, which is itself from iterum ("again"), but reiterate took an extra step, through Latin reiterare ("to repeat").


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Re: Word of the Day Challenge
« Reply #826 on: December 10, 2019, 05:27:27 PM »
Linnea stood at the window, watching the supply carts unloading down in the courtyard under the sharp eye of her younger son. Felan was only sixteen, but his organisational skills rivalled those of the castle steward, and he had insisted on supervising the preparations for his brother’s wedding banquet himself, leaving only the details of the ceremony to the groom to sort out, and as the officiant was going to be Lady Aldaran herself, the sorting out had been rather brief and stress-free.

Linnea sighed to herself. All the children had turned out really well. Both boys had served in the Cadets; Damon had been discharged last fall and come home to learn the details of being Lord Aldaran, while Felan had one more year to go. The older girl, Maellen, was destined for the Tower; at fourteen, she had already displayed such talent and skill, as well as aptitude for the cloistered life of a matrix technician, that they were unlikely to want to ever part with her. The younger, Doria, was fostered in the house of Damon’s bride, in the Serrais plains, and might find a husband of her own there, when the time came. All of them had found themselves away from home, where they had been fawned on by everyone, and had to develop their potential and prove themselves. Damon and his lady would not need much guidance at all. Linnea could lay down her burden and settle into dowagerhood. Enjoy her twilight years. Rest.

Tomorrow, there would be a big celebration and feast, complete with all those exotic comestibles from the southern plains, that had finally found their way into the pantry. Tonight, however, Linnea wished that Conleth were still around to join in the festivities, and that their children had the chance to be children for just a little bit longer.

Online Daeva

Re: Word of the Day Challenge
« Reply #827 on: Yesterday at 08:27:33 AM »
Today's Word of the Day is....


sodden
adjective SAH-dun

Definition

1 a : dull or expressionless especially from continued indulgence in alcoholic beverages
b : torpid, sluggish
2 a : heavy with or as if with moisture or water
b : heavy or doughy because of imperfect cooking


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Nowadays, seethed is the past tense and past participle form of the verb seethe (which originally meant "to boil or stew"). Originally, however, seethe could also be conjugated in the past tense as sod and in the past participle as sodden. By the 14th century, sodden had become an independent adjective synonymous with boiled. And, by the 16th century, it had taken on the figurative sense used to describe someone who appears dull, expressionless, or stupid, particularly as a result of heavy drinking. Today, sodden is commonly used as a synonym of soaked or saturated. Seethe followed a different figurative path: while one who is sodden may appear dull, torpid, or sluggish, one who is seething is highly agitated, like a pot of boiling water.


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Re: Word of the Day Challenge
« Reply #828 on: Yesterday at 06:33:44 PM »
The day Theresa walked through the shelter doors and signed up for voluntary work with us, we had no idea how much she would change the place.

It was January, the bleakest time of the year in the best of times. We hadn’t had much luck with adoptions before the holidays; mutts and moggies don’t make glamorous enough gifts. It was bitterly cold, and we’d had to rescue more strays than usual, only to have most of them die anyway. One of our long-time volunteers had quit because her arthritis was getting too painful to work; another had been diagnosed with cancer. When you’re desperately understaffed, not to mention underfunded, and a celebrity swans in and offers to muck in, you say yes and hope they have a decent pair of hands.

Granted, Theresa was no A-lister at the time, just a glamorous assistant type in a game show, but she was young and pretty enough for the media to be interested in whatever she was doing. On that first day she had come virtually incognito, hiding behind a knit snood that covered all but a few wisps of her distinctive red hair, and big sunglasses, although the sun hadn’t as much as peeked out from behind the clouds, and signed up under her real name, not the variant she used for work. She would come in on any day she didn’t have to be at the studio, and her hands never stopped. Feeding, brushing, washing, petting, everything. The older animals adored her, and gradually, as the weather started to improve and we recruited another volunteer, she would spend more and more time simply socialising with them. ‘If they’re unlikely to be adopted, then they might as well be treated as family in here,’ she used to say.

Of course, the media found out, and started to turn up as well. After the first awkward couple of occasions when some journalist didn’t find her in and tried to get our staff to gossip to him about her, Theresa took the situation into her own hands. She would speak to anyone who wanted an interview, but always while showing them around and introducing cats and dogs to them by name, like family members. ‘It’s not simply charity,’ she said often. ‘It’s taking care of companions who have trusted us to do so.’

It worked. Donations started to trickle in, both food and money. More people came to volunteer, several saying that they had no idea we were in the neighbourhood until they read one of Theresa’s interviews. Others came looking to adopt specific animals they had seen with her. When she went on The One Show and mentioned a fundraiser to expand the kennel area, we ended up raising the necessary sum in less than a month.

Her career has taken off in a new direction now, and she no longer comes in so regularly, but we still get people coming in who found out about us through her, and the kennel expansion, Theresa’s Park, will be telling the tale for a long time to come.

Online Daeva

Re: Word of the Day Challenge
« Reply #829 on: Today at 08:20:36 AM »
Today's Word of the Day is....


belle epoque
noun BEL-ay-POK

Definition

often capitalized Belle Epoque : a period of high artistic or cultural development; especially : such a period in fin de siècle France


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Did You Know?

In the years before World War I, France experienced a period of economic growth that produced a wealth of artistic and cultural developments. That era has been described as excessive, glittering, gaudy, and extravagant, but the tumultuous days of war that followed it inspired the French to call that productive period la belle époque—literally, "the beautiful age." The term belle epoque soon found its way into English, where it came to be used to refer not only to the glory days of late 19th-century France, but to any similarly luxurious period. It is now used to more elegantly convey the sentiments of another nostalgic expression, "the good old days."