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Author Topic: Rock Music the secret everyone seems to overlook.  (Read 978 times)

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Offline Tamhansen

Re: Rock Music the secret everyone seems to overlook.
« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2016, 11:37:34 AM »
We can remember the times when Sepultura and their followers had made Brazil the world capital of thrash. ;)

For a second there I read the capital of trash, which in the case of Sepultura after the Cabalera fight is true as well, I guess.
Ahhh another black kid complaining about a type of music they shouldn't even be listening to.... or so we all thought. Fun fact rock music was actually created by a black woman and then made more popular by a black man... a bisexual makeup wearing black man! Oh my god?!?!? Who would have thought all these years of me being too 'white' turns out I'm so far in my roots that I should rocking afros and screaming about how black I am.

It's just weird to me that nobody recognizes that rock music was the 'devil's music' before Elvis got his grubby fingers on some good songs stole them and sold them to the mainstream masses (which they happily accepted because he was white). Lol I'll save my Elvis rant for some other time because boy do I have a lot of complaining to do about Elvis.

I think I know where this confusion some people over the origins of Rock comes from.
Rock music was called rock music after it started to be performed by white artists, which is why rock music is seen as white people music, while the same styles of music by black performers were called R&B and later Funk/Motown.

Also, Elvis' type of music wasn't 'easily accepted' there was a lot of protest and even threats by conservative white people, exactly because he played 'black music' The people that made Elvis and his white compatriots big were mostly the people who were already listening to R&B, but the white artists helped to slowly get it accepted. Not without a fight or two though.

The same is true by the way for earlier music, like SDJ and his work in the rat pack. Sammy had to go in the service entrance to many venue where he was the head performer that night.

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I mean devil's music as in black's music. That's right all these heavy riffs and Heil hitler crabtarts got their sacred music from a black woman...No but seriously am I the only one who has noticed the weird rise of neonazi-isms in rock music these days(lol I mean since hairbands were cool)? As a black female who has always enjoyed a good heavy rock song I can't help but to feel super weird about it. People in rock music seem to say heil Hitler for fun and talk about how they don't like black people or Jews and so on.

Not sure where you go to concerts, as most headline rockbands tend to be quite heavily antifascist, and bullshit like that is often swiftly dealt with. There is the odd exception of course, (I'm looking at you Phil Anselmo) but I'm sorry your experiences have been so bad. Nobody should have to suffer that, and as a mostly white rock artist I apologise.

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I was even harassed at my best friends boyfriends show the other night. Some dude pointed me out because I 'didn't look like I was having fun.' Then proceeded to tell me 'I should go listen to some Lil Wayne because I obviously didn't know good music'. Firstly, who the hell still listens to Lil Wayne?!?. Secondly, I was there to support a great friend of mine do something he loves and I was actually having fun until this poopsicle shows up and starts yelling in my face. It was a good thing I didn't wanna pay fifteen bucks per drank or I would lost my usual calm demeanor.
Again, sorry you had that experience. (Truly, Lil' Wayne is a faith worse than death :P) I really hope jackasses like that haven't put you of your love for Rock music, whether it is made by White, Black, Yellow, Purple or green people.
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Anyway that's my rant. Respond if you want. Tell me how all rock shows aren't like this. Or perhaps even tell me how black people didn't start rock or all of Elvis music was original (Jk don't tell me that. I'll literally lose my shit laughing at your gullibleness).

Of course All of Elvis' music was completely original, how can anyone think otherwise. Just like Vanilla Ice obviously didn't steal that baseline off Queen. ;)
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Re: Rock Music the secret everyone seems to overlook.
« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2016, 01:49:23 PM »
Not sure where you go to concerts, as most headline rockbands tend to be quite heavily antifascist, and bullshit like that is often swiftly dealt with. There is the odd exception of course, (I'm looking at you Phil Anselmo) but I'm sorry your experiences have been so bad. Nobody should have to suffer that, and as a mostly white rock artist I apologise.

There's a segment of metal that attracts a higher percentage of racially-intolerant fans.  I'm not sure if the bands themselves promote that attitude (haven't listened to enough of that genre to find out), but they aren't actively telling their fans it isn't right.

Offline gaggedLouise

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Re: Rock Music the secret everyone seems to overlook.
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2016, 04:12:22 PM »
I think Ginger Baker (from Cream) helped get these guys a recording deal with EMI in England and better distribution in the UK and Europe for their records - back in 1970/71 they were almost unknown outside of their native Nigeria. He also sat in on this live album around the same time, as a guest drummer together with Tony Allen, whom he had become really hooked on. A great meeting of minds and races, and a song that sounds like a black power anthem.

Most of the lyrics are in the Youruba language, but the force of the music, the horns and Fela's voice just grabs one by the arm.



Hey, here's the full album by the way:

« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 04:14:44 PM by gaggedLouise »