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Author Topic: Forgotten Words  (Read 1587 times)

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Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #75 on: December 22, 2018, 06:06:12 PM »
Alexithymia

noun
  • inability to identify and express or describe one’s feelings
  • a personality construct characterized by the subclinical inability to identify and describe emotions in the self.
  • marked dysfunction in emotional awareness, social attachment, and interpersonal relating.
  • difficulty in experiencing, expressing, and describing emotional responses.

Medical English, mid-20th Century
from Greek: ἀ- (a-, 'not') + λέξις (léxis, 'words') + θῡμός (thȳmós, 'heart' or 'emotions'), literally meaning "no words for emotions."

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #76 on: December 27, 2018, 07:37:50 AM »
Hope everyone is having a marvelous holiday season!!



Hoggelly bog

noun
  • a stocking with the foot cut off, used as a gaiter
  • cloth footwear with a skin sole
  • socks soled with deerskin or sealskin and worn in winter, not inside but outside the moccasins
  • 'Saboos,' 'oglibogs,' 'clunks,' 'God walkers'

Newfoundland English ("Newfie")
No established etymology.



Offline Argyros Drakontos

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #77 on: December 27, 2018, 06:15:29 PM »
Obambulate

ob·​am·​bu·​late

\äˈbambyəˌlāt, əˈ-\



"Haters Gonna Hate."

verb

1. (Intransitive) To walk about, to wander aimlessly.
2. (Transitive) To walk or go up to, so as or as if to meet.

Etymology

Obambulate. From the Latin obambulatus – a past participle of the verb obambulare, which roughly translates as "to walk to" (prefix, ob– (to, against, over) + verb ambulare (to walk)).

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #78 on: December 28, 2018, 09:58:07 AM »
circumjacent   


Adjective
  • Surrounding.
  • Example: 'the circumjacent parts of the mouth'

Origin

Late 15th century: from Latin circumjacent- 'lying round about, bordering upon', from the verb circumjacere, from circum 'around' + jacere 'to lie'.

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #79 on: December 28, 2018, 10:08:26 AM »
Thank you both for the contributions! They're perfect!!

Online Sain

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #80 on: December 28, 2018, 10:10:46 AM »
I really love 'obambulate' it has the funny word taste all over!

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #81 on: December 28, 2018, 09:21:14 PM »
whipjack

noun
  • a beggar impersonating a distressed sailor
  • a pirate disguised as a shipwrecked sailor
  • a poor whining seaman who never was at sea
  • a freshwater mariner

from Middle English whippen or wippen (shaken or whipped)
from Old Dut. wippen (to shake)
from Old High German wipph (swinging motion) [Ger. weifen (to move)]


Offline Argyros Drakontos

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #82 on: December 29, 2018, 01:36:39 AM »
Mumpsimus

[muhmp-suh-muh's]



"I'm such a genious [sic]."

noun (singular)

1. Adherence to, or persistence in, an erroneous use of language, memorization, practice or belief out of habit or obstinacy.
2. A person who persists in a mistaken expression or practice.
3. A person who obstinately adheres to old customs or ideas in spite of evidence that they are wrong or unreasonable.

Etymology

Mumpsimus (c. 1520–1530). From Middle English, an archaic term for "an incorrigible, dogmatic old pedant". According to Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus, the word was originally a
misspelling of sūmpsimus (Latin, sūmere ("to take", "to pick up") from the phrase sumpsimus in quod in ore sumpsimus ("[this Eucharist] which we have taken into the mouth")) by an
illiterate clergymen while reciting the liturgy for mass. The priest refused to change his opinion when corrected, replying, "I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus".
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 01:52:18 AM by Argyros Drakontos »

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #83 on: December 31, 2018, 09:28:29 PM »
Plebicolar


adjective
  • Courting or appealing to the common people
  • Favored by commoners
  • Pandering to the masses

English, 1626 - 1820
from Latin plebeius (from plebs, pleb- ‘the common people’)
plus Latin color (appearance).

Offline Argyros Drakontos

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #84 on: January 01, 2019, 12:41:27 AM »
Plebicolar


adjective
  • Courting or appealing to the common people
  • Favored by commoners
  • Pandering to the masses

English, 1626 - 1820
from Latin plebeius (from plebs, pleb- ‘the common people’)
plus Latin color (appearance).


Sounds like my D&D 5e Bard. He has a noble background (i.e. position of privilege); thus, he appeals to the masses and is loved by the people. I am so using this word in our campaign  :-)

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #85 on: January 03, 2019, 01:42:21 PM »
Sounds like my D&D 5e Bard. He has a noble background (i.e. position of privilege); thus, he appeals to the masses and is loved by the people. I am so using this word in our campaign  :-)

Ooooo, I love Bards! Every edition (except 4th) I've played a bard. Including 1st Ed, and let me tell you, that was freaking hard!! 

And in talking about bard, let's go for something musical today! Not a forgotten one, but definitely not a common one, either!




Melopoeia


noun
  • a melody, a composition of music
  • the art or theory of inventing melody
  • a classification of poetry put forth by the poet Ezra Poun, where words are "charged" beyond their normal meaning with some musical property which further directs its meaning, inducing emotional correlations by sound and rhythm of the speech.
  • the musical and rhythmic qualities of poetic language, especially as suited to the tone or mood of the text.

English, early 18th Century
Late Latin, from Greek melopoiïa
from melopoiein (to write a lyric poem, to set to music)
from melo- (song) + poiein (to make)


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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #86 on: January 03, 2019, 03:53:40 PM »
excogitate


Transitive verb
  • Think out, plan, or devise.
  • In a sentence: She is a master at excogitating reasons not to do her assigned work.

Synonyms:

concoct, construct, contrive, cook (up), devise, drum up, fabricate, invent, make up, manufacture, think (up), trump up, vamp (up)

Early 16th century: from Latin excogitat- 'found by process of thought', from the verb excogitare, from ex- 'out' + cogitare 'think'.

Pronunciation:

excogitate/ɛksˈkɒdʒɪteɪt//ɪksˈkɒdʒɪteɪt/

Offline Argyros Drakontos

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #87 on: January 03, 2019, 11:17:19 PM »
Palfrey

[pal·​frey | ˈpȯl-frē]



"I want to ride the pretty palfrey."

noun (archaic)

1. A saddle horse not bred or trained for war.
2. A docile horse used for ordinary riding, especially by women.

Etymology

Palfrey (c. 13th Century, Middle English). From the Anglo-French word palefrei, which is derived from medieval Latin palafredus and Late Latin paraveredus, a portmanteau of Greek prefix para- ("beside", "subsidiary") and Latin veredus ("light horse").

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #88 on: January 05, 2019, 10:00:32 AM »
I'll present to you one of my favourite words! Well, I like the adjective version more then the noun, just because it's an ugly word for something beautiful and it's pretty fun to say!




Pulchritude
[pul·​chri·​tude | \ˈpəl-krə-ˌtüd, -ˌtyüd\]

Noun
  • used of persons only having great physical beauty, comeliness.
  • (literary) Having great physical beauty.

pulchritudinous, adj. | Attractive, beautiful
pulchrify, verb | Synonym of "beautify"
pulchritudeness, noun | same meaning as pulchritude
pulchrous, adj. | Fair, beautiful

Middle English (circa 15th century)
from Latin pulchritudin-, pulchritudo, from pulchr-, pulcher beautiful

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #89 on: January 05, 2019, 10:32:26 AM »
Excellent well!  Thank for all the new contributions!

Online stormwyrm

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #90 on: January 06, 2019, 12:31:19 AM »
Entelechy

Noun
  • The complete realisation and final form of some potential concept or function; the conditions under which a potential thing becomes actualized.
  • A particular type of motivation, need for self-determination, and inner strength directing life and growth to become all one is capable of being; the need to actualize one's beliefs; having both a personal vision and the ability to actualize that vision from within

Middle English 1593, From Late Latin entelechia, from Ancient Greek ἐντελέχεια (entelékheia), coined by Aristotle from ἐντελής (entelḗs, “complete, finished, perfect”) (from τέλος (télos, “end, fruition, accomplishment”)) + ἔχω (ékhō, “to have”).

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #91 on: January 06, 2019, 09:23:22 PM »
Entelechy

Noun
  • The complete realisation and final form of some potential concept or function; the conditions under which a potential thing becomes actualized.
  • A particular type of motivation, need for self-determination, and inner strength directing life and growth to become all one is capable of being; the need to actualize one's beliefs; having both a personal vision and the ability to actualize that vision from within

Middle English 1593, From Late Latin entelechia, from Ancient Greek ἐντελέχεια (entelékheia), coined by Aristotle from ἐντελής (entelḗs, “complete, finished, perfect”) (from τέλος (télos, “end, fruition, accomplishment”)) + ἔχω (ékhō, “to have”).

Now THAT is a word! 

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #92 on: January 08, 2019, 02:52:02 PM »
Giggle Water


noun
  • alcohol
  • champagne

American English, slang, 1920s

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #93 on: January 08, 2019, 02:54:11 PM »
Definitely true for me. xD

Online Sain

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #94 on: January 08, 2019, 02:54:57 PM »
That has to be one of my favourite words for alcohol up there with 'somersault potion'.

Offline Argyros Drakontos

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #95 on: January 10, 2019, 01:19:38 PM »
Sennight


"I've been playing Fortnite for a sennight."

[sen·​night | ˈse-ˌnīt ]

noun (archaic)

1. A period of seven days and nights.
2. One week.

Variant(s): Se'nnight


Etymology

Sennight (c. 15th Century, Middle English). From Old English seofon nihta ("seven nights").

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #96 on: January 10, 2019, 02:42:17 PM »
Sennight


"I've been playing Fortnite for a sennight."

[sen·​night | ˈse-ˌnīt ]

noun (archaic)

1. A period of seven days and nights.
2. One week.

Variant(s): Se'nnight


Etymology

Sennight (c. 15th Century, Middle English). From Old English seofon nihta ("seven nights").

That's definitely one I've never heard before! Thanks, Argyos!

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #97 on: January 10, 2019, 02:56:01 PM »
Eye-Wash


noun
  • Official deceit or pretentiousness
  • An appearance of virtue designed to conceal a disgraceful reality
  • Artificial tidiness, especially in regards to an inspection.
  • A threat of punishment that could never actually be carried out
  • Something that is intended to obscure or conceal actual facts or motives

British military slang, 1914-1918
Taken from the notion that certain lotions used by oculists would cause temporary blindness or blurred vision when first applied. An example would be officers coloring in hand-drawn maps in the hopes of concealing inaccuracies.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2019, 03:08:12 PM by Justric »

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Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #98 on: January 11, 2019, 08:20:57 PM »
Therianthrope

noun
  • A mythical being that is part-human, part-animal

From Ancient Greek θηρίον (thēríon, “wild beast”) and ἄνθρωπος (ánthrōpos, “man”).

It's the general term for any human/animal hybrid creature, and would include werewolves, catgirls, centaurs, fauns, satyrs, minotaurs, the various animal-headed gods of ancient Egypt, sphinxes, etc.

Online JustricTopic starter

Re: Forgotten Words
« Reply #99 on: January 14, 2019, 03:09:03 PM »
Jannock


adjective
  • straightforward and fair
  • upright; decent
  • outspoken; honest; outgoing
noun
  • Northern British dialect for bannock
  • a small loaf of oatmeal or oatmeal bread
  • a usually unleavened flat bread or biscuit made with oatmeal or barley meal
  • corn bread (New England), especially a thin cake baked on a griddle

Northern England from Middle English ianock
(etymology unknown)
« Last Edit: January 14, 2019, 03:49:52 PM by Justric »