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Author Topic: Let's talk music!  (Read 3099 times)

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #50 on: April 02, 2015, 06:47:05 PM »
Mmm... interesting, kind of an homage to all that psychedelic stuff in the sixties on the Cydonia one. 


Offline BeorningTopic starter

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #51 on: April 03, 2015, 02:27:34 PM »
I'd say it's not only the 60s... There's a ton of references in that video.

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #52 on: April 03, 2015, 02:58:59 PM »
I was speaking specifically on the music. XD

Offline BeorningTopic starter

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #53 on: April 03, 2015, 03:37:03 PM »
I admit I'm not that versed in music, so I'll take your word on it :)

Offline Joel

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #54 on: April 03, 2015, 03:54:19 PM »


Here's some more lo-fi fun.
Minotaur Shock's album "Orchard"

and this should so follow knights of cydonia for you know... more non-sequitor.
Takeshi Terauchi & The Bunnys -- Dark Eyes


Offline Joel

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #55 on: April 04, 2015, 12:20:35 AM »


Oh haha, you might enjoy this Beorning.  Its the live performance of Knights of Cydonia with a mashup of Man With a Harmonica.




Offline BeorningTopic starter

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #56 on: April 04, 2015, 02:04:48 PM »
Thanks! The opening parts are just epic...

On another note, more Nick Cave for all of you:


Offline Joel

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #57 on: April 05, 2015, 12:46:47 AM »

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #58 on: April 05, 2015, 06:47:32 PM »
Anyone else like jazz? I love jazz, especially New Orleans style jazz. Obligatory Post-Modern Jukebox vid (they do good Jazz covers).


Offline Lux12

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #59 on: April 05, 2015, 09:16:10 PM »
Jazz is lovely. I personally lean toward the "classic" jazz sound, acid, smooth, and cool jazz forms. Though I do have a soft spot for swing. I also like the experimental end of jazz as performed by the likes of Sun Ra. John Coltrane some times dipped into the avant garde end himself. He's also one of my favorite musicians in the genre. Of all the old greats, Duke Ellington, Sun Ra, Herbie Hancock, and Coltrane are my favorites.

Offline Joel

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #60 on: April 05, 2015, 09:27:23 PM »
well along the lines of big band meets modern...

Squirrel Nut Zippers -- Good Enough For Granddad

turns retooled rockabilly

Stray Cats -- (She's) Sexy and 17

turns psychobilly!

Reverend Horton Heat -- The Devil's Chasing Me

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #61 on: April 07, 2015, 07:30:24 PM »
Anyone else loving that Funk seems to making a comeback?



Considering the artist is English, I posit that Funk is universal  8-)

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #62 on: October 25, 2015, 06:56:17 PM »


So I heard this one on the radio on the way into work. Got to say they're worth a listen.


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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #63 on: October 26, 2015, 08:31:59 PM »
Wish I'd caught this thread sooner...now I have to address some of the earliest comments :)  I'm a lover of music as far back as I can remember.  My parents--especially my father--are lovers of all genres and ages of music.  In one day when I was a kid in the 70s, my dad could play Tchaikovsky, Iron Butterfly, Wes Montgomery, Glenn Miller, Tomita, The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, and the Mothers of Invention.  I love music for its ability to provoke emotional responses, and I tend to be very moved by some music...I usually post those kinds of songs, hoping to expose them to others for their value in reaching the unplumbed cores of our own hearts and minds.

I loved Annie Lennox's short hair look.  She was a wall breaker in the 80s for women, and an intriguing lyric writer as well.

I discovered Postmodern Jukebox mid-summer, and I'm in love with them.  Right now, I have far too many of their songs I play every day, but my two favorites are their version of Creep by Radiohead...




...and Boulevard of Broken Dreams by Green Day:



It's amazing how Scott Bradlee collects musicians who retain the original emotional impact of the songs, but infuse their own vitality into them.

I'm not religious, but...Freddy Mercury could be my god...the man was incredible, both as a songwriter, pianist, singer, and performer.  He left us far, far too early, and we lost untold musical beauty because of it.

Also, Brian May is awesome.  I saw him on an astrophysics podcast and I couldn't stop grinning...he's like the real-life version of Buckaroo Banzai crossed with Bill Nye.

Losing My Religion
was a great song by a great U.S. rock band.  I don't know how many of you understand the term--the title is a Southern euphemism for getting royally pissed off at someone or blowing your stack, so it lends another facet to the lyrics.

I got into Kate Bush in the early 80s when I was in high school.  It didn't hurt that I had a crush on her, but I didn't initially find her singing as fascinating as I do now.  Now that I'm much more knowledgeable of the technicalities of singing, I'm in awe of her and her ability.  Her lyrics tended to be very dark, deep, or intense.  Songs like Breathing and Army Dreamers played on us 80s children's fears of nuclear annihilation and the Cold War.  Some of her songs are just heartbreaking, like Cloudbusting.  The videos usually came off as melodramatic, but this was the 80s, and it didn't change the scope of her voice and lyrics combined.




I listen to all kinds of music, and in the last couple of years, I've really enjoyed EDM, particularly dubstep, drum 'n' bass, and trap.  However, what I've really gotten addicted to are mashups, where two or more songs are combined by a producer or DJ.  Some of the combinations are amazing, and completely unexpected, like this:



The music is most of it, but the video is a kick as well :D


Some of the creators of these mashups seem to try the most vivid and unexpected combinations...Metallica vs Stevie Wonder was a good example, but there are others, like Linkin Park vs Lady Gaga, ZZTop vs Public Enemy, Van Halen vs ABBA, Frankie Goes To Hollywood vs Iron Maiden, Ariana Grande vs Dire Straights, Taylor Swift vs Black Sabbath...even PSY vs Ghostbusters.  This one combines five cuts together:




DJs From Mars are one of the best mashup outfits.  This is just one example of their prowess:





« Last Edit: October 26, 2015, 08:47:53 PM by HannibalBarca »

Offline BCdan

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #64 on: November 05, 2015, 11:30:27 PM »
Lately I have been big on The Good Natured.





And then when I feel angry...


Offline Ash

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2015, 04:03:32 AM »
Lets talk about Postmodern Jukebox. I love these guys. The pianist Scott Bradlee did the piano work for the circa 1900 honky-tonk version of the Tears for Fears song Everybody Wants to rule the world. I love anachronistic stuff like this. :3





This was amazing. Now I must go search for more!

Offline Cyrano Johnson

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #66 on: November 27, 2015, 12:25:21 AM »
Music. Right.

Right now I'm listening to the new Bowie almost obsessively, because it's goddamned gorgeous and characteristically Bowie brilliance:



It is cray-cray and the video work enriches the song tremendously, which isn't always the case. It has the "this is Satanism!" fundygelicals up in arms, of course, but for once they have sort of a point: the video is drenched in occult and arguably Satanic imagery -- FAR more important, arguably, than the "this completes the Major Tom trilogy" stuff that some people keep talking about, though that's a minor part of the mix -- and you don't need to be a Westboro Baptist prat to see it. Bowie is quite obviously taking the piss out of that imagery as much as anything else, of course, and naturally they miss that being the humourless gits that they are, but it's very much there.

I'm currently listening to it in a mix with much less ironically-satanistic music, like for example King Dude:





Who, I have a certain (limited) degree of sympathy with Crowleyism as my profile attests, but I'm far from being any kind of actual Satanist; nevertheless the arch wit and musical sensibility in their work is compelling and surmounts the rather cheesy confines of religious ideology going on.

Recently playing Life is Strange put me in touch with my bittersweet folk inclinations, which also have me listening to material like this:



Most of all, though? Funk and soul. Some overdue discoveries, especially Zero 7:



... and some fresh ones, like James Blake:



All of it badass. Great time to be alive, musically speaking.

The Eagles of Death Metal just released their first interview after the Paris attacks. Their cover for "Save a Prayer" has become a fundraiser for victims of those attacks, with the cooperation of Simon Le Bon. So, noteworthy.

« Last Edit: November 27, 2015, 12:31:45 AM by Cyrano Johnson »

Offline BeorningTopic starter

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #67 on: November 27, 2015, 03:49:10 PM »
Right now I'm listening to the new Bowie almost obsessively, because it's goddamned gorgeous and characteristically Bowie brilliance:



It is cray-cray and the video work enriches the song tremendously, which isn't always the case. It has the "this is Satanism!" fundygelicals up in arms, of course, but for once they have sort of a point: the video is drenched in occult and arguably Satanic imagery -- FAR more important, arguably, than the "this completes the Major Tom trilogy" stuff that some people keep talking about, though that's a minor part of the mix -- and you don't need to be a Westboro Baptist prat to see it. Bowie is quite obviously taking the piss out of that imagery as much as anything else, of course, and naturally they miss that being the humourless gits that they are, but it's very much there.

.... okay, that's creepy as hell. Could you explain this video to me? Where's the Satanic imaginery specifically and where's the humour?

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #68 on: November 29, 2015, 05:53:33 PM »
I guess it is fairly creepy, isn't it. :D Well, as far as the Satanic / Occult imagery goes, here's the way I see it:

Spoiler: Click to Show/Hide
- The title, "Blackstar," is evocative of a number of things occult, including references in Thelema and latter-day Gnostic creeds in which Stars figure prominently -- "I believe in one secret and ineffable LORD; and in one Star in the Company of Stars of whose fire we are created, and to which we shall return." Contrary to what the Christianist critics imagine, this is not actually quoting anything from Crowley... but it could be seen as giving such sentiments a "black magic" twist.

This of course would all be irrelevant babbling if it weren't for the rest of the imagery in the video.

- The video and song seem to take place from the viewpoint of a black magic cult. The dead astronaut in the beginning, aside from being a visual quotation of "Major Tom" from his earlier "space" songs, resonates curiously with direct reference in the lyrics to fallen angels -- "how many times can an angel fall" -- and of course there's the matter of his skull being a jewelled artifact and becoming the object of cult veneration. Those who read this as symbolically alluding to occult power acquired from fallen angels (or demonic sources) have something of a point. That reading is at the very least being heavily implied.

- The random tail on the girl who finds the skull is probably just a random tail that they thought would be sexy. But it's hard to believe they didn't also realize that certain people would read it as a devil's tail; it's also baiting the occult / black magic reading.

- Button-Eyes Bowie and his acolytes are carefully calibrated to a) look like they're engaged in something like religious worship and b) look like what they're doing is a creepy, sinister mockery of religious worship. The twitchy, "possessed"-looking dancing has been seen before in "Fashion", where it kind of functioned as an arch commentary on fashion-worship. Here it's a commentary on worship generally, maybe, both the occult variety and maybe those of "mainstream" religion (though the Christian critics will see only the latter critique). 

- Preacher-Bowie ostentatiously brandishing the Black Star Bible in Maoist propaganda poster style and Trickster-Bowie singing "Something happened on the day he died / Spirit rose a meter and stepped aside / Somebody else took his place and bravely cried / 'I'm a blackstar! I'm a blackstar!'" are both presenting the cult being portrayed, and perhaps also the Christianity* that cult is lampooning, as being rooted in deception, con-artistry and propaganda. Trickster-Bowie actually literally thumbs his nose at his would-be followers. This is where the humour comes in, at least partly: he's lampooning everyone, the act of being a follower itself.

- * And it's clearly Christianity being referred to, both in the thicket of references to "execution" (w/ possible mocking twist on the Lamentation of Christ, traditionally attended mostly by women, in "on the day of execution / only women kneel and smile"), rising spirits and in the later visual appearance of scarecrows set up to echo the Crucifixion. The video's director claims that nobody involved was consciously aware of crucifixion imagery with the writhing scarecrows. I flat-out don't believe him, and I especially don't believe it of the immensely literate Bowie, on whom such an obvious parallel couldn't possibly be lost.

- The group of women worshiping "Major Tom's" skull are thirteen in number, a fairly unmistakable reference to the traditional numbers of a witches' coven. The "ritual" itself has the Christianists fooled into thinking they're seeing actual witchcraft, which, I don't know that much about the specific of pagan ritual but I very much doubt there's anything much here to suggest a real magickal rite, it's mostly just random slightly-sinister dancing. But it's certainly working hard to evoke the general sensibility of being an occult ritual.

- The Christianist "it's Satanism!" bedwetters, however, seem to entirely miss the whole last part of the video... because this ritual appears to actually summon something, and it's a horrific chthonic monster out of the darkest days of Doctor Who's props budget. Which again strikes me as an arch commentary -- one Crowley would have certainly agreed with -- on what you can actually expect to get out of playing with black magic, with being a "black" Star, as it were. (Again the question is open as to what degree this critique extends to all religion.)

So that's what I'm getting out of it. Of course a couple of caveats are in order: first, I'm strictly an amateur as anything pertaining to pagan ritual or the occult goes, so my interpretations are just based on what a semi-educated amateur comes most commonly into contact with, I wouldn't call my perspective "scholarly." Second, the video's makers would of course just say it's all a bunch of random "cool" imagery that evolved organically and that any exercise like this one is massively over-analyzing it, so take all this with a grain of salt. I'm only willing to analyze it in the extent to which the images and language involved seem to fall into patterns too precise for their to be really random. Anyway, I think all of the occult japery adds to the song and my appreciation of it rather than detracting from it. YMMV. ;)
« Last Edit: November 29, 2015, 10:35:35 PM by Cyrano Johnson »

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #69 on: November 29, 2015, 09:13:02 PM »


If you want to talk about formative songs a kid can listen to, this is basically the seedling that planted the first story I thought I could ever make a novel out of. :)

Offline BeorningTopic starter

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #70 on: November 30, 2015, 03:56:42 PM »
"The Sound of Silence" is a beautiful song... I can agree with that.

Well, as far as the Satanic / Occult imagery goes, here's the way I see it:

- The title, "Blackstar," is evocative of a number of things occult, including references in Thelema and latter-day Gnostic creeds in which Stars figure prominently -- "I believe in one secret and ineffable LORD; and in one Star in the Company of Stars of whose fire we are created, and to which we shall return." Contrary to what the Christianist critics imagine, this is not actually quoting anything from Crowley... but it could be seen as giving such sentiments a "black magic" twist.

Well, no argument here :)

Quote
This of course would all be irrelevant babbling if it weren't for the rest of the imagery in the video.

- The video and song seem to take place from the viewpoint of a black magic cult. The dead astronaut in the beginning, aside from being a visual quotation of "Major Tom" from his earlier "space" songs, resonates curiously with direct reference in the lyrics to fallen angels -- "how many times can an angel fall" -- and of course there's the matter of his skull being a jewelled artifact and becoming the object of cult veneration. Those who read this as symbolically alluding to occult power acquired from fallen angels (or demonic sources) have something of a point. That reading is at the very least being heavily implied.

Personally, I see two possible intepretations of the worship of the dead astronaut's skull... One is the "power from a fallen angel" interpretation you present - which would also mean that the ritual in the finale really is a black magic ritual where women get possessed etc. A second explanation I see is the literal one, as in: this is the end of Major Tom's story. He got sucked into a timespace singularity, died and his body crashed down on an alien planet. Then, it was found by the planet's people, who built a whole religion around it... a false religion that makes its worshipper perform mindless rituals. The whole subplot in the video might be a warning against irrationality and religions, then.

Quote
- The random tail on the girl who finds the skull is probably just a random tail that they thought would be sexy. But it's hard to believe they didn't also realize that certain people would read it as a devil's tail; it's also baiting the occult / black magic reading.

I see the tail as having two possible explanations: one, it's meant to indicate that the girl as an alien (and so, the story takes place on another planet). Two, it could be a deliberate attempt at enhacing the demonic mood of the sequence.

On the other hand... you know, where I first saw that girl, I immediately thought that I've seen her already! Compare this:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Troll_woman.gif

Possible inspiration?

Quote
- Button-Eyes Bowie and his acolytes are carefully calibrated to a) look like they're engaged in something like religious worship and b) look like what they're doing is a creepy, sinister mockery of religious worship. The twitchy, "possessed"-looking dancing has been seen before in "Fashion", where it kind of functioned as an arch commentary on fashion-worship. Here it's a commentary on worship generally, maybe, both the occult variety and maybe those of "mainstream" religion (though the Christian critics will see only the latter critique). 

I see these people as being possessed, pure and simple...

BTW. I keep reading that Bowie is supposed to be blind in this part of the video. But, for me, the blindfold doesn't symbolize his blindness... this is a blindfold of a man being led to his execution.

Quote
- Preacher-Bowie ostentatiously brandishing the Black Star Bible in Maoist propaganda poster style and Trickster-Bowie singing "Something happened on the day he died / Spirit rose a meter and stepped aside / Somebody else took his place and bravely cried / 'I'm a blackstar! I'm a blackstar!'" are both presenting the cult being portrayed, and perhaps also the Christianity* that cult is lampooning, as being rooted in deception, con-artistry and propaganda. Trickster-Bowie actually literally thumbs his nose at his would-be followers. This is where the humour comes in, at least partly: he's lampooning everyone, the act of being a follower itself.

I agree that some of the imagery here seems based on the Communist propaganda and that the Bowie's "bible" is supposed to look sinister. Bowie here is a prophet of a "black star cult" or something like that...

Nevertheless, I think that the lyrics tell a different story than just that of the cult being based on con-artistry. To me, this whole section of the song seems to tell of people being deceived by a demon. Specifically, the song tells of a demon that enters a body of an executed man and, then, sets himself up as a false god ("I'm the great I am") and starts spreading his evil gospel that perverts the natural order (notice the Trickster-Bowie telling people that they were "born the wrong way"). The mocking you noticed is the demon mocking the people who follow him.

Quote
- * And it's clearly Christianity being referred to, both in the thicket of references to "execution" (w/ possible mocking twist on the Lamentation of Christ, traditionally attended mostly by women, in "on the day of execution / only women kneel and smile"), rising spirits and in the later visual appearance of scarecrows set up to echo the Crucifixion. The video's director claims that nobody involved was consciously aware of crucifixion imagery with the writhing scarecrows. I flat-out don't believe him, and I especially don't believe it of the immensely literate Bowie, on whom such an obvious parallel couldn't possibly be lost.

The crucifixion imagery is obviously intentional. One thing I'd point out that the scarecrows are initially moving in a semi-ecstatic way... possibly being influenced by the demon prophet's lies? The scarecrows start panicking only when the monster appears to eat them.

Quote
- The group of women worshiping "Major Tom's" skull are thirteen in number, a fairly unmistakable reference to the traditional numbers of a witches' coven. The "ritual" itself has the Christianists fooled into thinking they're seeing actual witchcraft, which, I don't know that much about the specific of pagan ritual but I very much doubt there's anything much here to suggest a real magickal rite, it's mostly just random slightly-sinister dancing. But it's certainly working hard to evoke the general sensibility of being an occult ritual.

Good point about the number of the women, I didn't get that. One thing I have trouble here is that it this scene doesn't neatly mesh with the idea of a "demon prophet" - I keep thinking that the demon entered that world by possessing an executed man, but the whole skull subplot seems to suggest that a woman was contacted by a fallen angel and that led to the creation of the black magic cult... Hm.

But, maybe, all of this does fit together? It could well be that the "religion of evil" in the story was set up by the demon prophet. The religion instituted the black magic witches as its priesthood. And the witches use various kinds of black magic (powered by, say, the remains of dead men - like Major Tom) to cause evil. The monster that appears to devour the poor scarecrows is one example of that evil... And such ceremonies might be taking place on the anniversaries of the demon's arrival, the "execution day". And they are performed by witches, i.e. female priesthood, so "only women kneel and smile".

Quote
- The Christianist "it's Satanism!" bedwetters, however, seem to entirely miss the whole last part of the video... because this ritual appears to actually summon something, and it's a horrific chthonic monster out of the darkest days of Doctor Who's props budget. Which again strikes me as an arch commentary -- one Crowley would have certainly agreed with -- on what you can actually expect to get out of playing with black magic, with being a "black" Star, as it were. (Again the question is open as to what degree this critique extends to all religion.)

True. I see this video as a warning against demons pretending to spread enlightenment, not a veneration of them. And overall, the whole song seems to be a warning against false religions...
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 04:04:33 PM by Beorning »

Offline Cyrano Johnson

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #71 on: December 02, 2015, 12:53:14 AM »
Personally, I see two possible intepretations of the worship of the dead astronaut's skull... One is the "power from a fallen angel" interpretation you present - which would also mean that the ritual in the finale really is a black magic ritual where women get possessed etc. A second explanation I see is the literal one, as in: this is the end of Major Tom's story. He got sucked into a timespace singularity, died and his body crashed down on an alien planet. Then, it was found by the planet's people, who built a whole religion around it... a false religion that makes its worshipper perform mindless rituals. The whole subplot in the video might be a warning against irrationality and religions, then.

I think both interpretations are valid and that the ambiguity is probably deliberate.

Quote
On the other hand... you know, where I first saw that girl, I immediately thought that I've seen her already! Compare this:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Troll_woman.gif

Possible inspiration?

Interesting. :) Maybe so.

Quote
I see these people as being possessed, pure and simple...

Well, I think the dancing is clearly meant to evoke possession in a sort of horror-movie-trope sense. Actual "possession" doesn't usually involve mindless twitching, though, or at least it involves more than that; it's about the evocation of a specific personality that "possesses" the host (with someone from an Abrahamic faith who believes they're being "possessed" it's usually a determinedly blasphemous and sexualized persona, in cases of someone being "ridden" by a loa or orisha in voodoo or santeria the personalities involved are a lot more varied and specific).

Quote
BTW. I keep reading that Bowie is supposed to be blind in this part of the video. But, for me, the blindfold doesn't symbolize his blindness... this is a blindfold of a man being led to his execution.

Also an interesting interpretation, I hadn't thought of that.

Quote
Nevertheless, I think that the lyrics tell a different story than just that of the cult being based on con-artistry. To me, this whole section of the song seems to tell of people being deceived by a demon. Specifically, the song tells of a demon that enters a body of an executed man and, then, sets himself up as a false god ("I'm the great I am") and starts spreading his evil gospel that perverts the natural order (notice the Trickster-Bowie telling people that they were "born the wrong way"). The mocking you noticed is the demon mocking the people who follow him.

I'll go one better: part of what's being hinted at is a fundamental deception being inserted into the Christian tale of resurrection and the "black star" stepping into Christ's place and masquerading as him. So one potential layer here is a suggestion of Christianity itself being a demonic deception.

Quote
Good point about the number of the women, I didn't get that. One thing I have trouble here is that it this scene doesn't neatly mesh with the idea of a "demon prophet" - I keep thinking that the demon entered that world by possessing an executed man, but the whole skull subplot seems to suggest that a woman was contacted by a fallen angel and that led to the creation of the black magic cult... Hm.

I think probably the skull is symbolizing the false valuation / deification being suggested in the parallel demonic-substitution subplot.

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But, maybe, all of this does fit together? It could well be that the "religion of evil" in the story was set up by the demon prophet. The religion instituted the black magic witches as its priesthood. And the witches use various kinds of black magic (powered by, say, the remains of dead men - like Major Tom) to cause evil. The monster that appears to devour the poor scarecrows is one example of that evil... And such ceremonies might be taking place on the anniversaries of the demon's arrival, the "execution day". And they are performed by witches, i.e. female priesthood, so "only women kneel and smile".

That seems like an interesting possibility. Probably all the imagery isn't all meant to reduce to just one narrative but be fertile ground for suggesting possible and equally-valid narratives like that one.

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True. I see this video as a warning against demons pretending to spread enlightenment, not a veneration of them. And overall, the whole song seems to be a warning against false religions...

Comity!
« Last Edit: December 02, 2015, 12:54:31 AM by Cyrano Johnson »

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #72 on: December 02, 2015, 08:16:37 AM »
While this may be a satire, I actually like this song a lot, and appreciate the production value of the video. Plus it's hilarious.


Offline Oniya

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Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #73 on: December 02, 2015, 11:45:10 AM »
Music. Right.

Right now I'm listening to the new Bowie almost obsessively, because it's goddamned gorgeous and characteristically Bowie brilliance:



It is cray-cray and the video work enriches the song tremendously, which isn't always the case. It has the "this is Satanism!" fundygelicals up in arms, of course, but for once they have sort of a point: the video is drenched in occult and arguably Satanic imagery -- FAR more important, arguably, than the "this completes the Major Tom trilogy" stuff that some people keep talking about, though that's a minor part of the mix -- and you don't need to be a Westboro Baptist prat to see it. Bowie is quite obviously taking the piss out of that imagery as much as anything else, of course, and naturally they miss that being the humourless gits that they are, but it's very much there.

The fact that Bowie has a tendency to take pot-shots at sacred cows (q.v. the aforementioned 'Fashion' and 'Fame' as examples) in general makes a lot of the previous discussion seem like it very well might have been running through Bowie's head.  He likes messing with the humorless gits.

Offline BCdan

Re: Let's talk music!
« Reply #74 on: January 05, 2016, 11:22:25 PM »
I thought some of you would get a kick out of this: