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Author Topic: Autism or Affectation?  (Read 10136 times)

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Offline ladia2287

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2013, 04:43:22 AM »
Judging from my understanding, I don't think your symptoms would be getting worse. I think, most likely, you've simply become more aware of them. Conditions such as autism or Aspergers, as far as I am aware, don't 'get worse' like other disorders. However, if you're only recently diagnosed, then you'll be much more aware of various behaviours which your psychologist/psychiatrist described as being symptomatic to Asperger Syndrome.

Previously, I'm guessing you wouldn't have batted an eyelid about being heavily schedule-dependant and described yourself merely as being fanatic about planning as many details of your day-to-day life in advance as possible.

Now that you understand that this is an aspect of a condition with which you have been diagnosed, it is quite natural psychologically to be much more aware of it, just as someone who has been diagnosed with chronic depression is not going through any wilder mood swings than they did before the diagnosis was made, but the diagnosis and explanation of the symptoms causes them to be hyper-aware of their mood swings going forward. It's a completely normal reaction for your brain to be taking; we are conditioned to be more aware of these things as they might enable a predator to overpower us more easily.

If you have any concerns, then go back to the professional who diagnosed you and get their medical opinion. It's possible that your diagnosis might need to be adjusted as many Autism Spectrum Disorders are very similar in terms of symptoms, but it sounds like your doctor was pretty thorough. Nonetheless, talk to them and see what they say. That is the best option :)

Offline DashenkaTopic starter

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2013, 06:32:10 AM »
It is indeed mostly because I'm aware of it.

Offline Helmut Todstern

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2013, 07:25:13 PM »
My, there are a lot of us here. ^.^

I was diagnosed in March of last year, and my immediate reaction was "I need to grab this by the horns and steer it in the way I want it to go." So I spent the last year and then some trying to overcome it, and I consider to have a handle on some of its aspects. For me, the answer was easy, for others its complex.

I'll sum it up as: when I approach someone to talk, I roleplay as a version of myself that I would want to be, and it helps me avoid some of the anxiety. But it works for me, not sure how it would work for others.

But it's nice to know there are other Aspies on E :3

Offline Aislinn

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Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2013, 05:16:21 PM »
Hello!

I wanted to let you know that my 17-year-old son has PDD-NOS. So while I don't have it, I'm extremely well-versed in it. If you ever need to talk, my pm is always available.  ;D

~leaves hugs and holiday cookies~

Offline BraveEarth

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2013, 11:38:59 AM »
As someone with Asperger's who was diagnosed early I'm always happy to talk to the fellow people with Asperger's

Offline Wyatt

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Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2013, 06:08:20 PM »
Like Aislinn, I too have a son with that diagnosis.  He is ten now and always tested as borderline on the spectrum until about two years ago when he began having more significant social problems.  The issue really wasn't that he changed or that his autism got worse, it really isn't an illness, just a different way his and many people's brains are wired.  The big change was more in the world around him, his peers were gaining new social skills and facing socialization challenges that befuddled him, which lead to anger, anxiety and frustration.

A year later after a thorough examination over several days, finding well-qualified specialists and support groups to work with our entire family, and with a very caring and cooperative school district, he is back on track, learning who he is, working on a theory of mind manner of understanding how his way of thinking might differ from the societal norm, and that while there are challenges to it, there are also inherent advantages too.

One interesting thing I found is that he does not like the term Asperger's, but does not mind the word autism at all.  The other thing I found through all of this is that we are all on a spectrum of behavior and manners of thought, one which has helped me understand some of my own quirks, especially in the sensory processing areas.  The fact that some places on that spectrum are labeled "normal", is just another way of saying similar or average.  There is no such thing as truly normal, just some relative definitions of it that society at large are comfortable with.

Any time you want to talk, I am happy to listen and share, Dashenka. (:

Offline Paladin101

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2013, 09:20:54 AM »
I've never been diagnosed, mainly because I refuse to take pills or treatments for maladies of the mind, but my mother has long felt I have mild autism, and I fit the description. I am extremely attached to a schedule, forced deviation from it gets my blood boiling, as well as several other factors. Luckily when it comes to OCD I don't have that in extremes, though it does drive me crazy if things are not arranged in a pattern, or if the pattern is present but something is throwing it off.

When it comes to "How do you train yourself out of something your comfortable with", it comes down to mental discipline in my opinion. When I was in high school I was an extreme introvert, and crowds scared the hell out of me. I was aware of this, and made the choice to combat it. I got a job that put me front and center with people and forced me to interact with them, and I purposely chose school courses that would put me in front of crowds, drama, school play, debate, and mock trial. All of these made me extremely nervous, but by the time I was done, I found myself better able to cope with crowds, I had learned a method for dealing with them by forcing myself into the situation in a controlled manner. I still get nervous in crowds, and the bar scene as a result makes me extremely uncomfortable, but if I get into those situations, I now have a method to fall into that helps me control my anxiety, and interact in those situations.

I guess my point is don't get worked up over it. If you have autism/aspergers, then you've always had it. Don't let the knowledge of your diagnosis change your life, live how you want, and just accept that you are what you are. Don't let it influence your thoughts, or deter you from attempting anything. As someone else said, if you are seeing a counselor, make certain you talk to them and listen to their advice. I've been fortunate enough to have a mother wise enough and who knows me well enough to guide me and let me know when my mental issues are getting out of hand, and that I needed to reign it in. It helps to get an outside perspective.

Offline GypsyLily

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2013, 01:02:07 AM »
Syndromes...disorders...

When did it become necessary to label people?  Can't we all just embrace all the diversity of opinions and ideologies?  My nephew was diagnosed with Asperger's recently and my sister acted like it was nothing short of the end of times.  I only see a brilliant and misunderstood soul...one that will thrive in an environment of research and internal study.  Why did that become vilified?  Perhaps I'm crazy too, but I see only pure genius.

*tosses two coppers on the table and walks out with a smile*

Offline Oniya

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Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2013, 01:15:21 AM »
Darryl Hannah.  Dan Ackroyd.  Satoshi Tajiri.  All of these people have been diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.  People like Tim Burton and Bill Gates have 'shown signs' of being on the spectrum, but have not been formally diagnosed.  True, not everyone will wind up developing an incredibly popular video game, or having a long-running cinematic career, but these people show that it isn't in any sense 'the end of times'. 

Offline Doedie

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2014, 03:17:21 AM »
It isn't on the autism spectrum, but I was diagnosed with dysgraphia when I was younger, it's a form of dyslexia. I can't write for shit, like, my handwriting looks more like a kid drawing random shapes than text. At first I got a bit of heat from my classmates for being 'different', which isn't that acceptable in Greece, but after entering university nobody really cares.

Offline Sabby

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2014, 08:21:57 AM »
My own autism has been making interactions difficult for me over the last year :/ Other peoples emotions make me uncomfortable, and I tend to either disregard or mock them as a way to distance myself from it. I almost always regret it later, so I'm aware of how uncalled for it is, I just become volatile if I feel as if emotions are being forced on me, and contemptuous if I feel someone is less intelligent then me. I've been called a Vulcan and robot for it.

Obviously, this isn't behavior I'm happy with, and I'm more then a little ashamed to admit it. Was just curious if anyone else on the spectrum has had similar feelings.

Edit: Example, the other day I saw an animation (a very beautiful one) and I showed my friend, but I admitted I didn't quite get it. He started explaining how it was about a mother sacrificing herself to save her son, and his description was making me feel things. Without meaning to, I told him to shut up, like I didn't want him to continue, since it was making me feel things against my will. I apologized afterwards (he's aware of my difficulties).
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 08:25:14 AM by Sabby »

Offline Chrystal

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2014, 09:30:27 AM »
I have just now made an appointment with my doctor, with a view to getting my self-diagnosis confirmed.

Offline Sabby

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2014, 09:32:09 AM »
Good work :)

Offline Chrystal

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2014, 09:43:25 AM »
Question is, what happens if they say "don't be silly, you're perfectly normal", when I know I'm not? That actually worries me!

Offline DashenkaTopic starter

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2014, 10:00:21 AM »
Syndromes...disorders...

When did it become necessary to label people?  Can't we all just embrace all the diversity of opinions and ideologies?  My nephew was diagnosed with Asperger's recently and my sister acted like it was nothing short of the end of times.  I only see a brilliant and misunderstood soul...one that will thrive in an environment of research and internal study.  Why did that become vilified?  Perhaps I'm crazy too, but I see only pure genius.

*tosses two coppers on the table and walks out with a smile*

It's not necessary to label people but in some countries, 'being labelled' grants you 'access' to certain services. For example if I can show that I cannot function in an office environment (which I can't) because I'm easily distracted and I can't do manual labour because I got a hip problem or something you are seriously limited with finding a job. I know the Netherlands there are government services that will provide for your life support but in order to get that money, you need to be diagnosed with whatever it is you have.

It's also the social acceptance. I run a good business and when people meet me they don't see the autist woman in me which leads them to say things like 'I can't see it on you' or 'I have that and that as well and I'm not an autistic person'.

A lot of people don't know the three subgroups of the autism spectrum and they don't know there are gradations in it as well. They only know the classic Forrest Gump cases where the person cannot look people in the eyes, is a complete social retard, etc etc. People like me (and I bet there are a lot of others here as well), where you can't see it, have the same problems and issues but because it cannot be seen, people react differently.

My own autism has been making interactions difficult for me over the last year :/

I have the feeling that since I got diagnosed, it's getting harder for me. Whatever the reason is for that.

Question is, what happens if they say "don't be silly, you're perfectly normal", when I know I'm not? That actually worries me!

Nothing. You feel how you feel, nothing will change it unless you want it to change. They asked me the question the other way around. What I would do if I would get diagnosed. I said: nothing. I'll still be me. Besides.. you aren't normal.. you're a cat woman :D

Offline Chrystal

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2014, 02:54:13 PM »
Well, I saw the Dr today.

First point, he agrees with me that I do have Asperger's and is referring me to a psychologist.

Second point. He is also wanting to treat me for depression. This is probably a good thing...


Offline Sabby

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #41 on: January 08, 2014, 02:56:06 PM »
Medication is extremely helpful when you get it right.

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Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #42 on: January 09, 2014, 07:25:48 AM »
O_O;  There are a lot more here than I originally thought.  Wow.....I've only known one other person personally before coming to this place who had it and she had moved away a long time ago, leaving me feeling alone in the world.  That said, I am extremely pleased to know that there are others around here that know what it's like to feel alienated by most others.

As far as I know, I've been diagnosed with AS since before it became an official diagnosis.  My original doctor, may he rest in peace, looked at what I was going through differently than the others I had been to who often prescribed anti-depressants (turned me into a mindless, nearly drooling zombie) or similar.  It all made sense after he explained everything to me.

*Hugs for everyone*  This has made my day, finding more reasons to love this site and everyone in it  <3

Offline DashenkaTopic starter

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2014, 08:21:26 AM »
Glad to help :)

Offline Chrystal

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2014, 08:50:42 AM »
I have, for now, declined the medication option, with good reason.

Rant - read at your own risk
Medication for depression treats the symptoms, not the cause. In the USA, I have noticed that there is a strong tendency to go straight for the "quick fix" option. Take a pill and feel better. There is a generation of young people over there who have been on anti-depressants pretty much there whole lives!

This may be an exaggeration, but not much of one.

Young people in the states are prescribed anti-depressants at the drop of a hat, with no attempt being made to try and find out why they are depressed. They then get hooked on the drugs and when rying to come off them, slip back into clinical depression.

A much better solution is talking therapy. Instead of taking a pill, you talk through your issues, find the causes and deal with them. In some cases, the two can and should be used in conjunction, but in my opinion, drugs are very often the first resort when they should be the last.

I can't help wondering how much of this is down to the lax use of the English language over there?

Do you know the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist? Hollywood doesn't, and has perpetuated the fallacy that they are the same.

A psychiatrist will prescribe drugs. A psychologist will talk to you about your problems. I do wonder whether the fact that people don't know there is a difference is responsible for the over-use of anti-depressants?

So, he gave me an information sheet for the local NHS clinical psychology department.

Need to contact them and make some sort of appointment, I guess...

Offline Sabby

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #45 on: January 09, 2014, 08:53:34 AM »
How is treating the symptoms not helpful? Pills aren't going to make this go away, they're supposed to help you deal with it while you pursue real solutions, which I assume your doing with therapy.

Offline Chrystal

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #46 on: January 09, 2014, 09:08:18 AM »
How is treating the symptoms not helpful? Pills aren't going to make this go away, they're supposed to help you deal with it while you pursue real solutions, which I assume your doing with therapy.

I didn't say treating the symptoms wasn't helpful, just that it should not be the only approach.

If I have flu, then treating the symptoms is the correct thing to do.

If I have gall stones, however, then treating the symptoms could, in fact, be the worst thing possible!

If someone is clinically depressed because they are in a situation that is harmful, making them feel good is not the way forward. The correct thing to do is find out why they are depressed, Identify the cause of the depression and remove it. Then they will feel better anyway, without the need for drugs.

In the event that the person is so depressed that they are potentially going to harm themselves or others, then yes, medication is necessary.

And, thinking about it, suppose someone is in a situation that is causing depression, so they are prescribed anti-depressants first, and advised to seek counselling. They start taking the anti-depressants, and feel better. They thus don't see the need for counselling. But as you so rightly said, the pills don't make the problem go away. Sooner or later it's going to rear it's ugly head again and then there is a crisis!

I'm honestly not an expert, and will be quite happy to be corrected on any and all points, but these are my opinions, formed from observation and common sense.

Offline DashenkaTopic starter

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #47 on: January 09, 2014, 09:42:54 AM »
Deal with what? It's not the end of the world. So we got Aspergers. As you said pills will not solve it or make it go away. Then why take pills?


You just have to accept that you have limitations and deal with them. Pills don't make you more social, or more flexible or whatever it is that makes up your Asperger. Pills won't do anything to help with those symptoms.

It's not a broken arm or a bruised foot. Pills is exactly the reason why I dreaded to go see my councillor. I've heard stories as well.

"I've been feeling a little down recently since my dog died."
"Oh I know just the pill for you."

Nonsense, pills are the secret stash of doctors. They get paid for it and they don't help anything.

Offline Sabby

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #48 on: January 09, 2014, 10:01:22 AM »
Deal with what? It's not the end of the world. So we got Aspergers. As you said pills will not solve it or make it go away. Then why take pills?


You just have to accept that you have limitations and deal with them. Pills don't make you more social, or more flexible or whatever it is that makes up your Asperger. Pills won't do anything to help with those symptoms.

It's not a broken arm or a bruised foot. Pills is exactly the reason why I dreaded to go see my councillor. I've heard stories as well.

"I've been feeling a little down recently since my dog died."
"Oh I know just the pill for you."

Nonsense, pills are the secret stash of doctors. They get paid for it and they don't help anything.

Sorry, but this is a rather firebrand response in my opinion.

The fact a pill can't magically make you 'normal' isn't a reason not to take it. It's not supposed to do that. Aren't we allowed to be dissatisfied with our difficulties and seek to make things better for ourselves? Admitting we aren't happy with something that we will likely live with our whole lives is not the same thing as saying we're 'not right'. I don't mean to come off as confrontational, but the whole 'So what! We are who we are! We're not broken! Don't need pills!' and the general mistrust of doctors are two things I've had to deal with a lot through out my life, and it's never seemed justified or rational to me. It actually comes across as very paranoid and counter productive. Yes, some pills are prescribed too frequently, or for poor reasons. But is that reason to push away the entire industry while repeating NOPE I'm fine, just fine, yes sir, nothing wrong with me!

Look, it's like this.

I have difficulty conveying my thoughts and emotions. I'm not happy with that difficulty, and I never will be. So I try and limit it's impact on my life. Guess what? There are pills out there that do help me organize my thoughts and focus better. It won't make the problem go away, but I don't expect it to. It's there to help me while I try and make my life better.

What is wrong with that?

Offline DashenkaTopic starter

Re: Autism or Affectation?
« Reply #49 on: January 09, 2014, 10:14:31 AM »
There is nothing wrong with that but in most cases, as Chrystal said, pills just mask what's underneath and unfortunately 90% of all doctors are too incompetent or lazy to find out what's underneath so they prescribe pills, hoping it makes people feel better.

I've lost somebody VERY dear to me like that because doctors diagnosed her meningitis as a common flu and decided that pills would help and even when she started to lose her sight said it was a simple migraine.

Of course if pills help for you, who am I to tell you not to take them, they just shouldn't be taken or considered as the ultimate cure or the only thing that can make you feel better.