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Author Topic: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)  (Read 738 times)

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Online InkiduTopic starter

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So, one of my long-term projects for when I finally start bringing in real taxable money is to build myself a new desktop computer (for gaming), just the way I want. I have vague and rather rudimentary knowledge of the bits and pieces that makes up a PC. 

So what I'm asking is:

What basic parts do you need to make the computer run. I know you need a motherboard, hard drive(s), other things.

What is a good, nay exceptional incarnation of any of the elements above and why (you can RadionXY-22-34-ninty-seven-J at me all day long. I want to know what it means and why it's superior over another set of letters and numbers).

Other equipment I'll need. Cooling systems, drives, wifi adapters and whatnot.

Ultimately I want to build a gaming PC that's stable, physically robust (not fragile), easy to maintain, and upgrade. I would like to have to replace or upgrade parts as little as possible. I know that's impossible, but hey! Let's give it the old college try.

Offline Dovel

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2013, 05:35:51 PM »
Hello Inkidu.

That is a tough question, for like buying a car, everyone has their desired tastes. The first question though would be, how much do you want to spend?

But even before you answer I can give you some helpful advice being a PC gamer myself for many years. Don't go cheap on your Power Supply or Memory. While some parts of your PC are fine to buy generic brands for, don't do this with those two items. Spend a bit extra and get them from a brand name company. It will save you lots of trouble.

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2013, 05:45:27 PM »
Honestly, with all the people saying you can get a decent one for $600 and whatnot let's say this one will be $1500 to $2000 dollars, but since it's an intellectual exercise money's not that important.

Though, this should also include a keyboard, mouse, and monitor (just one).

Offline Dovel

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2013, 07:47:45 AM »
Well my friend to be honest if you were to spend that much money and don't know a lot about computers. I would just go to CyberPower PC Gaming.

If you look at the prices for their parts and then compare them to a place like New Egg You will see you are not saving very much from building your own. And you will get a parts replacement from them if something goes wrong.

I recommend an Intel System. Upgrade any system to at least a 850w Power Supply and buy the Kingston Memory. Don't go generic on those parts. I also recommend a Nvida Geforce Video Card. That is just a personal choice though. Radeon work just as well but I have always had luck with Nvidia drivers.

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2013, 08:24:19 AM »
I suppose I better look at top-of-the-line AlienWare PCs to see what they rock. I don't think they use all solid-state hard drives for instance. I'm not trying to out cheap them (honestly you pay most for the name with stuff like that) I'm trying to do better with comparable cost. :\

Offline Dovel

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2013, 08:35:43 AM »
I would avoid the AlienWare PC line. Very overpriced and not built very well. They use substandard parts and have poor customer service. I did buy a CyberPower PC before and they have worked well.


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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2013, 12:12:55 PM »
I would avoid the AlienWare PC line. Very overpriced and not built very well. They use substandard parts and have poor customer service. I did buy a CyberPower PC before and they have worked well.
Then I'll look at those. :\

I'm looking for a benchmark to see if I can beat it. I'd really like a fairly hassle free PC where upgrading, cleaning, and maintenance are concerned.   

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2013, 12:47:01 PM »
If you're going to be doing a lot of rummaging in the guts of a PC, make sure you invest in one of those grounding straps - especially if you live in a climate that gets dry in the winter. 

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2013, 12:50:48 PM »
That's neat, Oniya. Speaking of which what would anyone recommend for getting dust inside a computer case? It happens, my desktop once quit because it was so dusty. So I got compressed air and blew it out. I'm wondering if there's something better than compressed air though. :\

Offline Moraline

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2013, 01:02:47 PM »
Cyberpower and IBuypower gaming PC's are roomy and easily upgradeable. Usually the biggest draw back to them is a weak power supply.

I posted a couple of higher end builds in another thread for MagicalPen in this section as well.

But here's a list of basic components needed to build a PC (box only). Keyboards, Mice, and Monitors are totally seperate and highly individual.

PC Parts List:
Case
Motherboard
Processor
Memory (RAM)
Hard Drive (and/or SSD)
Graphics Card(s)
Optical Drive
Card Reader (optional - SDHD/SD etc)
Power Supply
Operating System

- Start with motherboard and processor to ensure that they are compatible.
Determine if you want an SSD (solid state drive) now or in the future then ensure you Mobo has a compatible firmware for it (most high end new ones do.)
- Check to see what the motherboards RAM type and limitations are.
- If you want to expand to two graphics cards it's best to make sure the motherboard accurately supports that with firmware and sockets (Personally, I feel it's a massive waste of money but some people just like to be on the bleeding edge of high end performance.)
- When looking at power supplies, usually you can go by what the Graphics card requires but if you want to perform optimally then you might want to add 20-30% more then the suggested size.  So if a graphics card suggests a 500 Watt, then I'd go with a 600-650 on a slightly more expensive brand because it's more then just wattage. You all need to be aware of your over/underage as well. Power control is more important to the PC then the direct wattage. A cheap 800+ watt power supply could end up causing no end of problems. But remember 2 graphics cards, means 2x as much power consumption.

As for picking RAM, Dovel suggested Kingston and they are a moderately good brand but for performance on a budget I suggest going with G.Skill. They design performance based RAM specifically for gaming and graphics heavy applications. When looking at RAM it's the CAS Latency that will most strongly effect performance. For a new build PC I suggest trying to go with a motherboard that will support "DDR3 1600" or better (bigger numbers faster RAM).

Dovel suggested Intel Processors and NVidia video cards. I second those options but they will cost an abhorrently large amount. You can save 100's of dollars by going with AMD processors and graphics cards and they will generally perform nearly as well. He is right though, on the graphics cards side, AMD graphics drivers tend to be the most problematic.

For a processor, I'd go with an 8 Core because for the next couple years that will most likely remain the standard even as new lines come out. Generally that means for Intel Processors you want to go with an I7 (socket LGA 1155 or 2011), and AMD FX 8___ or A8(or higher) - (Sockets AM3+, FM1, or FM2). The A series AMD processors actually have a built in graphics chip set that I haven't entirely wrapped my head around yet but they will act as a dual graphics processor when used with another AMD graphics card or can be used as a standalone graphics processor. Processors with larger amounts of L2/L3 cache perform better.

That's neat, Oniya. Speaking of which what would anyone recommend for getting dust inside a computer case? It happens, my desktop once quit because it was so dusty. So I got compressed air and blew it out. I'm wondering if there's something better than compressed air though. :\
Compressed air and cleaning with a tiny object (cloth) that doesn't leave any cloth behind is the best/safest you can do.

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2013, 01:16:54 PM »
I know what you mean about the dust.  When my ex-roommate 'donated' her computer to the little Oni, we went to fire it up and got nothing.  I could see clumps of dust that looked like black wool (she was also a smoker, and swore she wasn't smoking in the house.)  The machine was a complete paperweight.

Online InkiduTopic starter

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2013, 01:47:57 PM »
Cyberpower and IBuypower gaming PC's are roomy and easily upgradeable. Usually the biggest draw back to them is a weak power supply.

I posted a couple of higher end builds in another thread for MagicalPen in this section as well.

But here's a list of basic components needed to build a PC (box only). Keyboards, Mice, and Monitors are totally seperate and highly individual.

PC Parts List:
Case
Motherboard
Processor
Memory (RAM)
Hard Drive (and/or SSD)
Graphics Card(s)
Optical Drive
Card Reader (optional - SDHD/SD etc)
Power Supply
Operating System

- Start with motherboard and processor to ensure that they are compatible.
Determine if you want an SSD (solid state drive) now or in the future then ensure you Mobo has a compatible firmware for it (most high end new ones do.)
- Check to see what the motherboards RAM type and limitations are.
- If you want to expand to two graphics cards it's best to make sure the motherboard accurately supports that with firmware and sockets (Personally, I feel it's a massive waste of money but some people just like to be on the bleeding edge of high end performance.)
- When looking at power supplies, usually you can go by what the Graphics card requires but if you want to perform optimally then you might want to add 20-30% more then the suggested size.  So if a graphics card suggests a 500 Watt, then I'd go with a 600-650 on a slightly more expensive brand because it's more then just wattage. You all need to be aware of your over/underage as well. Power control is more important to the PC then the direct wattage. A cheap 800+ watt power supply could end up causing no end of problems. But remember 2 graphics cards, means 2x as much power consumption.

As for picking RAM, Dovel suggested Kingston and they are a moderately good brand but for performance on a budget I suggest going with G.Skill. They design performance based RAM specifically for gaming and graphics heavy applications. When looking at RAM it's the CAS Latency that will most strongly effect performance. For a new build PC I suggest trying to go with a motherboard that will support "DDR3 1600" or better (bigger numbers faster RAM).

Dovel suggested Intel Processors and NVidia video cards. I second those options but they will cost an abhorrently large amount. You can save 100's of dollars by going with AMD processors and graphics cards and they will generally perform nearly as well. He is right though, on the graphics cards side, AMD graphics drivers tend to be the most problematic.

For a processor, I'd go with an 8 Core because for the next couple years that will most likely remain the standard even as new lines come out. Generally that means for Intel Processors you want to go with an I7 (socket LGA 1155 or 2011), and AMD FX 8___ or A8(or higher) - (Sockets AM3+, FM1, or FM2). The A series AMD processors actually have a built in graphics chip set that I haven't entirely wrapped my head around yet but they will act as a dual graphics processor when used with another AMD graphics card or can be used as a standalone graphics processor. Processors with larger amounts of L2/L3 cache perform better.
Compressed air and cleaning with a tiny object (cloth) that doesn't leave any cloth behind is the best/safest you can do.
Uh... sure... yeah...

Offline Moraline

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2013, 02:12:03 PM »
Uh... sure... yeah...
LOL.... Well you asked about the basics of building a computer. Ask and ye shall receive.

This is why I stress in my other posts that it's often easier and makes more sense to just buy one these days.

Go to Newegg and look around at the Gaming PC's in your price range and I'm sure you'll find lots of great options.

Aim for the best processor you can afford and a good graphics card. The rest will be up to specs and good if those two components are good. If you'd like a couple suggestions then just let me know and I'll point out a couple.
(The ones I posted in Magical Pen's thread are pretty good machines for a good price.)

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2013, 02:14:18 PM »
Yeah, but the one thing I asked was not to be inundated with numbers, letters, and jargon. XD

It you can't tell me what it means and why then I'm going to have a hard time knowing the difference.

Offline Moraline

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2013, 02:41:35 PM »
Yeah, but the one thing I asked was not to be inundated with numbers, letters, and jargon. XD

It you can't tell me what it means and why then I'm going to have a hard time knowing the difference.
What your asking for is a massively long series of posts. I can explain anything that you want me to explain but it's going to take a awhile and lots of posting.

Why don't you start with a specific question about a single component and I'll explain it and you can ask questions from there? That is if you still actually want to learn about building a computer.


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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2013, 03:23:04 PM »
What your asking for is a massively long series of posts. I can explain anything that you want me to explain but it's going to take a awhile and lots of posting.

Why don't you start with a specific question about a single component and I'll explain it and you can ask questions from there? That is if you still actually want to learn about building a computer.
CAS ram and latency. I didn't even realize that they made ram for gaming :\ I figured more RAM meant more Random Access Memory which mean that you could use more of a processor's power (up to a point naturally I mean you can't exceed a processor's ability to process no matter how much ram you have. How much ram would be good? I figure I'd go with six Gigs if I could get it most stuff wants around 3 or 4. Though I hardly know what I'm talking about.

Offline Moraline

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2013, 05:06:11 PM »
Excellent questions. You're on the right track and you have the right basic idea.

Old systems could only use about 3.5 GB of RAM but new ones will use much more. 
((This is because of the 32 bit OS vs the 64 bit OS. Any new OS will most likely be Windows 7 64bit or newer))

Typically when you look at a game it might say something like 4GB recommended. That means that the game will process enough information rapidly enough to fill up 4GB. However some games can and will use more if you have it.

Most new systems come standard with 8GB because typically games and high end software can easily suck up 6 or 7 GB's at a time. The extra couple GB of RAM are so if you try to run other programs simultaneously - Ex: Skype, Browser, Music Players, etc...

So ideally you want 8 GB, if you are ready to spend the money then getting 16 will give you lots of extra room for future expansion (you can go as high as 32 in really high end systems but it's overkill.)



Now onto the topic of types of RAM - Gaming Vs Standard.

Standard RAM looks like (This is an older model but typical RAM looks the same with black chips showing):


Gaming RAM usually looks more like this:


The plating on the outside of gaming RAM allows the even distribution of the heat that's generated as the component is put under stress(heavy loads) while gaming or doing other complex tasks.

This plating also allows heat dissipation as air flows in your computer case. The little fins on the top supposedly help with that as well but it's as much about style and looking good as it is cooling.

A cool RAM component will perform faster and be less likely to wear/crack as it heats up because it doesn't get as hot.



Now RAM chips are much the same as processor chips so the architecture/design that goes into making them can also impact how they perform. I can't tell you much here because traditionally those are manufacturer trade secrets.

So we move onto CAS Latency. Which is exactly what it sounds like. It's latency. This latency represents the time delay between when the message is received by the memory(RAM) and how long before it responds to the message it received. In other words how fast it processes that information.

Ideally you want a stick of RAM with a CAS Latency of 9 or less. You'll often see a series of numbers along with it like "Timing: 9-9-9-24-2N."  RAM sort of works like a spreadsheet and those numbers basically represent how fast information is transferred from cell to cell within the spreadsheet. So the lower the number the faster the RAM is.

This is an example of good RAM for gaming with:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231536
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7D-8GBXM
    DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
    Timing 7-8-8-24
    Cas Latency 7

    Voltage 1.5V

So in that example...

G.Skill - is the name of the company.
Ripjaws X Series - is the name of the RAM (like the Mustang in Ford Mustang)
8GB (2 x 4GB) - tells you how much and that there is 2 sticks of it at 4 GB per stick. ((This is a good amount.))
240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) - Tells you basically what type of RAM it is and this is the part that you compare to your Motherboard to make sure your motherboard choice will work with this RAM and vice versa.
- The rest of it is specific model numbers and stuff. It doesn't mean anything for the consumer.

Basically you can't go wrong with any RAM of DDR3 1333 or 1600. I prefer the cooling, the look, the price, and the reliability of G.Skill.

For more detailed explanation of RAM timings and CAS you can look this multiple page article over:  http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Understanding-RAM-Timings/26



Now there's one more topic to briefly skim over here... Dual Channel Vs Triple Channel.

Basically these sticks of RAM are designed to perform optimally when grouped together as 2 sticks (dual ch.) or 3 sticks (triple ch.).

It will say on motherboard it if it's "triple channel" usually(Nehalem type) but those are rarer and far more expensive.

I suggest going with a dual channel (2 stick) memory kits because they will work with most board types.

Triple channel is better then Dual but if you buy more RAM in Dual Channel it's always better then a little less in triple.

Just make sure that your mother board has enough slots/sockets to stick them into.

As for how it works, it's basically the difference between you're processor using a spread sheet with 2 columns or 3 columns. The more columns it has access to the more information it can pump into it. AT this stage though the cost for 3 ch. is to excessive for the little difference it makes.



The conclusion is more RAM is always better but 8GB DDR3 1333 (or 1600) is enough for any current gen game running at full Ultra settings. When picking RAM, a lower CAS Latency and timing numbers are better choices.

So when you make your decision check out the motherboard and make sure that it has some room for expansion. Often you'll see it say something like "Maximum Memory supported 16 GB or 32 GB." You want at least 16 GB for future expansion.



RAM Memory is actually one of the least important things to think about when picking computer components. If you focus on Processor and Motherboard then the RAM can always be upgraded later. It's the cheapest and easiest part on a computer to replace. Just make sure the motherboard supports some faster RAM and has space for more sticks of it in the future. Feel free to buy cheap now then later on you can go with fancy expensive RAM and swap it out.

« Last Edit: June 14, 2013, 05:07:27 PM by Moraline »

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2013, 05:34:53 PM »
Ah, see now I get it. Let's see...

Quote
For a processor, I'd go with an 8 Core because for the next couple years that will most likely remain the standard even as new lines come out. Generally that means for Intel Processors you want to go with an I7 (socket LGA 1155 or 2011), and AMD FX 8___ or A8(or higher) - (Sockets AM3+, FM1, or FM2). The A series AMD processors actually have a built in graphics chip set that I haven't entirely wrapped my head around yet but they will act as a dual graphics processor when used with another AMD graphics card or can be used as a standalone graphics processor. Processors with larger amounts of L2/L3 cache perform better.

I know AMD and since its stability I'm after I think I'll go with the Intel Nvidia. Explain those numbers, letter, and initials please. 

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2013, 06:02:29 PM »
An LGA socket is where the CPU (Central Processing Unit) plugs into the motherboard.  I'm not sure if it's a proprietary Intel thing, but it stands for 'Land Grid Array'. 

Offline SakamotoHD

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2013, 07:47:13 PM »
It's just variations in different physical make-ups for your CPU-Plug-in So your motherboard may only have 1155LGA sockets, but you have an i7 that's for 2011 socket

that's basically saying "I want to put a circle in this square block". It doesn't "fit".

Cache memory is a high speed memory kept in between processor and RAM to increase the data execution speed. The number simply tells you the level.



Offline Moraline

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2013, 08:29:07 PM »
An LGA socket is where the CPU (Central Processing Unit) plugs into the motherboard.  I'm not sure if it's a proprietary Intel thing, but it stands for 'Land Grid Array'.
Yes, LGA is an Intel thing. The LGA socket goes with Intel processors.



Most of the discussion about processors actually centres around the motherboard. Again the motherboard is your primary factor when doing a computer build. It will dictate what everything else being plugged into it will be and how they are limited.



In my opinion it's a waste of money to buy an Intel Processor. They are much more expensive for very little added value plus you end up spending more on a motherboard needlessly. However, it's what you want so I'll continue...



The I7 is the powerhouse of the Intel processors. There are several brands with differing designs (what they call "bridges." - Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge, etc..)

To explain the numbers it's simple. As Oniya said the numbers LGA 1155 are name for a socket that the CPU processor plugs into on the motherboard. The LGA 1155 is a socket that Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge processors will plug into.



The newer standard is the LGA 1150 which supports processors that are labelled with Haswell or Broadwell instead of the Ivy or Sandy. (There is no significant difference between an Ivy Bridge and a Haswell other then the type of socket it plugs into.)

Sample (Ivy Bridge):
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116502
Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770
    Series: Core i7
    L2 Cache: 4 x 256KB
    L3 Cache: 8MB


Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge - This is the name of the processor type. Like "Ford Mustang."
3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo)  - This is the processing power. Higher numbers are good.
LGA 1155  - Type of socket it will plug into on the motherboard.
The rest is just general blah blah info and model number. (As a note - this Quad core will perform as fast and on as complicated processes as a similar AMD 8 Core processor. But the AMD will probably be cheaper to buy.)

    L2 Cache: 4 x 256KB
    L3 Cache: 8MB


When looking at CPU processors the L2/L3 cache thing is like a mini memory module for the processor itself. It basically defines how big the data pipe is that the processor can squeeze information through. Larger cache means more data can be squeezed out and sent off. It's a bit like asking how big a piece of paper the guy the calculator needs to get all his rough work done.

It's really not worth paying much attention to unless you are really trying to Min/Max your computer. IE: squeeze out every drop you can in performance but then you'll start getting into overclocking stuff. (That's where you change the programming to make the component go faster then it was designed to do by adding a little extra electricity into the mix.)

It's just variations in different physical make-ups for your CPU-Plug-in So your motherboard may only have 1155LGA sockets, but you have an i7 that's for 2011 socket

that's basically saying "I want to put a circle in this square block". It doesn't "fit".

Cache memory is a high speed memory kept in between processor and RAM to increase the data execution speed. The number simply tells you the level.
That's a short way to sum it up.

I would add to that as my summary that you'll want to go with the I7 Ivy Bridge design for it's performance. The Haswell is a tiny step up from it but not worth the extra cost.

And going back to the beginning.. It's more about the motherboard choice then anything else as it effects the rest of the computer build.

This is a good board example and built for an I7 Ivy Bridge CPU processor
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157294
ASRock Z77 Extreme4-M LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
    LGA 1155
    Intel Z77
    4240pin DDR3 2800+(OC)/2400(OC)/2133(OC)/1866(OC)/1600/1333/1066

LGA 1155 - Is the socket type so it goes with the I7 Ivy Bridge that I linked already.
Intel Z77 - represents a type of chipset that's built into the motherboard. It's those little chips you see all over it. It means little mostly but there are some minor compatibility issues with differing components to go along with that. It's mostly very minor.
4240pin DDR3 - and it's accompanying numbers tell you the types of RAM that you can plug into it. You can see /1600/ so it would go with the RAM that I had in my previous post. The 4x at the front tells you that it will take 4 sticks of RAM.

Basically the numbers attached to the board define what matching numbers on different components (CPU or RAM) that will fit onto it, etc..
« Last Edit: June 14, 2013, 08:30:40 PM by Moraline »

Offline Nessy

Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2013, 09:25:08 PM »
When I started doing computers, I used a guides like these:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/step--step_guide_how_build_gaming_pc_amds_bulldozer_cpu

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/how-tos/how_build_small_gaming_pc

researching newer parts of course.

Intel processors are where they are at. All AMD get blown out of the water right now by them. There is always a matter of price for performance though and if you're really strapped, you can go AMD. I am not intel loyal. Two builds before My current build was a AMD, but AMD is not even in the running these days.

RAM is a little on the high side right now, but you don't want to go below 8GB. I would also spring for an SSD of some size if you can manage, 128 for the OS, 250-56 for the OS and some performance on software like games. at Least one a one TB for storage.

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Re: Crash Course in Computer Anatomy (The Whats and Why of making a PC)
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2013, 06:57:00 AM »
I also need to make this desktop wireless capable. What would you people recommend. I know it wouldn't be difficult to get all the apparatuses to provide my computer all the hardline connections it'll need, but with so much of PC gaming going to things like Steam I'm going to have to get with the times...

And hopefully, I'll move a place with some decent internet options. :\