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Author Topic: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~  (Read 18212 times)

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Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #350 on: September 30, 2018, 09:00:46 PM »
Hello wonderful Word of the Day participants!  <3

As you know, October is right around the corner. It's such a wonderful time for inspiration, especially for stories that have the potential to scare a reader. Allow us to introduce you to Macabre Month.

Each day, in addition to posting a word, we will also post a spooky picture. You can interpret the picture however you would like for your spook filled tale. Please remember that we are in the non-adult section. Our limits are no nudity, extreme violence, or sexual acts. Heavy kissing and usage of obscenities are acceptable for this board.

If you rather not participate in Macabre Month, that is okay! Continue using the WoTD thread as usual. You can still use whatever word inspires you from a current or previous post.

If you have any questions, please let us know. The first spooky picture will be posted tomorrow!

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #351 on: October 01, 2018, 08:23:54 AM »
I should be working on my creepypasta but I couldn't resist that image!

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #352 on: October 01, 2018, 08:24:55 AM »
Oh no! We don't want to distract you from that. xD

Edit: Just finished though. Your post was a great way to get us started. ❤
« Last Edit: October 01, 2018, 08:41:11 AM by Flower »

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #353 on: October 01, 2018, 08:42:48 AM »
Yay~

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #354 on: October 01, 2018, 08:27:54 PM »
Wooo! Newcomers to the word! Both of you had great contributions too. I enjoyed reading them.

Offline Endscape

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #355 on: October 01, 2018, 08:33:43 PM »
It was certainly my pleasure to write that. The whetstone of practice sharpens and hones, after all. :)

Offline Strega

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #356 on: October 02, 2018, 04:56:00 AM »
Wooo I was just reading Liam's spooky story.
Nice work!  >:)

Offline Strega

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #357 on: October 02, 2018, 06:07:45 AM »
Endscape, that was tense!

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #358 on: October 02, 2018, 07:59:25 AM »
I love the poem, Liam. (^^)

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #359 on: October 02, 2018, 08:10:05 AM »
Thank you! ♥

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #360 on: October 03, 2018, 04:52:55 AM »
Today's word is odd so here's an explanation.

Did You Know?

The word weltschmerz initially came into being as a by-product of the European Romanticism movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A combining of the German words for "world" (Welt) and "pain" (Schmerz), weltschmerz aptly captures the melancholy and pessimism that often characterized the artistic expressions of the era. The term was used in German by the Romantic author Jean Paul (pseudonym of Johann Paul Friedrich Richter) in his 1827 novel Selina, but it wasn't adopted into English until the middle of the 19th century.

Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #361 on: October 03, 2018, 06:56:15 AM »
Since this month started, every morning I'm like Challenge Accepted :P

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #362 on: October 04, 2018, 05:01:03 AM »
I'm glad you guys are enjoying them.

Did You Know?

We bet you thought intestine was a noun referring to a part of the digestive system! It is, of course, but naming that internal body part isn't the word's only function. Both the noun and the adjective intestine have been a part of English since the 15th century, and both trace to the Latin adjective intestinus, meaning "internal," and ultimately to intus, meaning "within." Though the adjective intestine turns up much less frequently than does its anatomical cousin, it does see occasional use, especially as a synonym for civil and domestic (in contrast to foreign) applied to wars and disturbances.

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #363 on: October 08, 2018, 07:50:13 AM »
Did You Know?

You may not be reflecting on the history of the word Occident as you watch a beautiful sunset, but there is a connection. Occident, which comes from Latin occidere, meaning "to fall," once referred to the part of the sky in which the sun goes down. Geoffrey Chaucer used the word in that now-obsolete sense around 1390 in The Man of Law's Tale. In an earlier work, The Monk's Tale, which was written circa 1375, he used the word in the "western regions and countries" sense that we still use. Exactly what is meant by "western" is not always the same. Originally, Occident referred to western Europe or the Western Roman Empire. In modern times, it usually refers to some portion of Europe and North America as distinct from Asia. The opposite of Occident is Orient, which comes from Latin oriri ("to rise").

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #364 on: October 09, 2018, 05:49:41 PM »



CONGRATULATIONS Loiosh !
You've made it into E's WotD Hall of Fame!




Offline Liam Dale

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #365 on: October 09, 2018, 06:16:33 PM »
Congrats!

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #366 on: October 10, 2018, 09:40:03 PM »
Congrats!


Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #367 on: October 11, 2018, 08:16:05 AM »
Did You Know?

By and large is originally a sailing term meaning "alternately close-hauled and not close-hauled." A ship that is sailing "close-hauled" is sailing as directly into the wind as possible (typically within about 45 degrees of the wind). The by part of the phrase means "close-hauled." (This by also appears in the term full and by, meaning "sailing with all sails full and as close to the wind as possible.") Large, by contrast, refers to a point of sail in which the wind is hitting the boat "abaft the beam," or behind the boat's widest point. A 1669 example of a variant spelling of by and large gives us a sense of the range implied: "Thus you see the ship handled in fair weather and foul, by and learge" (S. Sturmy, Mariners Magazine). The suggestion of a wide range carries over into the term's "in general" sense.

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #368 on: October 17, 2018, 05:38:37 AM »
Because this one is a bit odd...



Acceptation is older than its synonym acceptance; it first appeared in print in the 15th century, whereas acceptance makes a 16th-century appearance. Grammarian H. W. Fowler insisted in 1926 that acceptation and acceptance were not actually synonymous (he preferred to reserve acceptation for the "accepted meaning" use), but the earliest meaning of acceptation was indeed acceptance. Both words descend from the Anglo-French word accepter ("to accept"), but acceptation took an extra step. Anglo-French added the -ation ending, which was changed to form acceptacioun in Middle English. (English embraced the present-day -ation ending later.) Acceptance simply comes from accepter plus the Anglo-French -ance.


Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #369 on: October 19, 2018, 03:31:33 PM »
Word of the Day will be posted shortly. Things got a little crazy this morning. (Stupid alarm clock)

Offline Flower

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Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #370 on: November 01, 2018, 04:28:29 AM »
I just wanted to drop in and thank everyone who did Halloween contributions! It was a fun month. xD



Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #371 on: November 02, 2018, 05:33:39 AM »
Did You Know?

Connive may not seem like a troublesome term, but it was to Wilson Follett, a usage critic who lamented that the word "was undone during the Second World War, when restless spirits felt the need of a new synonym for plotting, bribing, spying, conspiring, engineering a coup, preparing a secret attack." Follett thought connive should only mean "to wink at" or "to pretend ignorance." Those senses are closer to the Latin ancestor of the word: connive comes from the Latin connivēre, which means "to close the eyes" and which is descended from -nivēre, a form akin to the Latin verb nictare, meaning "to wink." But many English speakers disagreed, and the "conspire" sense is now the word's most widely used meaning.

Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #372 on: November 07, 2018, 06:53:10 AM »
Did You Know?

Derring-do is a quirky holdover from Middle English that came to occupy its present place in the language by a series of mistakes and misunderstandings. In Middle English, dorring don meant simply "daring to do." For example, Geoffrey Chaucer used dorring don around 1374 when he described a knight "daring to do" brave deeds. The phrase was misprinted as derring do in a 16th-century edition of a 15th-century work by poet John Lydgate, and Edmund Spenser took it up from there, assuming it was meant as a substantive, or noun phrase. (A glossary to Spenser's work defined it as "manhood and chevalrie.") Sir Walter Scott and others in the 19th century got the phrase from Spenser and brought it into modern use.

Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #373 on: November 08, 2018, 05:54:37 AM »
Just wanted take a moment to give a shoutout to some of our long-time contributors. You folks may have passed the ten-mark and made the wall of fame, but all the more awesome for sticking with us. I can only hope we can continue to entertain for time to come!

Thanks to the following returning posters who made October and November so great:


Lilias

Shores

Liam Dale

Remec

Nico



Again, thanks for contributing, folks.  Oh, and remember, if there's something you liked or didn't like, or would like to see, we're all ears!

Online Justric

Re: ~ Word of the Day: Feedback & Comments! ~
« Reply #374 on: November 14, 2018, 05:40:59 AM »
Did You Know?

In the Middle Ages, Thome Fole was a name assigned to those perceived to be of little intelligence. This eventually evolved into the spelling tomfool, which, when capitalized, also referred to a professional clown or a buffoon in a play or pageant. The name Tom seems to have been chosen for its common-man quality, much like Joe Blow for an ordinary person or Johnny Reb for a soldier in the Confederate army, but tomfoolery need not apply strictly to actions by men. In Lucy Maud Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables (1908), for example, Marilla Cuthbert complains of Anne: "She's gadding off somewhere with Diana, writing stories or practicing dialogues or some such tomfoolery, and never thinking once about the time or her duties."