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Author Topic: Turkey military coup  (Read 1156 times)

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Offline gaggedLouise

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Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2016, 02:57:18 AM »
Wikileaks is making Chrome go "uh, we're detecting forced malware installs, we don't want you to go there". Can anyone get us an archive link or some sort of mirror?

Try opening an anonymous (incognito) tab if it won't work in a normal window.

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Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2016, 03:00:41 AM »
Unsurprisingly, Erdogan has declared a whole three months of martial law. Giving himself time to finish the purges and transfer all power to himself?

Just saw that a Turkish professor has dubbed it "the Reichstag fire of modern Turkey". Just like Hitler used the enigmatic night of arson on the parliament to expand his powers and drive home a sense of urgency...

Online Norwegian One

Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #27 on: July 21, 2016, 03:02:29 AM »
Just saw that a Turkish professor has dubbed it "the Reichstag fire of modern Turkey". Just like Hitler used the enigmatic night of arson on the parliament to expand his powers and drive home a sense of urgency...

Yup, pretty much. Erdogan is using it for all it's worth.

Online Cassandra LeMay

Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2016, 04:44:44 AM »
To me it seems reasonable to assume, from the speed things have been happening in Turkey the last few days, that Erdogan had lists of people he wanted to get rid of already at hand. If that is true we can thank the coup for giving him an opportunity to do it all in one fell swoop. Without it the same might have happened, but spread over maybe a few years. At least now Erdogan's actions are so plain to see that they will not fly under the radar of Western media. Without the coup we might never even have noticed what was going on.

Not that it will make any difference to him, but still...

Online Norwegian One

Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2016, 07:58:18 AM »
To me it seems reasonable to assume, from the speed things have been happening in Turkey the last few days, that Erdogan had lists of people he wanted to get rid of already at hand. If that is true we can thank the coup for giving him an opportunity to do it all in one fell swoop. Without it the same might have happened, but spread over maybe a few years. At least now Erdogan's actions are so plain to see that they will not fly under the radar of Western media. Without the coup we might never even have noticed what was going on.

Not that it will make any difference to him, but still...

Yeah, they have probably had ready-made lists of suspected opposition and people who disagree. The coup has simply given Erdogan an excuse to hasten the removal of those who oppose him. And now it's being reported that Turkey has suspended their obligation to the Human Rights Convention. Nothing bad could possibly come of this, right?

Online Cassandra LeMay

Re: Turkey military coup
« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2016, 08:55:45 AM »
And now it's being reported that Turkey has suspended their obligation to the Human Rights Convention. Nothing bad could possibly come of this, right?
It has happened in other countries before, and I am not sure if the current state of emergency in France doesn't also suspend at least some parts of the ECHR.

What few mentions of this I have seen so far have not been detailed at all, but Contracting Parties to the ECHR have the right to suspend most of the Convention during certain emergencies.

Quote
ARTICLE 15
Derogation in time of emergency
1.  In  time  of  war  or  other  public  emergency  threatening  the  life of the nation any High Contracting Party may take measures
derogating from its obligations under this Convention to the extent strictly required by the exigencies of the situation, provided that
such measures are not inconsistent with its other obligations under international law.
2.   No   derogation   from   Article   2,   except   in   respect   of  deaths  resulting  from  lawful  acts  of  war,  or  from  Articles  3,  4 
(paragraph 1) and 7 shall be made under this provision.
3.  ... [concerns keeping the Council of Europe informed of all measures taken]
The articles mentioned under #2. are right to life, prohibition against torture, prohibition of slavery/forced labor, and the "no punishment without law" clauses.