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Author Topic: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones)  (Read 1804 times)

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Offline SkynetTopic starter

I had a thread about the World of Darkness, Eclipse Phase, and Pathfinder RPG.  I might as well create one about another popular tabletop trend: old school gaming, specifically retroclones and emulators of Dungeons & Dragons.  This is a work in progress; feel free to add your own suggestions, explanations, and advice if I missed anything.


The Old School Renaissance is basically an online, fan-driven pseudo-movement of gamers and game designers of pre-3rd Edition D&D systems.  Back in 2004, Troll Lord Games published Castles & Crusades, combining old school elements with 3rd Edition rules.  It was a simpler variant to D20, and while flawed in parts (the SIEGE engine's bell curve, for example), it harkened back to a role-playing aesthetic of past decades.

A group of British gamers figured that if old school rules could be published under the OGL (Open Gaming License), then they could do the same with the 1st Edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons.  And so OSRIC (Old School Reference and Index Compilation) was born.  It's purpose was to legally provide publishers a tool to produce gaming material of the underlying rule set.

And it worked!

Over the course of several years fellow gamers followed suit, producing their own rulesets, Edition retroclones, adventures, and supplemental material for their favorite versions of Dungeons & Dragons.  Quite a bit are little more than Open Game variants of said Editions (such as Labyrinth Lord and Swords & Wizardry), but just as many applied new and creative spins to make the games truly their own.  For example, Lamentations of the Flame Princess uses the Basic D&D rules, but with a gritty Weird Fantasy vibe in both mechanics and flavor.  Adventurer Conqueror King System centers around the player characters eventually becoming the rulers of domains and kingdoms.

The OSR isn't an official organization or singular website; it's more of a loose confederation of tabletop gamers with similar tastes.  The "starting point" of the movement is rather vague, some thinking it grew from people dissatisfied with Castles & Crusades, others figure the term first came up on the Dragonsfoot forums.

Tell me about the games!

Well, there's an awful lot of retroclones out there already, and listing them all would take a large portion of text.  I can, however, list some of the more popular ones for the time being.  One of the OSR's strengths is the interchangeability of its rules.  Retroclones modeled after Basic D&D, for example, share a lot in common and it's easy enough for a GM to transfer an adventure, monster, or other game element from one retroclone to their preferred choice.

A Comprehensive List of Dungeons & Dragons retroclones can be found here



The self-described Rosetta Stone of Old-School Fantasy Role-Playing Games, Labyrinth Lord is an OGL version of 1982 Basic D&D.  It has the most 3rd party support of old school retroclones, and is available in a free no-art version for download.  Also available in an "Advanced Edition Compendium" for 1st Edition AD&D fans.



Dark Dungeons is a straightforward and faithful retroclone of the BECMI version of Dungeons & Dragons.  The title's a reference to the infamous 1980s Jack Chick comic strip.



Lamentations of the Flame Princess is a modified version of Basic D&D for a more horrific Weird Fantasy vibe.  Combat is far more dangerous, magic is the domain of madmen trafficking with otherworldly entities, and all monsters are rare creatures not understood or known by man.  The majority of experience is earned through obtaining treasure and not combat, and combat is indeed very dangerous.  Available in a free no-art version on Drive-Thru RPG and RPGNow.



Swords & Wizardry is based off of the Original version of Dungeons & Dragons, all the way back in 1974.  Is a more streamlined and straightforward version, with emphasis on minimalist elements of play to encourage creativity and customization.  As of a successful Kickstarter it is now free to the public.  Link here.



Adventurer Conqueror King System is much like any straightforward fantasy RPG, except that the PCs gain increased power and influence as they gain levels.  Characters returning from a successful adventure are encouraged to use their wealth and fame to establish ties in the local community, and there is a well-designed and in-depth system to support domain building.  In addition to ruling regions and baronies, PCs gain specific political benefits: thieves can run their own guilds, mages can build their own dungeons and breed magical monsters, et cetera.  Additionally, it's the most balanced retroclone in terms of classes.  Martial classes such as the fighter can cleave through hordes of enemies, while some of the more world-altering spells are toned down.



Dungeon Crawl Classics uses its own rules system, and emulates the super-lethal early years of D&D along with some weird fantasy elements (think Lovecraft mixed with Conan).  Players generate multiple level 0 characters at once in a process known as the "character creation funnel," and those lucky enough to survive the first adventure become the PCs!  Each class has its own special ability: fighters can pull of awesome stunts with the Mighty Deed of Arms, Thieves gain a Luck die to pull them out of tight spots, Clerics can beseech their deity for favors, and Magic-Users can overload on spell energy for short-term gain, long-term pain!



Beyond the Wall and Other Adventures is inspired by the works of Ursula K. LeGuin and Lloyd Alexander, where the heroes are coming-of-age adolescents who venture beyond the safety of their village on their first big journey.



Scarlet Heroes is a retroclone which takes place in the Red Tide setting, inspired by fantasy elements of Southeast Asia.  The ruleset is designed for 1 Dungeon Master and one Player Character in mind.

Helpful Links

Grey Six Retroclones List: By far the most comprehensive list of old school retroclones I've found on the Internet.

Swords & Wizardry SRD: Online database of game mechanics from the aforementioned retroclone.

The Grand OGL Wiki [Labyrinth Lord]: All of the Open Gaming Content from the Labyrinth Lord Retroclone.

Quick Primer for Old School Gaming: A mini-booklet written for the more modern breed of tabletop gamer as an introduction into the play style of old-school games.

Drive-Thru RPG's OSR Section: The largest webstore for RPG downloads has its own section for retroclones and their supplements.

Sine Nomine Publishing: A very good game designer, Kevin Crawford's responsible for some of the most original and best-selling content for old-school games.  He created the Spears of the Dawn RPG, which draws upon elements of fantasy Africa (the authentic well-researched kind, not the old-timey stereotypes); the Red Tide Campaign Setting, an Asian-themed sandbox setting for Labyrinth Lord; and Stars Without Number, a space opera game.

Sine Nomine's currently working on the Scarlet Heroes RPG, specifically designed for 1 player, 1 Dungeon Master.  Sounds perfect for Elliquiy! :-)

Community Websites and Blogs

OSR Today: The OSR's news outlet.

Dragonsfoot: The largest fan community of 1st Edition AD&D, the Dragonsfoot forums also have a lively discussion of retroclone games.

Original D&D Discussion: Dedicated to the first version of D&D, as well as other popular 1970s table-top games.  Have a retroclone subforum, too!

Tenkar's Tavern: A blog which keeps up with news and events in the OSR community.  Notable for being a watchdog of sorts on old-school-themed Kickstarter projects.

Bat in the Attic: Good network and collection of other OSR sites and blogs, in a survey here.

Grognardia: A now-defunct blog, James Maliszewski wrote a lot of historical articles of D&D products and news from the 70s and 80s.  People recommend starting with his oldest entries first.

Jeff's Gameblog: An infrequently updated yet must-read blog, Jeff Rients has no shortage of entertaining articles.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2014, 06:02:17 PM by Skynet »

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2014, 03:31:24 AM »
I still find it funny that for something that calls itself 'Old School' it's nothing of the sort, past the trappings.  A lot of the time, those who claim to play it, are viewing the late seventies and early eighties as this mythical 'golden age' and it was nothing of the sort.  Most of these games, like Labyrinth Lord for example, updates old classics with the despised 'modern' gaming ideas, and no one bats an eye.

Funny stuff.

But still, ignoring the silliness that the OSR is trying to get people to believe, some of these are great games, and I recommend trying each and everyone one of them out some day.

Offline Ebb

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2014, 08:04:39 AM »
Very helpful summary, Skynet. There were some of these that I'd only heard the title of, so having some description to attach is very nice.

Having played a couple of these and read more, I think there definitely is a distinct common feel that separates them from more modern games. The "Quick Primer for Old School Gaming" that Skynet linked sums up the differences better than I ever could. I wouldn't say it's better or worse than more modern games, but it aims for a different target at least.


Offline Fabjuth

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2014, 10:15:59 AM »
Thank you very much Skynet! As someone who's only been roleplaying for about a year, and keeps hearing in various places about how great some of the older versions of games were, this gives me some useful places to look to get a feel for those systems with a more contemporary setup. You mentioned doing similar sorts of posts for WoD, Eclipse Phase, and Pathfinder, have you considered doing some for the independent RPG's that are coming out these days (I'm thinking Monte Cook's Cypher system games, Fiasco, and the like)?

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2014, 11:23:58 PM »
I don't own Numenera, and while I do own a few indie games I haven't delved deeply enough into them in order to do a detailed write-up.

Supplements

Although not complete games in their own right, I found some sourcebooks very helpful, and would recommend to newcomers and experienced old-school players alike.  Click the picture to be taken to a more informational page.



Vornheim: The Complete City Kit is a system-neutral sourcebook for building fantasy cities, as well as a compilation of notes from the author's personal games of several years.  In addition to inspirational material from his home setting and advice for city-based campaigns, there's many lists of charts and tables for quick generation of taverns, nobles, rumors, games, and other such things for DMs with little prep time.



The Teratic Tome is a Pay What You Want monster manual with an emphasis on the creepy, malign, and the grotesque.  Uses the 1st Edition AD&D rules.



Available for Labyrinth Lord and compatible with similarly-structured old school games, Black Streams: Solo Heroes is a series of simple rules to make one-on-one gaming more fun and survivable.  Example rules include the Fray Die which allows a PC to fell multiple opponents with a single attack roll, the ability to escape certain death when they'd otherwise die, the ability to restore wounds with quick binding between battles as an additional healing resource, and more.  I'd be willing to try this out with any interested gamers on E. :-)

This product's also the basis for the publisher's upcoming RPG, Scarlet Heroes.



Red Tide: Campaign Sourcebook and Sandbox Toolkit is a Labyrinth Lord product and one of the best old school products out there IMO.  It is a full-fledged setting drawing upon elements of Southeast Asia, where the last remnants of civilization have been pushed to the Sunset Isles by the insidious red tide.  Refugees of once-great kingdoms and empires share land with the xenophobic Shou tribes of the unexplored west, who view these newcomers as invaders.  Also included are several pieces of information on running sandbox campaigns, along with new classes, spells, and magic items.


In case you're wondering about the covers, the last two are made by Sine Nomine Games.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2014, 01:29:37 PM by Skynet »

Offline Zekromnomnom

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2014, 01:38:07 AM »
My Pathfinder GM always used to go on and on about Labyrinth Lord. He had a "mentor" in college who was really into the old school games and this gave the PF GM the idea that he really knew his shit and made him entitled to tell me what D&D "is all about", despite my 10+ years of playing 3.X. I know it's a bit different, but I'm pretty sure my friend never really even played the older ones.

Sorry, I just found the friend in question to be annoying. Anyway, something to actually contribute to the thread, I think this is a really neat idea for a thread. And I'm definitely interested in taking a look at some of these when I have free time. I would love to try my hand at game designing in this sense, but I would really have no idea where to begin.

But still, this is a nice, well put together thread. Thanks for starting it, Skynet.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2014, 01:19:27 PM »
Added Dark Dungeons to the RPG list, and Teratic Tome to the supplement list.

In case the list grows over time, should I split up the straight clones from the ones which take significant departures.  I mean, Labyrinth Lord's a lot closer rules-wise to the Basic D&D rules that Lamentations of the Flame Princess.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2014, 01:29:58 PM by Skynet »

Offline MasterMischief

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2014, 10:38:06 PM »
'Old School' just never appealed to me.  I guess I am a progressive in more ways than one.   O8)  I think table top role playing games in general have improved.  I am glad to see many of the 'sacred cows' sacrificed.  If there is a good reason for something, then, by all means keep it.  If something is kept simply for tradition or nostalgia...well...that is not a good enough reason for me.  As Chris pointed out, a lot of these 'Old School' games have embraced nouveau concepts.

Offline Dhi

I didn't realize some of the retro clones were BECMI rather than OD&D. That's really cool. I have the old Mystara, Thunder Bluff, Hollow World, and Red Steel stuff on my shelf, and I've talked to my group about going BECMI after our current campaign rather than adopting the 5E rules.

Dark Dungeons sounds like something I should check out. All I know about Lamentations is the infamy of some of its art depicting the graphic deaths of women. I consider Basic to fall within the fold of BECMI, so I'm curious why the distinction is made. Do Lamentations and Labyrinth Lord differ so significantly from the Expert, Companion, Master and Immortal rules that they only share Basic in common with BECMI?

Offline RedPhoenix



Lamentations of the Flame Princess is a modified version of Basic D&D for a more horrific Weird Fantasy vibe.  Combat is far more dangerous, magic is the domain of madmen trafficking with otherworldly entities, and all monsters are rare creatures not understood or known by man.  The majority of experience is earned through obtaining treasure and not combat, and combat is indeed very dangerous.  Available in a free no-art version on Drive-Thru RPG and RPGNow.



Adventurer Conqueror King System is much like any straightforward fantasy RPG, except that the PCs gain increased power and influence as they gain levels.  Characters returning from a successful adventure are encouraged to use their wealth and fame to establish ties in the local community, and there is a well-designed and in-depth system to support domain building.  In addition to ruling regions and baronies, PCs gain specific political benefits: thieves can run their own guilds, mages can build their own dungeons and breed magical monsters, et cetera.  Additionally, it's the most balanced retroclone in terms of classes.  Martial classes such as the fighter can cleave through hordes of enemies, while some of the more world-altering spells are toned down.

I'd never heard of either of these two and I really like the ideas behind them. I always liked the whole start from nothing and build up your legacy approach to RPGs. :)

Offline Dhi

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2014, 04:37:50 PM »
Looking over Dark Dungeons and reading some of the discussion on Piazza, the author does not seem to be willing to concede that the changes to the elf class make it vastly better, at a reduction of its original cost, and that might be a bad thing for what was already one of the most popular classes in the game.

I could not find any adventures made for Dark Dungeons. To use the system at all I would need to adapt BECMI adventures from a system I do like to one that I don't agree with in some major areas. I feel as though the major strength of a retro clone is in opening the door for third party support, but after 4 years, the BECMI community does not seem to have adopted it.

So Dark Dungeons is not the retro clone for me. I guess I will also check out Labyrinth Lord and Lamentations, and Red Tide sounds like something I'd enjoy (even though I already have a setting in mind).

Offline Blythe

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2014, 12:08:05 AM »


Adventurer Conqueror King System is much like any straightforward fantasy RPG, except that the PCs gain increased power and influence as they gain levels.  Characters returning from a successful adventure are encouraged to use their wealth and fame to establish ties in the local community, and there is a well-designed and in-depth system to support domain building.  In addition to ruling regions and baronies, PCs gain specific political benefits: thieves can run their own guilds, mages can build their own dungeons and breed magical monsters, et cetera.  Additionally, it's the most balanced retroclone in terms of classes.  Martial classes such as the fighter can cleave through hordes of enemies, while some of the more world-altering spells are toned down.

I've played a bit of Lamentations; it wasn't too bad.

But ooh, Adventurer Conqueror King sounds right up my alley. Domain building? Martial classes that have some balance and toned down world-breaking spells? Yes, please. I might have to throw some money at this; I like the idea of this game.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2014, 08:06:09 PM »
Autarch had a deal where if you bought the physical book from affiliated FLGS stores, then you got the PDF for free.  Or if you bought the PDF, you can buy the book at reduced price.

I don't know if they still have that, though.

Offline roleplayinggrl18

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2014, 01:09:03 PM »
I personally really like what I have read of Adventurer Conqueror King.  From reading it, it seems to be fairly standard adventuring in the early levels building up to you establishing a power base and eventually ruling a kingdom. 

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2014, 06:38:12 PM »
Scarlet Heroes is now for sale on Drive-Thru RPG.

Unfortunately it has adult content and its page cannot be accessed unless you're a DTRPG member.  I just bought the book and am looking through it.  I'll post my thoughts later.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2014, 06:09:04 PM »
Was looking at it, but the question is:  Is it 'OSR'?  Or just another game?

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2014, 01:03:02 AM »
It derives influence from old-school D&D editions and retroclones, but it incorporates a lot of new ground and rules.  It still follows the classic four classes and races (fighter/cleric/thief/magic-user and human/dwarf/elf/halfling), but it incorporates a series of rules to make PCs veritable powerhouses even at low levels.  Every class has a Fray die, where they deal automatic damage to equal and lower-level enemies every round in combat to represent a "one-man army."  Every PC also spends points on traits, which is a lot like the skill systems of later editions and backgrounds from 13th Age.  PCs take a lot less damage, while monsters are easy to drop in comparison to other RPGs.

The game can be played on its own, but it has enough similarities to other retroclones to run old-school adventures of other games with one DM and one PC.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2014, 04:23:20 AM »
So is it worth the 15 bucks for the PDF?  In your opinion.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2014, 12:20:43 PM »
Yes, very much so.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2014, 08:06:52 PM »
Once I have the money I'll consider it.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2014, 11:57:17 PM »
So I went and read the Quick Primer once again, and I sort of have mixed feelings about its presentation.  Its premise is that "you won't understand until you play it," which is true to an extent.  But it presents these distinctions as "zen moments" which imply a spontaneous "eureka!" moment that comes to you.

I feel that this kind of defeats the point of trying to explain New/Old school difference, not to mention that some of the examples of differences aren't the case for many OSR games (there's a "find traps" roll in Labyrinth Lord and Lamentations of the Flame Princess, whereas the Old School Primer says that gamers have to rely upon "player skill" instead of die rolls in old-school games).  Not to mention that the rules-lite minimalist aspect it portrays old-school games as isn't always applicable to certain Editions and retroclones.  Take a look at 1st Edition AD&D and its attack matrices or Dungeon Crawl Classic's spellcasting system, for example.

Those are small apples, though.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 12:00:09 AM by Skynet »

Offline Dhi

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2014, 07:00:07 AM »
Is that the attitude of it? That old school is a better system and makes more sense? ???

Surely we're mature enough to admit that the first scratchings on cave walls of fantasy roleplaying are not a superior system, and that tabletop games as a whole are no longer suited to provide an outlet for rules mastery. MMOs provide more tangible and social benefits for rules mastery than tabletop games could ever hope to compete with. I have helped more than a dozen people get into the tabletop hobby, and what they want is not a better system that makes more sense. What they want is an outlet for expressing their imagination. A social experience. A low barrier of entry. Really the same thing I think most of us want out of E, the same thing people the world over want.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2014, 12:29:03 PM »
Is that the attitude of it? That old school is a better system and makes more sense? ???

Yeah, that's sort of what it's implying.

Quote
Surely we're mature enough to admit that the first scratchings on cave walls of fantasy roleplaying are not a superior system, and that tabletop games as a whole are no longer suited to provide an outlet for rules mastery. MMOs provide more tangible and social benefits for rules mastery than tabletop games could ever hope to compete with. I have helped more than a dozen people get into the tabletop hobby, and what they want is not a better system that makes more sense. What they want is an outlet for expressing their imagination. A social experience. A low barrier of entry. Really the same thing I think most of us want out of E, the same thing people the world over want.

Many in the OSR look down on "rules mastery" a lot, and it's part of why many of them shirked away from 3rd and 4th Edition.  They view the rules-heavy systems and many supplements as fostering an atmosphere which encourages focusing on character abilities and game mechanics, whereas they view pre-3rd D&D as a better avenue for imagination and role-playing.  I overall disagree; the high lethality of certain OSR retroclones makes it hard to stay attached to your PC, for example, which can discourage role-playing.

I guess my main problem with the Primer was that it presented old-school gaming in a rather monolithic bloc and playstyle, which is not the case.

Since it's free, and I don't want to misrepresent it, I'll post a Google Docs link to it here.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 12:35:23 PM by Skynet »

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2014, 12:31:37 PM »
Aaaand this is where is I unleash the beast and cut loose with a bit of a rant.

First a bit of background.  I'm a 'Third Gen' roleplayer, I played a bit of AD&D 1e, but really got my teeth cut in 2e.  And let me tell you 'Rules Mastery' as part of Old School never existed.  It was 'make $#!% up as you go, have fun!'  There was, admittedly, a lot of reliance on player (not character) ingenuity, yes, but definitely not 'system/rules mastery'.  The pre-AD&D games also had a bit of a reasonably friendly cutthroat/competition which tapered off during the Advanced era.

Rules, or more accurately, System Mastery was a 3.0 thing.  Not 3.5, they pulled back from that in that version, much to Monte Cook's eternal chagrin.  Between Mr. Cook's love of Magic: The Gathering and D&D 'vancian' (which is an incorrect use of the term) Magic, 3rd Ed was full of little things that need the astute player to catch and understand and know what to use and avoid.  For example, there were a lot of little traps, that would make you ineffective in combat challenges is you used the rules as written (which admittedly a lot of people never did.  Most of them have this romantic view of 3e and love Pathfinder as a result), things like the Fighter class' reliance of feats, and the feats themselves.  A lot of feats were traps, things that looked good at the start, but were terrible in the long run, namely any Feat that did not scale with your level (Things like Toughness, or Lightning Reflexes, which gave one time bonuses, unlike Power Attack or Expertise, which did increase per level and thus were the ones you wanted.  But then even the Fighter class was a Trap.)  Don't believe me?  Read his introduction of his massive $120 flop, Ptolus where he extols the virtues of a player who accepted the oddity of magic as opposed to the one who freaked out during his test campaign.  Or look up some of the essays he wrote about his 3.0 designer days

This constant whining about how it was 'so much better back in the day' is more of people's fond remembrance for heavily modified and house-ruled version of their favourite editions that they played oh so long ago back in their youth.  Now wanting to recapture, or emulate such experiences is fine, it's great.  And the fact that these visions of these experiences are coming of talented and dedicated hobbyist designers is AWESOME!  I love it.  But 'Old School' it's not and I really wish people would let it go calling it that.  It creates camps, cliques and tribes, which fosters hostility within the hobby.

Yes, I get it, it fosters an 'Us vs. Them' mentality that a lot of us older geeks remember back in our youth, back when being a nerd/geek was the social club that every other 'popular' club shoved the unwanted into.  I get it, I was there, I was one.  But it's time to realize that gaming is both a life long and sharing experience.  Best done with friends, no matter what their tastes are.  It's here to be done in a group.

Sorry, I needed to get that out.  I apologize.

Offline Dovel

Re: This thread is about the Old School Renaissance (D&D retroclones) (WIP)
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2014, 05:43:09 PM »
Wow, thanks Skynet for all the great info and links!

2nd Edition D&D is still my favorite system. There were so many wonderful settings and modules released during that time period. We used to run a 2nd Edition game out of our home, but after 3rd Edition came around it kind of fell apart.

I still grab up old 2nd Edition modules when I can. Ravenloft & Dark Sun being two of my favorites.