You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 09, 2016, 03:33:41 PM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!  (Read 12470 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« on: October 15, 2013, 06:24:38 PM »
Pathfinder Role-Playing Game


The Pathfinder Role-Playing Game is a retro-clone of 3rd Edition Dungeons & Dragons.  Way back around 2008, Paizo Publishing released Rise of the Runelords in their own unique setting of Golarion and was met with critical acclaim.  The following year brought about several more adventure paths and coincided with the release of 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons.

There was still a large contingent of 3rd Edition fans, including Paizo Publishing, who set to work on a new and revised version in 2008.  Drawing upon elements of their own setting, it was dubbed the Pathfinder Role-Playing Game.  The company drew a lot of attention around this year for their public playtest, where people can sign up on their message boards and offer advice and criticism on their developments.

Sometime during late 2009, the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook was released.  The 3rd Edition fanbase was still strong, competing with the new 4th Edition in fanbase and sales.  Paizo Publishing was right when they said that 3rd Edition not only survived, it thrived.

Tell Me About the Game Mechanics!


The Pathfinder Role-Playing Game is basically an updated 3rd Edition.  It makes several changes in the rules, namely increased hit die for classes across the board, consolidated and simplified skill system, the nerfing of a few overpowered spells and classes, boosts and changes to the core race, and similar changes.  Overall the system does quite a bit to increase the viability of underpowered concepts, but the designers missed a few problem spells and have an ax to grind against the Monk class, so their efforts haven't been entirely successful.

For those new to the D20 System, Pathfinder is a D&D-esque RPG with a class and level system built around a D20 framework.  Most tasks in the game are accomplished with rolling a twenty-sided die with modifiers against a target number, or Dice Challenge.  Other forms of dice are used as well, most notably for rolling for damage with successful attacks and hit points gained from level ups.

While it's not required, the generic form of session involves a party of adventurers exploring dangerous and foreboding locations in search of gold and treasure.  Player character wealth and equipment is very important in Pathfinder (as it is in D&D), necessary for buying better equipment to stand against stronger adversaries.  Player characters also progress in levels (representing power) through experience points, most commonly gained by slaying monsters and other evil folk.

Nonetheless, Pathfinder can support a broad range of games beyond dungeon-delving, although the system's rather combat-heavy and centric.  Your party can be crusaders against a demonic invasion, part of a thieves' guild robbing well-guarded homes of nobility, traveling monster-hunters, and other popular fantasy archetypes.

The Pathfinder SRD can be found here.

Tell Me About the Setting!

Pathfinder is set in the world of Golarion, a planet which orbits the sun in the far reaches of the Material Plane.  It contains eight continents, two of which are the crux of the setting, Garund and Avistan.  Avistan is a large peninsula whose civilizations are built on the backs of past empires, while Garund is a mostly unexplored southern continent of warmer climates.

The continents are part of the Inner Sea region, and are a Fantasy Kitchen Sink of sorts.  The Inner Sea is home to all sorts of nations with their own theme and feel: Galt is a Renaissance-era mirror of post-Revolutionary France, their aristocracy overthrown and now ruled by increasingly violent populists; Varisia is a frontier region and adventurer's paradise, home to countless dungeons and monstrous lairs; Cheliax is a tyrannical, expansionist empire, ruled by the Church of Asmodeus, Lord of Hell, and his fiendish servants; the cosmopolitan island city-state of Absalom is the greatest of its kind and the center of human culture; Taldor is a crumbling empire fallen to decadence; while the Worldwound, a rift in reality, spits out demonic hordes to ravage nearby lands.

One of the principal organizations from which the RPG gets its name is the Pathfinder Society.  They are a multi-national organization of scholarly adventurers who seek knowledge all over Golarion.  Their headquarters is in the city-state of Absalom, and they have lodges scattered across the Inner Sea region.  They have been responsible for the advancement of knowledge, from the discovery of the Drow to the recollection of the Shattered Star artifact.  They regularly publish a series of journals known as the Pathfinder Chronicles, a series of books discussing the mysteries of the world.  It is not necessary for the PCs to be part of this organization, but they're an iconic group in the setting.

The Pathfinder Wiki can be found here.

Tell Me About the Adventure Paths

Even before the creation of Pathfinder, Paizo was critically acclaimed for its Adventure Paths, linked series of adventures which comprised the majority of a typical campaign.  And today is no different.  As of this posting Paizo published around 10 Adventure Paths for Pathfinder of varying quality.  The most critically acclaimed include Kingmaker, where the PCs set out to found their own nation, and the original Rise of The Runelords, where the PCs set out to learn more about the aforementioned runelords through dungeon delving in Varisia.

A list of adventure paths can be found here, but just in case the link does not work...

Rise of the Runelords: An ancient evil stirs to life in the frontier nation of Varisia.  A classic dungeon crawl type of campaign with a macabre feel: the PCs will delve into ruins of monsters powered by sin, stop a serial killer in his tracks, assault the lair of a tribe of inbred sadist ogres, and explore vast reaches of inhospitable wilderness.

Curse of the Crimson Throne: An urban-based campaign in the city of Korvosa.  The PCs must deal with social unrest, as the King is dead and the Queen is a suspect.  To save the city the players must deal with plague outbreaks, the rise of criminal factions, and a tyrant Queen intent on seizing the throne!

Second Darkness: A strange shadow spreads above the city of Riddleport, and the drow of the Darklands are responsible!  The PCs must stop them if they are to avert the end of the world!

Legacy of Fire: An Arabian Nights-inspired adventure path, where the armies of two mighty genie lords rise again and threaten to engulf Golarion in strife.

Council of Thieves: A gritty urban adventure of organized crime and devilish scheming set in the Chelish capital of Westcrown.

Kingmaker: Widely considered to be the best Adventure Path of the lot, Kingmaker is where the PCs set out into the Stolen Lands and found their own nation.  Includes lots of support for community-building and other kingly duties.

Serpent's Skull: A dungeon-crawling with pulp tropes of dangerous jungles, long-ruined cities, and monstrous reptile men!

Carrion Crown: A Gothic fantasy themed series of adventures set in the horrific land of Ustalav.

Jade Regent: The PCs are hired by a passing caravan to venture to the far-away lands of the Dragon Empires to overthrew the tyrannical Jade Regent.  Contains themes of fantasy China and other Asian countries.

Skulls & Shackles: A pirate-themed campaign where the PCs make a name for themselves as swashbucklers among the pirate island chain of the Shackles.

Shattered Star: The spiritual sequel to Rise of the Runelords, the PCs working for the Pathfinder Society set out to recover 6 pieces of the Shattered Star.  An ancient artifact once owned by the Emperor of Thassilon, fragments are resurfacing across the lands, and they must be reunited if the PCs hope to avert a great danger from the distant past!

Reign of Winter: Baba Yaga has regularly returned to snowy Irresen to elect its newest ruler, yet when she fails to appear in that frozen realm pockets of winter start springing up all over the Inner Sea region.  If she is not stopped soon, eternal winter will engulf the world!

Wrath of the Righteous: The current Adventure Path, WotR focuses on the PCs being righteous holy crusaders against the demonic forces of the Worldwound, a giant tear in reality spreading outward to other lands.  Notable for containing one of the first known portrayals of transgender characters in D&D.

I've Heard Enough, Where Do I Start?

Intrigued?  Now that I see I whet your appetite, here are some products I'd recommend for starting out.

The Pathfinder Beginner Box is the perfect first step for your gaming group into the game, especially if you've never played 3rd Edition.  It's simplified system was so popular that even experienced players used it as a skimmed-down rules-lite variant.

If you can't spare a dime, I'd recommend looking over the rules in the Pathfinder SRD.  All of the game mechanics from the Core Rulebook are up there, meaning you can totally use the website in conjunction with Play-by-Post and Roll20 gaming sessions.

If you prefer a physical book in your hands, the Core Rulebook should be your first product after the Beginner Box (or first product period if you're a 3rd Edition veteran).  It contains all the rules players need.

For Dungeon Masters, the Bestiary is Pathfinder's Monster Manual.  Goblins, Dragons, Demons, and more are at a conniving DM's fingertips in this tome.

The Advanced Player's Guide is one of the most popular sourcebooks for its wealth of great material.  I highly recommend buying it, as it contains some of the most popular options and archetypes among Pathfinder players.

Pathfinder Goblins


Goblins chew and goblins bite,
Goblins cut and goblins fight,
Stab the dog and cut the horse,
Goblins eat and take by force!

Goblins race and goblins jump,
Goblins slash and goblins bump,
Burn the skin and mash the head,
Goblins here and you be dead!

Chase the baby, catch the pup,
Bonk the head to shut it up!
Bones be cracked, flesh be stewed,
We the goblins—you the food!


Pathfinder reinvented the goblin race in the Rise of the Runelords Adventure Path in favor of something more creatively demented.  Now the setting's monstrous mascot, goblins are a perfect balance between funny and scary.  Their voracious sadism and wickedly jagged blades, combined with their silly songs and crazy superstitions.

10 Fun Facts About Goblins
1: Horse Hate: Goblins excel at riding animals, but they don't quite get horses. In fact, their hatred of all things horse is matched only by their fear of horses, who tend to step on goblins who get too close.

2: Dog Hate: Although goblins raise horrible rat-faced doglike creatures to use as mounts (and ride wolves or worgs if they can get them—goblins are quick to explain that wolves are NOT dogs), their hatred of ordinary dogs nearly matches their hatred of horses. The feeling is mutual, so if your dog's barking at the woodpile for no reason, chances are good he smells a frightened goblin hiding in there somewhere.

3: Goblins Raid Junkyards: Garbage pits, gutters, sewers… anywhere there's garbage, you can bet goblins are nearby. They're weirdly adept at crafting weapons and armor from refuse, and are fond of killing people with what they throw away.

4: Goblins Love to Sing: Unfortunately, as catchy as their lyrics can be, goblin songs tend to be a bit too creepy and disturbing to catch on in mainstream society.

5: They're Sneaky: An excited or angry goblin is a noisy, chattering, toothy menace, but even then, they can drop into an unsettling silence in a heartbeat. This, matched with their diminutive size, makes them unnervingly adept at hiding in places you'd never expect… stacks of firewood, rain barrels, under logs, under chicken coops, in ovens, etc.

6: They're A Little Crazy: The fact that goblins think of things like ovens as good hiding places reveals much about their inability to think plans through to the most likely outcome. That, and they tend to be easily distracted, particularly by shiny things and animals smaller than them that might make good eating.

7: They're Voracious: Given enough supplies, a goblin generally takes nearly a dozen meals a day. Most goblin tribes don't have enough supplies to accommodate such ravenous appetites, which is why the little menaces are so prone to going on raids.

8: They Like Fire: Burning things is one of the great goblin pastimes, although they're generally pretty careful about lighting fires in their own lairs, especially since goblins tend to live in large tangled thistle patches and sleep in beds of dried leaves and grass. But give a goblin a torch and someone else's home and you've got trouble.

9: They Get Stuck Easily: Goblins have wiry frames but wide heads, and live in cramped warrens. Sometimes too cramped.

10: Goblins Believe Paintings and Writing Steal Your Soul: The walls of goblin lairs and ruins of towns goblins have raided are littered with pictures of their enemies. They never draw pictures of goblins, though—that's mean. Writing steals words out of your head. You can't get them back.

Tell Me About Third-Party Support


Pathfinder utilizes the Open Gaming License, meaning that it's the new 3.X flagship for smaller developers.  Like the WotC days of 3rd Edition, there's a massive assortment of Pathfinder-compatible products, ranging from the horrible to the terrific.  Naturally I'll be outlining the best of the best here.

Psionics Unleashed: By the esteemed Dreamscarred Press, Psionics Unleashed is a faithful adaption of the 3rd Edition Psionics rules.  Critically acclaimed for making the Soulknife a viable PC concept with a much-needed power boost.

Path of War: Another Dreamscarred Press book, this series of supplements implements the martial maneuver systems from 3rd Edition's Tome of Battle for more cinematic and mobile martial characters.  Currently available as a subscription, where you can get every new release for $15.  The two products currently available are the Stalker class and Warlord class, along with their schools of disciplines.

Cerulean Seas Campaign Setting: By Alluria Publishing.  A beautiful book set in an undersea realm.  99% of the world is covered in water, allowing the aquatic races to predominate.  Is the best sourcebook regarding rules for underwater adventures and combat for the D20 System, bar none.  Cerulean Seas also does a great job of re-configuring existing things in Pathfinder to work underwater, from fire spells generating hot steam to alternate equipment made from undersea creatures and materials (coral armor, holy water is now holy sand, a thick oily liquid heavier than water serves as the basis for alchemical solutions, etc).

Midgard Campaign Setting: A dark fantasy campaign setting which heavily draws upon Central and Eastern European folktales.  Notable for its pantheon of deities wearing many disguises (Masks), the clockwork metropolis of Zobeck, a flat world surrounded by a titanic World-Serpent god, and the deadly courts of the Shadow Fey.

Way of the Wicked: The first and only evil adventure path for Pathfinder.  The PCs are condemned outcasts working for the cult of Asmodeus, seeking revenge against the virtuous island nation of Talingarde and to build a new diabolic order upon its ruins.

Throne of Night: Same creators as Way of the Wicked.  An Underdark sandbox adventure path where the PCs are either surface adventurers, honorable dwarves, or ruthless drow staking out a claim in the deep reaches.

Tome of Horrors Complete-Pathfinder Edition: A compilation of the 3 original Tomes for the Pathfinder RPG, full of hundreds of monsters from old school Edition of Dungeons & Dragons.

On a related note, publishers with consistently high production quality include Frog God Games, Kobold Press/Open Design, and Dreamscarred Press.

Work In Progess
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 03:21:28 PM by Skynet »

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 07:35:25 PM »
Tell me about the Pathfinder Society (PFS)

The Pathfinder Society is an organized campaign setup and adminstrated by the folks at Paizo. I'm putting this up as favor for Skynet since I'm a Venture Officer (VO). What does that mean? I'm a coordinator for the area I live in. I advise folks who want to play PFS, offer materials and information and network with the FLGS (Friendly Local Game Stores) to keep them up to date on upcoming items and such.

What the PFS entails is a coordinated seasonal campaign set in Paizo's home setting of Golorian. The players are members of the Pathfinder society. They are explorers, adventurers and scholars who are trying to recover the lost fragments of the world's history. There are rivals and enemies to the Society as a whole, and seasonal foes who pop up and menace the society and the world.

Paizo's Page on the PFS This is the gateway link to the world of the PFS. From here you can download the PFS organized play guide, the free downloads, chronicle sheets, information on how the material Paizo publishes is used in PFS play.

Explanation Time.

Okay here is the nutshell version of what you'll find in the Organized Play Guide.
-Characters are 20 point buy, 150 gp starting off with a modifed XP system (Real simple.. 3 xp earns you a level) Races: All core races, Aasimar, Tengu and Teiflings are legal for everyone to play. Other races require a boon.
-Scenarios typicaly earn a player 1 Xp, and 0-2 prestige points, Modules earn you 3 Xp and 4 Prestige (As do AP Books)
-A scenario is designed for 4 to 5 hours of play and has a 'range' of play. Typically these are Level 1, 1-5, 3-7, 5-9, and 7-11.
-Each Character is part of a faction and earning prestige with their faction lets them have a higher purchasing power. For example, my 11th Admixture Wizard is a member of the Osirion Faction and has earned 58 Fame (total earned Prestige in her career) which translates into the ability to buy anything of 98,500 gp or less (provided she had the coin.. I have 5k on her). There are some exceptions to this rule.

Explantions:
-Chronicle Sheets: You get one of these for each event you finish, be it an AP, Special, Scenario or Module. You get an XP award, Prestige, Cash and a list of items/boons based on your tier. You also record/track conditions, expenditures, and such as you go on.
-Fame/Prestige. You earn Prestige by doing missions. There is a primary mission and secondary conditions. Secondary conditions are either a general one (for example.. 'Do the mission without revealing the Society was involved) or Faction Specific (Find out about potential trade connections in Merkev for the faction leader). The difference between Fame and Prestige. Fame is the total earned over a career with a faction, Prestige is your current count. These can vary as you can spend Prestige for specific faction vanities, general vanities or services. Examples: A town house in Abaslon (15pp) which gives the player a +2 Know (Local) in one district of Absalon, A Taldor Title (5 PP, Taldor), gives you a title and specialization in Knowledge (Nobles) or you can spend it on spells (16 PP for a Raise Dead, very helpful).
-Factions: There are currently Eight factions in the society. Each has goals/aims in general and season specific. (For example, after the events of last season, Osirion has lost the sponsorship of the Ruby Prince and are currently looking into the rumors of the 'Gem sages' which the faction leader is one of)
-Events: You can do a PFS event in your home with your group. Download a chronicle sheet for a module you own, buy a scenario, get one from your friendly local VO (like me!) or participate at an event at a game store, restaurant, or convention. You bring your character, your chronicle sheets to show where he/she has been.
-Boons. These can come from a variety of sources. You have chronicle sheets with a variety of 'Boons' on them. It could be a one time (or more) boon that lets you add a bonus to a roll of a skill, combat related roll, a +4 to your effect fame for buying specific items, a free 1,500/3,000 single purchase, or so on. Some are continuous, some are one shots, some open up otherwise illegal options (like a Faerie dragon as a familiar, or a non-standard race).
-GM Credit: Okay.. this is where it gets tricky. You can get credit for a scenario/module/whatever TWICE. Once as a player and once as a GM. After that it gets involved. You get credit to a character for GMing an event. So you can apply credit to a character you want to play at a later date. You also earn 'letters' of credit for each event you GM. I'm currently a '3 star' GM, which means I've done over 60 events of my own. Modules earn you 2 letters of credit btw. Some scenarios require you to be a 4-star, VO or Paizo staff member to play, these are called 'Exclusives' and are a 1 a year thing. They are always a blast. This years is 'Day of the Demon' where you investigate the newly bequeath home of a Society Ally to make sure its' safe despite it's unsavory past and discover events that lead directly to the season 5 villian (who I really really want to kill). The exclusive is always a more complicated event with an impact on the season to come (reporting the results can impact how things come out in the next season) and in the past we've had a faction leader die in one, hints to what the GenCon special would involve and more.

What do I need?

Basically all you need is the 'Core Assumption'.
-A PFS Membership number. (You get it online or at a game event). This is your member number, and each character is -1,-2, ect after that number for reporting.
-The Core Rule Book
-The Organize Play Guide (Updated one or two times a year, FREE download)
-Pathfinder Society Field Guide (think it was just replaced by the Society Primer)
-A Desire to play.

Anything else is purely optional. You have to have the resource of anything you are using. If you're playing a gunslinger, you have to have the Ultimate Combat book  (or a watermarked pdf of it with print outs of the relevant pages at a minimum)

Conventions: If you can get a PFS session with 15 tables (say a convention for example), you can get 'convention support' from Paizo via the PFS coordinator. This can be convention boons, which can give you Race boons, other boons (one I got was 'Treasure Maps'), and even books and novels (with the related pathfinder novel chronicle sheets for a PC) and other items.

Specials Specials are unique scenarios designed to be run on MULTIPLE tables at the same time. These are done at bigger game day events and conventions. Typically designed for being run from 5 tables to however many the coordiantors can handle. (GenCon specials number into the 150+ tables). They are designed to be played at a variety of levels, and thus the events will scale accordign to what you're playing at. A 1-2 table will face goblins right out of the Bestiary, whereas the guys playing the 15+ tier tables will face Goblins with multiple class levels, items and other goodies. Events at one table effect the whole, for example. Each time a particular big bad is beaten it's tallied and when a specific number is hit a NEW event occurs. If you complete your event, you might hop up and help a nearby table with theirs. (Jumping in can be fun when you're at the low tier table and 15th level wizard drops a fireball on your badguys or a cleric heals everyone just before they die). Specials, like exclusives, tend to be more challenging and have a larger impact on the upcoming season or at least set the stage for it.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 08:44:52 PM by Callie Del Noire »

Offline UllarWarlord

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2013, 09:06:26 PM »
Oh, hello. A Pathfinder thread.

Let me just take a second and say

WRATH OF THE RIGHTEOUS IS AN AWESOME ADVENTURE PATH.

Thank you.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2013, 11:21:43 PM »
In other news, Green Ronin and Owen KC Stephens joined up to produce Pathfinder material.  They're a stellar company, so you can expect to see some good things from them in the future!

I also inserted more information into my OP, including some discussion on the in-game Pathfinder Society (Freemason-like lodge of scholarly adventurers).
« Last Edit: October 21, 2013, 11:28:48 PM by Skynet »

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2013, 11:57:33 PM »
I think, and these are my thoughts, that the folks at Paizo have the right of it in supporting the community. Their open game license is very similar the original 3.0 version of the OGL that Wizards put out prior to their buyout by Hasbro. I don't think that Wizards has any of the open system supporters left on the staff and I know that the changes in the 4e GL agreements were to maintain exclusivity and ensure they maximized their market share.

Having heard from folks in the community I don't like some of the directions Wizards went with 4e and I definitely don't like the way they treat their talent and the community. (Layoffs between Thanksgiving and Xmas? Please..that's just mean)

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2013, 12:22:28 AM »
Deities of Golarion

Like any D&D setting, Pathfinder is no stranger to a pantheon of deities.  If you played 3rd Edition, deities function the same way mechanically in Pathfinder.  People worship them and visit their realms in the afterlife, but divine casters can receive spells from them.

Detailed below are the major deities of Pathfinder.  There are more not listed, but these ones play the largest role in the setting.

Aroden is the Lawful Neutral God of Humanity.  Now dead, he was an ascended mortal of the ancient Azlanti Empire who helped raise the Starstone and founded the City of Absalom.  The Empire of Taldor housed the greatest number of his faith in ancient times, and they spread westward to what is now western and southern Avistan.

Abadar is the Lawful Neutral God of Wealth, Cities, and Civilization.  He advocates the increased spread of industrialization and properly regulated commerce, advocating that this will the virtues of law and justice to the world.

Asmodeus is the Lawful Evil archdevil and ruler of Hell.  He and his minions encourage strict discipline and a hierarchal system of rulership.  His church dominates life in the Empire of Cheliax, where even the noble scions are influenced through infernal contracts.

Calistria is the Chaotic Neutral Goddess of lust and revenge with a predilection for whips.  She is very popular amongst elves, and her worshipers take on roles well-suited to their goddess' portfolios, from temple prostitutes to spies.

Cayden Cailean is a Chaotic Good ascended mortal of freedom, bravery, and alcoholic beverages.  His followers love living life to the fullest and fighting oppression in all its forms.

Desna is the Chaotic Good Goddess of travel, dreams, and luck.  She grants inspiration to the faithful who travel lonely roads and is favored by gamblers and halflings seeking her fortune.

Erastil is the Lawful Good god of harvest and the hunt.  Legends claim that he crafted the first bow to help humans in overcoming the challenges of the world, and his followers favor simple, rustic lives.

Gorum is the Chaotic Neutral god of war and iron, formed from battle itself in a mighty iron suit.

Gozreh is a fickle, multi-gendered (male and female avatars) dualistic Neutral deity of the storm and sky and wind and surf.  Mighty hurricanes and tidal waves are said to be Gozreh's wrath, and was one of the deities who fought against Rovagug in the defense of all creation.

Iomedae is the Lawful Good goddess of valor, justice and honor.  She served as Aroden's herald when he was a living god, and is popular among paladins, oppressed halflings in Cheliax, knights, and citizens of Lastwall.

Irori is the Lawful Neutral God of enlightenment, self-perfection, and inner strength.  Monks and all who seek self-improvement worship him.

Lamashtu is the Chaotic Evil goddess of deformed monsters and outcasts.  She is a very powerful demon, and has warred against every other deity at some point.  She does not have a formal church, instead preferring to contact faithful worshipers via madness and dark whispers.

Nethys is the Neutral God of magic, capable of seeing all things.  Duality and a shattered mind permeates his being; one part of him wishes to destroy the world, another part save it; his form is one half angular, dominant, and powerful, while the other half is charred and leaking magical energy.

Norborber is a Neutral Evil deity of thievery, assassination, and secrets.  His true form is unknown, and most are unaware of his plans.

Pharasma is the Neutral goddess of fate, prophecy, death, and rebirth.  She is responsible for shepherding Golarion's recently departed souls to to their respective afterlives.

Rovagug is an imprisoned Chaotic Evil deity who seeks only the destruction of reality.  A collection of gods opposed him when he first came in the earliest of ages.  Many died in battle, bu they managed to seal him away.  Asmodeus holds the key to his prison, which is believed to be deep beneath the earth.

Sarenrae is the Neutral Good goddess of the Sun, Redemption, Honesty, and Healing.  She teaches temperance and practice in all things, and her church is known for tending the crops, healing the sick, and reforming criminals and evildoers.

Shelyn is the Neutral Good deity of love, beauty, art, and and music.  She is the half-sister of Zon-Kuthon, and focuses just as much on "inner beauty," and inspires painters, musicians, sculptors, and others of a similar bent.

Torag is the Lawful Good Father of Dwarvenkind.  He encourages his followers in all forms of protection and creation, forging weapons and armor to defend their communities from the depredations of evil.

Urgathoa is the Neutral Evil Goddess of physical excess, disease, and the undead.  She is mostly worshiped by those studying undeath and/or seeking to become it, as well as gluttons of all varieties.  Her worshipers keep their faith secret, organizing into no more than small cells dedicated to spreading plague and death as much as they can.

Zon-Kuthon is a Lawful Evil insane god of pain and torture.  He was once a good deity, but after eons of exile in the dark spaces between the planes, something happened to him to make him who he is today.  He was responsible for the First Age of Darkness, when the sun stopped shining over Golarion, and his church is the state religion of Pangolais.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 01:27:46 AM »
I think, and these are my thoughts, that the folks at Paizo have the right of it in supporting the community. Their open game license is very similar the original 3.0 version of the OGL that Wizards put out prior to their buyout by Hasbro. I don't think that Wizards has any of the open system supporters left on the staff and I know that the changes in the 4e GL agreements were to maintain exclusivity and ensure they maximized their market share.

Having heard from folks in the community I don't like some of the directions Wizards went with 4e and I definitely don't like the way they treat their talent and the community. (Layoffs between Thanksgiving and Xmas? Please..that's just mean)
FYI, the OGL thing was something 'created' by Ryan Dancey, a well known figure in various gaming companies.  He no longer works at WoTC, but it was a WoTC initiative.  Also, you have no idea just how bad things were  during the latter end of the TSR days.  At least WoTC gave their employees notices of terminations.

And the OGL license has to be the same as the original 3.0 one, otherwise they're not using the D20 engine.  That's how the OGL was to be used.

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2013, 01:34:10 AM »
FYI, the OGL thing was something 'created' by Ryan Dancey, a well known figure in various gaming companies.  He no longer works at WoTC, but it was a WoTC initiative.  Also, you have no idea just how bad things were  during the latter end of the TSR days.  At least WoTC gave their employees notices of terminations.

And the OGL license has to be the same as the original 3.0 one, otherwise they're not using the D20 engine.  That's how the OGL was to be used.

Actually I do. I talked to folks who were there at the time.  Wizards had what? Three years of holiday purges in a row? Not because they HAD to do it but because they had finished the rush of product and decided to downsize.

What I meant was that Paizo seems more open to the whole open community concept than wizards is today, despite it being an element innovated and grew the game.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2013, 02:27:26 PM »
Either way, this isn't about the business practices of either.  Keep talking about the game, not the companies.

Because bashing any company, is just unprofessional and can turn people off.

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2013, 02:36:57 PM »
Either way, this isn't about the business practices of either.  Keep talking about the game, not the companies.

Because bashing any company, is just unprofessional and can turn people off.

I didn't realize I was.  Back to the game.

One of my opinions on a Paizo strength is there focus on content every year. It can be a good or bad thing depending on what you like.

This year, starting withe August release of the mythic set and the Worldwound AP, they did very good in showing a rules upgrade and immediately supporting it. No half measures. You literally get dropped into events that are world changing and emerge as heroic legends that must stop the demonic hordes threatening to over run the world. You got setting books, content on mythic powers, types, locations, more info on demons and a storyline on the PFS front that literally starts with you fighting on the front lines in the special @ Gencon.

I'm curious as to how they will do the next AP, which is set in Egypt-like osirion. 

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2013, 05:11:37 PM »
Can I ask about the Mythic stuff?  Do you have any info on that?

One of my personal gripes with 3.x are well documented, with the major one being the Magic system is pretty damn Mythic from the word go.  Magic Users (of both types) can level battlefields from as low as level 3.  And higher you get abilities like Talk to a God, or Stop Time (or more accurately, Time Stop) or summon asteroid showers and level small continents.  But the Non-Caster side, often just learns to hit better, and maybe harder.

And I've said this before, I don't want my Fighter/non-caster types to be able to summon a swarm of dragons, I don't want to manipulate time, when I get to play, I just want to be 'Beowulf', like the CG movie, where he took on, solo, a D&D styled troll (without the regen) and a Dragon (which did kill him, but still, pretty epic), still not quite into the realm of talking to divinities, but at least it's more epic than being able to hit more and more often.

So with all these gripes in mind, you two:  Sell me on Mythic Adventures, what can the non-casters do mechanically with the game system?

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2013, 05:40:14 PM »
What is Pathfinder Mythic Adventures About?

First off, Mythic adventures is NOT 20+ Epic 3.5 revamped. You can start out as an mythic character or close to it. The Worldwound AP has players achieve their first epic tier at the very END of the first adventure. There are all manners of mythic ties to the players in the Player's Guide and some of them come due by the 3rd book.

Mythic Heroes are heroes of unusual power and destiny. They are the chosen few of fate, not the stereotypical farm boy off to be a merc/adventurer to make his fortune but Heroes who have a role in the very fabric of the world. The AP before this could have easily been mythic, as the players are touched by the power of Baga Yaga's dying Black Rider and set out on a epic journey to free the legendary witch from her daughter before an everlasting winter can be unleashed on the world of Golorian.

Mythic Paths


There are a variety of paths and roles that one can walk in pursuit of their mythic destiny.

Archmage: An arcane powerhouse, slinger of spells dire, creator of legendary weapons and capable of shattering Castles with a gesture.
Champion: Martial masters of unparalleled combat skill, masters of the blade so dangerous that they can kill nigh anything with a single blow or masters of the bow who can literally rain a forest of arrows on their foes
Guardians: Titans who can take killing blows and laugh them off or untouchable beings clad in armor.
Hierophant: The speakers of the divine, channeling the very power of the Gods into the world.
Marshall: Able to lead and inspire like no other, the generals and kings to be.
Trickster: The legendary brigand that no cell can hold, or the spy that no one ever recognizes.  There are many different types on the path of the Trickster.

Mythic mechanics
Feats: There are mythic feats and they come in two basic types. Stand alones and ones that are 'add ons' to the ones you already have.
For example. You have Toughness (Mythic) which requires you to have the standard toughness. It provides 2x the hit point gain of toughness AND when you drop to 0 hp or less, you gain DR 10/epic (which stacks with pre-existing DR/epic)
A stand-alone is Two-Handed Drinker, which requires quick draw and gives you the ability to pull two potions/drinks as a move and drink BOTH as a standard action. Not too impressive, unless you're a mythic alchemist. But it has it's points.

Mythic Powers

There are three types of powers, essentially. Universal, which all tiers have access to, and the tier specific ones. As well as the powers that come from being a mythic tiers.
-Basic Tier powers: You gain mythic power, which fuels powers and lets you alter rolls (basically you add your power die to the normal die roll), it scales from +1d6 @ 1st tier to +1d12 @ 10th tier. This is typically called a surge. The other way mythic power comes into play is activating Tier abilities. You also gain things like hard to kill, improved init, and other abilities over time.
-Path Abilities. You have  choice of 3 features for each Path. (you can spend feats/powers to get all 3). Example. Archmages have Arcane Surge (SU) which allows them to expend one use of Mythic power to cast any one spell without expending a slot or learned spell.
-Path Tier Abilities: You gain access to a variety of powers/abilities as you level up in Tiers. 1st, 3rd and 6th level tiers are the points where they come in. Example (Again archmage) 1st Tier: Enduring armor gives the mage an AC Armor Bonus of 3 + their tier. 3rd Tier: Champion: Maneuver Expert, you do not provoke an AoO when you do a combat maneuver. (Ever!) As a free action, you can expend a use of mythic power to gain the Improved/greater versions of that maneuver. 6th-Tier: Tricksters gain access to Precision Critical..which lets them double their precision damage (sneak attack) on criticals.  Universal Abilities are suitably nasty. Like the ability to grant divine spells to your followers @ 3rd tier (with bonus upgrades with additional purchases @ 6ht and 9th)

Mythic Magic: There is only ONE metamagic spell (Ascendent Spell) which lets you cast any qualifying spells as a mythic spell. Okay.. Mythic spells are 'enhanced spells' and come in two manners. There is mythic..which gives a flat upgrade. (For example.. the Cure/Inflict Wounds spells go up to double their die (2d8 for C/ILW) and max out much higher. Then there are augmentations you can do to spells, which can require a specific tier and a specific number of mythic power uses. For example, Haste has Augmented (3rd), for 2 uses of mythic power  the speed increase goes up to +70 ft with no limit based on characters move and with at least 30 ft of movement they can travel across liquids.
The thing is, to get access to the mythic versions you need either Mythic lore and/or Mythic spell casting which both add a certain number of spells based on tier.

Mythic Challenges There are a variety of challenges, such as the various trials you need to advance in tiers.  There specifically mythic creatures (Greater cyclops for one) and a variety of nasty templates you can put on a critter to make it a mythic challenge (Invincible, Savage and Agile to name just a few) and rules for adapting critter to mythic levels outside the quick and dirty templates.
-My local VC had his Goblin Ranger run into a Mythic Vrock at GenCon at the PFS special. It had TWO initiative passes a turn. (one.. then another @ -10 from the first) makes for a nasty fight.
-Some critters get extra goodies for going mythic. Dragon Blood is nasty, yeah.. that red dragon is bleeding LAVA.

That answer most of your questions Chris?
« Last Edit: October 23, 2013, 01:08:40 AM by Callie Del Noire »

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2013, 07:26:46 PM »
Updated to include all the currently released APs.

Also, can anybody recommend any other highly-regarded 3rd Party Publishers/Products?
« Last Edit: October 22, 2013, 07:33:45 PM by Skynet »

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2013, 10:16:14 AM »
Updated to include all the currently released APs.

Also, can anybody recommend any other highly-regarded 3rd Party Publishers/Products?

From the few I've seen.. I'd say that Dreamscarred Press is one good one.

Offline Chris Brady

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2013, 02:01:24 PM »
That answer most of your questions Chris?
A few.  And with my bias right on the table:  The Champion and Guardian, who do they actually feel?  Any specific rules about how they get to do what it is they do?

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2013, 02:26:15 PM »
Well my take (so far.. our Jade Regent group hasn't QUITE had our first trial) is that the Champion is more attack orientated and the Guardian is more defense rated. I took the path abilities and example builds out of the book to show you what the differences are.

Let's see.
-Champion:
Champion’s Strike: Select one of the following abilities. Once chosen, it can’t be changed.
Distant Barrage (Ex): As a swift action, you can expend one use of mythic power to make a ranged attack at your highest attack bonus. This is in addition to any other attacks you make this round. When making this attack, ignore the target’s cover and concealment other than total cover, and add your tier to the attack roll. Damage from this attack bypasses all damage reduction.
Fleet Charge (Ex): As a swift action, you can expend one use of mythic power to move up to your speed. At any point during this movement, you can make a single melee or ranged attack at your highest attack bonus, adding your tier to the attack roll. This is in addition to any other attacks you make this round. Damage from this attack bypasses all damage reduction.
Sudden Attack (Ex): As a swift action, you can expend one use of mythic power to make a melee attack at your highest attack bonus. This is in addition to any other attacks you make this round. When making a sudden attack, you roll twice and take the better result, adding your tier to the attack roll. Damage from this attack bypasses all damage reduction.

Champion Builds
When selecting your champion’s path abilities, you may wish to consider the following themes. Each one suggests a variety of complementary path abilities, with different interpretations of what it means to be mythic force to behold on the field of battle.
Armored Warrior: You are skilled at getting the most out of your armor and punishing those that manage to harm you. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—armor master, backlash, lesson learned, meat shield; 3rd-Tier Abilities—incredible parry, to the death.
Death Dealer: You specialize in dealing a great deal of damage to a single target. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—flash of rage, imprinting hand, mythic weapon training, punishing blow; 3rd-Tier Abilities—elemental fury, maximized critical, penetrating damage, precision; 6th-Tier Abilities—critical master, perfect strike.
Furious Fighter: Your mythic power is tied to the rage that consumes you, leading you to rush headlong into battle. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—burst through, flash of rage, mythic rage; 3rd-Tier Abilities—titan’s rage, to the death; 6th-Tier Abilities—sweeping strike. Maneuver Champion: When it comes to combat maneuvers, you skill is unparalleled. 1st-Tier Path Abilities— aerial assault, blowback, meat shield, sunder storm, tear apart, uncanny grapple; 3rd-Tier Path Abilities—incredible parry, maneuver expert.
Nimble Warrior: You move gracefully around the battlefield, striking at any foe that threatens you. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—burst through, climbing master, impossible speed, swimming master; 3rd-Tier Abilities—fleet warrior; 6th-Tier Abilities—perfect strike.
Smasher: Your skills allow you to destroy the environment to hinder your foes. 1st-Tier Path Abilities— devastating smash, tear apart, wall smasher; 3rd-Tier Abilities—destroyer, titan’s rage; 6th-Tier Abilities— shatter spells.

Guardian:
Guardian’s Call: Select one of the following abilities. Once chosen, it can’t be changed.
Absorb Blow (Su): As an immediate action, whenever you take hit point damage from a single source (such as a dragon’s breath, a spell, or a weapon), you can expend one use of mythic power to reduce the damage you take from that source by 5 per tier (to a minimum of 0 points of
damage taken). If you have another ability or effect that reduces damage (such as protection from energy), reduce the damage with the absorb blow ability before applying any other damage-reducing effects. For every 10 points of damage that this ability prevents, for 1 minute you gain DR 1/epic and 5 points of resistance against acid, cold, electricity, fire, and sonic damage. The DR and resistances stack with any other DR and resistances that you have.
Beast’s Fury (Su): As a swift action, you can expend one use of mythic power to imbue your animal companion, cohort, eidolon, familiar, or bonded mount with some of your mythic power. As an immediate action, that creature can move up to its speed and make an attack with one of its natural weapons. When making this attack, the creature rolls twice and takes the higher result. Any damage dealt by this attack bypasses all damage reduction. A creature affected by this ability can take these actions in addition to any others that it takes during its turn.
Sudden Block (Su): As an immediate action, you can expend one use of mythic power to hinder a melee attack made against you or an adjacent ally. Add your tier to your AC or the ally’s AC against this attack. The creature making the attack must make two attack rolls and take
the lower result. Once the attack is resolved, you or your ally (your choice) can make one melee attack against the creature. The damage from this attack bypasses all damage reduction

Guardian Builds
When selecting your guardian’s path abilities, you may wish to consider the following themes. Each one suggests a variety of complementary path abilities, with different interpretations of what it means to be mythic defender.
Dangerous Duo: Many of your powers give your companion, such as an animal or bonded mount, additional abilities. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—empathic healing, pack wildshape, raise animal; 3rd-Tier Abilities—impervious body,impervious companion, possess companion, shrug it off;
6th-Tier Abilities—companion power, take the hit.
Defender: Your abilities empower you to protect those around you from harm. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—draw fire, empathic healing, guardian’s shout, relentless healing; 3rd-Tier Abilities—cage enemy, earth protection, parry spell; 6th-Tier Abilities—take the hit.
Immovable Warrior: Your guardian path abilities make you impossible to move, and prevent enemies from escaping your reach. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—avenging maneuver, immovable, retributive reach; 3rd-Tier Abilities— cage enemy, dimensional grappler, turn the tables; 6th-Tier
Abilities—invincible stand.
Invincible Guardian: Your path abilities make you nearly impossible to kill. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—armor master, fast healing, quick recovery; 3rd-Tier Abilities—impervious body, shrug it off, to the death; 6th-Tier Abilities—cling to life, invincible stand, mythic resolve.
Nature Guardian: You rely on nature’s resiliency to strengthen you. 1st-Tier Path Abilities—adamantine mind, empathic healing, knowledgeable guardian, partial transformation, raise animal, supreme tracker; 3rd-Tier Abilities—earth protection, possess companion; 6th-Tier Abilities—companion power, indomitable.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2013, 05:29:14 PM »
How many tiers are there for Mythic Heroes?

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2013, 05:48:22 PM »
How many tiers are there for Mythic Heroes?

10. The number of trials increase as you level up. And the scope of them is pretty big as you go up.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2013, 06:19:20 PM »
Classes

Like the Dungeons & Dragons system it is based off of, common character archetypes are divided into Classes.  Although there is some versatility within the roles, each one has an assumed role for new players.



The Barbarian is based off of the Norse Berserkers.  They are very skilled at melee combat, and they channel their anger into greater fighting prowess through Rage and Rage Powers.



The Bard is part musician, part scholar, part jack/jill of all trades.  Bards have a special ability called Bardic Music, which bestow a variety of effects on listeners, the most common being inspirational boosts to party members and distracting foes.  Bards also gain a bonus on Knoweldge-related skills, and have some skill in arcane magic. 



The Cleric is traditionally either a healer or an armored battlecaster in 3rd Edition, but that's just scratching the surface.  Clerics are divine spellcasters, receiving their powers from the Gods and Goddesses of Golarion.  Each deity has a set of Domains with spells based around a common theme, such as Sun, Destruction, Water, and Trickery, which grant additional spells to a Cleric's repertoire.  Clerics can also Turn Undead, an ability where they brandish a holy symbol and inspire either fear of subservience (depending upon their deity's moral stance).



The Druid is a devotee of nature, seeking to safeguard nature from unnatural influences.  They are divine spellcasters much like the Cleric, but they can also transform into animals with an ability called Wildshape, and they can either gain the service of an Animal Companion or a nature-themed Domain.  Druids also get an array of minor abilities to help them survive in the wilds.



The Fighter is exactly what it says on the tin.  They can master a variety of martial abilities, from sword-fighting to archery.  Their primary feature is bonus Combat Feats, resistance to fear-based effects, and easier maneuverability in armor.



The Monk is the quintessential martial artist, specializing in unarmed combat and a variety of Eastern-themed weapons.  They also make passable scouts, and while not spellcasters have access to many supernatural abilities (healing touch, falling slowly, etc).



The Paladin is a holy warrior of Law and Good.  In addition to being skilled fighters, they can channel holy energy into their attacks with Smite Evil, and they have limited access to divine magic.  Paladins also gain an array of thematic abilities, such as a supernatural mount to ride into battle, the laying on of hands, immunity to fear and diseases, and the ability to detect whether or not people are Evil at will.



The Ranger is a cross between a hunter, a scout, a guerrilla fighter, and a warrior of nature.  Rangers are mobile fighters, usually specializing in archery or two-weapon fighting.  Like the Druid they can access to spells and an animal companion, although these features are not as powerful as their Druid counterpart.  One of the Rangers' iconic abilities includes Favored Enemy, where they gain bonuses on combat and skill rolls against a pre-selected monster type, and Favored Terrain for similar benefits but for a climate type.



The Rogue is a stealthy, thief-like class.  In addition to gaining the most skills of all the Core Classes, they deal additional damage to opponents caught off-guard with Sneak Attack.  Rogues also have the ability to perceive hidden dangers easily via Trapfinding, Uncanny Dodge, and similar abilities.  At higher levels Rogues gain access to Talents, which either enhance existing abilities or grant new ones.



The Sorcerer is a spellcaster whose powers derive from a supernatural ancestor.  Frail in body, Sorcerers along with Wizards have the least hit points of all the classes, usually relying upon allies to shield them from danger.  In addition to a powerful and versatile spell list, Sorcerers gain access to Bloodline Powers and Bloodline Spells, which grant additional unique abilities and spells based upon their ancestry.  A huge amount of bloodlines are available, ranging from extraplanar demons and angels, Lovecraftian horrors, djinni and elementals, and even the mighty dragons!



The Wizard is a lot like the sorcerer in that they both use arcane magic and draw from the same list.  What differentiates them is that the Wizard has fewer spells to cast per day, but can switch out and prepare new ones from their Spellbook after a long resting period.  Whereas a Sorcerer has Bloodlines, Wizards have Schools of Magic where they gain enhanced proficiency with magic of the related school (Enchantment for mind-control spells, Necromancy for death magic, etc).

Both Sorcerers and Wizards can have Familiars, small supernatural creatures who assist them in their duties (like an enhanced version of Harry Potter's owl, Hedwig).



There are other classes available, but they're inside supplementary rulebooks.  The 11 above should be enough for new groups.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 06:32:09 PM by Skynet »

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #19 on: November 04, 2013, 01:07:07 AM »
In related news, Fire Mountain Games released Part One of their new Throne of Night Adventure Path.

It's and Underdark sandbox game where you play either as honorable Dwarves or ruthless Drow staking out a claim in the frontier regions of a nearby undergroun gnomish town.  It's made by the same creators of Way of the Wicked, no less!


Offline Dhi

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #20 on: November 06, 2013, 09:17:28 AM »


The Cleric is traditionally either a healer or an armored battlecaster in 3rd Edition, but that's just scratching the surface.  Clerics are divine spellcasters, receiving their powers from the Gods and Goddesses of Golarion.  Each deity has a set of Domains with spells based around a common theme, such as Sun, Destruction, Water, and Trickery, which grant additional spells to a Cleric's repertoire.  Clerics can also Turn Undead, an ability where they brandish a holy symbol and inspire either fear of subservience (depending upon their deity's moral stance).

I love Kyra so much, you don't even know.

I wish that I could still get into 3rd Edition, because there's no shortage of Pathfinder games happening on E. I do pick up a lot of the gazetteer style books, though, because they're cheap (as these things go) and mostly flavor, which the talent brings to life in a commendable way.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2013, 08:09:32 PM »
I love Kyra so much, you don't even know.

I wish that I could still get into 3rd Edition, because there's no shortage of Pathfinder games happening on E. I do pick up a lot of the gazetteer style books, though, because they're cheap (as these things go) and mostly flavor, which the talent brings to life in a commendable way.

I find that Pathfinder's more suited to things like Roll20 and "live" sessions than play-by posts (or at least from what I've watched online).  It's much easier for rules-lite games to flow in PbP role-play.

Now, I really don't own many books on the campaign setting proper (the Inner Sea).  Would you or anyone else be interested in doing a more detailed "Tell Me About the Setting!" post?  Or is the Inner Sea World Guide enough?

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2013, 08:24:34 PM »
I find that Pathfinder's more suited to things like Roll20 and "live" sessions than play-by posts (or at least from what I've watched online).  It's much easier for rules-lite games to flow in PbP role-play.

Now, I really don't own many books on the campaign setting proper (the Inner Sea).  Would you or anyone else be interested in doing a more detailed "Tell Me About the Setting!" post?  Or is the Inner Sea World Guide enough?

The Inner Sea Guide is all you really need.  From there you can divide most of the campaign books into three categories: The country/location books, the species books and the 'primers'. The later either covers things like a region (dragon empire, inner sea), a specific focus (monster/locations types) or group (pathfinders). I have a lot of them.

Offline SkynetTopic starter

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2013, 08:52:51 PM »
I might do an "Inner Sea Write-Up" later, then.

Online Callie Del Noire

Re: This thread is about Pathfinder RPG!
« Reply #24 on: November 06, 2013, 08:56:46 PM »
I might do an "Inner Sea Write-Up" later, then.

My suggestion would be to do the Inner Sea Guide. :d