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Author Topic: Let's Make Up A Religion! [M lf F, Light]  (Read 626 times)

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Offline TheVillainTopic starter

Let's Make Up A Religion! [M lf F, Light]
« on: April 19, 2017, 05:01:52 PM »
So I had an idea for a setting and was hoping to RP it with a female partner.

The basic premise is that this is an alternate timeline where Ba'al/Asherah worship was able to adapt to the up-and-coming Abrahamic Religions instead of dying out. As a result in the modern age there's another major religion competing on the world stage collectively known as "Caananite Paganism".

Modern Caananite Paganism usually centers around the worship of two dieties, named Ba'al and Asherah. Both are described as among other things fertility dieties, male and female respectively and between them representing both both sides of nearly every cosmic duality. Some denominations going as far as to claim that at least some dieties of other religions also exist, but they're all explicitly said to be the children of Ba'al and Asherah if they do.

Two key differences between the other major religions and Caananite Paganism is the organizational structure and the attitude toward sex. The idea that the sexes at least balance each other has always been a key feature of the theology and in modern times this has translated into a requirement that there always be two "Popes", one Male and one Female. These two figures are said to represent Ba'al and Asherah on Earth respectively and as such part of the requirements to be in these positions is to be fit and young enough to be fertile, among other requirements. The sexual act is then considered an act that brings the participant a little closer to the Divine (within reason).

In ancient times to make sure Ba'al and Asherah are fit, young, and fertile forever these "Popes" were often killed and replaced in a twice yearly ceremony. Basically they checked the Asherah to see if she was pregnant, if the Asherah wasn't pregnant on a Vernal Equinox she was killed and replaced by a new Asherah. If the Asherah wasn't pregnant on an Autumnal Equinox they killed and replaced the Ba'al. In modern times the Asherah and Ba'al aren't literially murdered if the Asherah isn't pregnant on their appointed days, but there is a symbolic sacrifice to their replacement.

[As for possible characters, we can discuss that but I'm thinking why go halfway? Or characters are the current Ba'al and Asherah, the representatives of the God and Goddess on Earth in modern times.

Feel free to Post or PM any thoughts or interest.]

Offline VonHellsing

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Re: Let's Make Up A Religion! [M lf F, Light]
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2017, 06:28:35 PM »
I love this. I love this way more than I reasonably should.

Allow me to nerd out and make up some things here.

This can lead to many interesting historical and demographic possibilities. I'd imagine that the origins for this cult would be in either Carthage and Punic lands post-Punic Wars or in the traditional Levant (Israel, Syria, Lebanon, etc) while under Roman occupation. This would make them a relatively large minority in the Roman empire, assuming followers stretch from old Carthage to Israel. Of course, many of them would be forced to convert by the sword or killed by the Romans as Christianity becomes the state religion, but as you mentioned this would lead to them adopting more Abrahamic influences in order to adapt to the times, leading to this cult to form. After the fall of Rome there is a small period of peace, and by this time this Ba'al/Asherah cult begins to form a solid structure and hierarchy, and with it twin "Popes" tradition. There is some tensions, but they tend to live in peace beside Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians.

And then the Muslim conquests came. Life under the Umayyad Caliphate was rough; discrimination and pressure to convert was constant, but as long as there taxes were paid they would not be killed. However, come the Abbassids, Seljuk Turks, and later the Ottomans, persecution became a very regular occurrence. The dual "Popes" would almost always be in hiding, and their attitudes towards sex and women would earn them distrust and hate. A type of diaspora would occur during this time, with many of them fleeing to the coasts of the Caspian Sea (Russia and Azerbaijan), some to India (much like the Zoroastrians), but many would have to stay in the Levant. Again, like the Zoroastrians, they would be a marginalized and persecuted group up to the 21st century, with discrimination renewing for the Caspian population under the USSR.

Open conversion has kept their numbers steady, but any and all growth is typically very slow. Worldwide, I'd probably say their number of worshipers would be around 8-9 million. They'd live in isolated communities across the Levant, with the majority of their follower along the western coast of the Caspian sea and spread out across the Mediterranean (Cyprus, Crete, Sardinia, Sicily, etc.) in some of the traditional Carthaginian lands.

Offline TheVillainTopic starter

Re: Let's Make Up A Religion! [M lf F, Light]
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 09:56:49 AM »
I liked the vast majority of that but there's a bit at the end that I think would go differently.

It's a well known statistical trend that in more modernized populations religiousity goes down. In among traditionally Western countries the Atheistic/Agnostic Religious Group is the only group that is growing overall, and a lot of the growth that is seen of the other groups is an artifact of immigration.

Canaanite Paganism is also experiencing this shrinkage of congregation numbers, but at a significantly smaller rate. This is believed to be because to a modern comparer of religions Canaanite Paganism appears to avoid many of the social pitfalls of other major religions. Female worshippers of Ba'al and Asherah claim that their religion completely lacks the rampant mysogyny of the other major religions for example. [Which if we're being fully honest isn't entirely true. Less mysogynistic, sure - but with the emphasis and social pressure female worshippers recieve to have children it's hard to argue that they lack it entirely.] Canaanite Paganism also appears at a glance to be more accepting of the LGBT community and modern liberal sexual views. [But, again, a closer look reveals that at least some of this reputation is just an artifact of comparing Canaanite Paganism to other major religions.]

In short, in Western/Modern countries Canaanite Paganism has a reputation among more secular/liberal populations of being better then most alternatives, but this reputation isn't entirely warrented. Like every other religion it isn't perfect and it's certainly run by human beings.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 10:16:19 AM by TheVillain »

Offline VonHellsing

  • Praetor of Gentle Femdom; Field-Marshall of Annoyance and Bad Exposition
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  • Join Date: Apr 2017
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Re: Let's Make Up A Religion! [M lf F, Light]
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2017, 12:24:13 PM »
I liked the vast majority of that but there's a bit at the end that I think would go differently.

It's a well known statistical trend that in more modernized populations religiousity goes down. In among traditionally Western countries the Atheistic/Agnostic Religious Group is the only group that is growing overall, and a lot of the growth that is seen of the other groups is an artifact of immigration.

Canaanite Paganism is also experiencing this shrinkage of congregation numbers, but at a significantly smaller rate. This is believed to be because to a modern comparer of religions Canaanite Paganism appears to avoid many of the social pitfalls of other major religions. Female worshippers of Ba'al and Asherah claim that their religion completely lacks the rampant mysogyny of the other major religions for example. [Which if we're being fully honest isn't entirely true. Less mysogynistic, sure - but with the emphasis and social pressure female worshippers recieve to have children it's hard to argue that they lack it entirely.] Canaanite Paganism also appears at a glance to be more accepting of the LGBT community and modern liberal sexual views. [But, again, a closer look reveals that at least some of this reputation is just an artifact of comparing Canaanite Paganism to other major religions.]

In short, in Western/Modern countries Canaanite Paganism has a reputation among more secular/liberal populations of being better then most alternatives, but this reputation isn't entirely warrented. Like every other religion it isn't perfect and it's certainly run by human beings.

I completely agree with those points. I'd imagine in more liberal Western media it would be praised for its more "progressive" views, but its reputation would be a tad bit overblown and exaggerated compared to the actual truth.

Many followers of Canaanite Paganism may not even be wholly dedicated to it. Like in Japan; many people celebrate Christmas/Easter and have Christian weddings, but also pray at Shinto shrines and practice Buddhist traditions. Actual full-time members of the Canaanite Paganism community would be a little rarer than what most people think, while some would practice elements of it in conjunction with others religions as simply traditions from a bygone era. I'd imagine it would have a relatively large community of younger people in most Western countries who would embrace its more freethinking ideology and beliefs on sex, but are not really dedicated in terms of worship and actually believing in Ba'al/Asherah.