You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
April 19, 2019, 11:24:14 AM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Platinum Send us your theme!

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: Fun Academic Articles and Findings  (Read 3534 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #75 on: April 04, 2019, 05:53:23 AM »
This is not exactly a finding, but more of a hype. Next week on April 10th the first ever pictures captured of a black hole will be released! Exciting stuff. My horror and scifi muse is already tingling.

Offline Lilias

  • La Que Sabe ~ Shamaniac ~ Melinoë ~ The Unforgiving
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Aug 2008
  • Location: Spying for the Rebel Alliance
  • Gender: Female
  • Aren't you a little short for a Stormtrooper?
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 2
Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #76 on: April 05, 2019, 02:22:32 AM »
A fascinating TED talk about public space and civic life. Focused on America, but the insights are for everyone.

https://www.ted.com/talks/james_howard_kunstler_dissects_suburbia

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #77 on: April 09, 2019, 10:25:21 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #78 on: April 10, 2019, 09:15:54 AM »
A new research study shows that exposure to nonthermal plasmas can effectively destroy 99.9% of airborne viruses. This process could be used as an alternative to the antiquated surgical mask, which would be particularly useful in the agriculture industry where the risk of zoonotic disease is present. [Article]




Figure 1. Herek Clack, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor at the University of Michigan and his team set up a lab study at Barton Farms in Homer, Michigan. The scaled, non-thermal plasma device has previously been proven to achieve high inactivation rates (>99%) of MS2 phage viral surrogates, a virus that infects Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. © Robert Coelius, Michigan Engineering.



That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2019, 06:43:51 PM »
That's kinda cool. I wonder if they could tweak it to kill bacteria as well and develop new type of general purpose air sterilizers? Could be an efficient alternative to the current membrane based filter systems.

Also here's that promised image of black hole. Gaze into its abyss. Here's an article about it, though I think in this case it's more interesting to just stare.


Very cool, Sain! Thank you for sharing.

And for those who are curious as to why the image is so
blurry
, it's actually one of the highest resolution images ever taken. The EHT (Event Horizon Telescope) collected approximately 1000 disks and 5 petabytes of data, which is equivalent to "all of the selfies that 40,000 people will take in their lifetime." Plus, the black hole is 55 million light years away. [Article]


Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #80 on: April 14, 2019, 05:13:47 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #81 on: April 14, 2019, 05:31:50 PM »
Scientists have developed a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, called CRISPR-Cas3, which can efficiently erase long stretches of DNA from a targeted site in the human genome, with the potential to seek out and erase such ectopic viruses as Herpes Simplex, Epstein-Barr, and Hepatitis B. [Article]

Ooooh, need to read this one later. It's really cool to see the new CRISPR version coming up and the toolkit expanding.

Offline Argyros

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #82 on: April 17, 2019, 06:22:27 PM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]


Online SainTopic starter

Re: Fun Academic Articles and Findings
« Reply #83 on: Yesterday at 05:03:37 AM »
In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have "printed" the world's first
3D vascularised engineered heart
using a patient's own cells and biological materials. [Article] [Publication]

Thank you for sharing Argyros! Seems to be still ten years away from usable according to the scientists, but nonetheless impressive. Remember chatting with someone who was trying to make kidneys and getting the cells into proper organ shape and having them stay in it is for sure one of the biggest challenges for any organ 3D printing. Now getting them to work properly after it is another hurdle, but I would assume maybe that's something they can do with hormone or chemical treaments now that the cells are where they should be. Definitely interesting to follow the process of this field. And relaxing since you only have to check news every year or so to keep up with them ;D