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Author Topic: Enter Pluto: The First Visit by a Spacecraft to this Dark, Cold World  (Read 2538 times)

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Offline Dashenka


Offline Chrystal

Re: Enter Pluto: The First Visit by a Spacecraft to this Dark, Cold World
« Reply #26 on: July 18, 2015, 02:25:22 PM »
Closer images of pluto cause concern to NASA scientists


Offline Sir Percival the GallantTopic starter

Re: Enter Pluto: The First Visit by a Spacecraft to this Dark, Cold World
« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2015, 06:53:11 PM »
More images and news from New Horizons.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/18/science/space/pluto-terrain-yields-big-surprises-in-new-horizons-images.html?smid=tw-nytimes&_r=0

Really interesting. I never expected there to be geological activity like this out there. Of course, I'm also interested to see what they name everything—names from traditional mythologies of underworlds and their denizens, as well as stuff from Tolkien and Lovecraft are on the bill.


Closer images of pluto cause concern to NASA scientists



Oh, that'd be Saturn's moon Mimas.  ;)


Offline Peripherie

Re: Enter Pluto: The First Visit by a Spacecraft to this Dark, Cold World
« Reply #28 on: July 18, 2015, 08:05:05 PM »
Well, I wasn't limiting it to ice.  Any crystalline structure with 6-fold symmetry is going to have natural fracture lines at 120 degrees.  Bubbles (or other free-forming spherical shapes) will always meet at a 120-degree angle when three come into contact.  There's also this interesting bit of synchronicity.  Measuring by eye, the 137-degree angle doesn't look a whole lot different from a 120 degree angle.

Saturn has a hexagon shaped cloud formation as well - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn%27s_hexagon