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Author Topic: religion and mythology.  (Read 3690 times)

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Offline TamhansenTopic starter

Re: religion and mythology.
« Reply #100 on: October 13, 2012, 03:31:40 PM »
"Religion and Mythology"

Obviously, I am qualified to speak only for myself.

I think the tendency to get up in arms about the two lies not in denotation but in connotation. 'Mythology' tends to be associated with 'false' in a way 'religion' isn't. I am Christian. Personally, I don't object to Christianity being referred to as a mythology because I know that 'mythology' and 'false' are not synonyms. (For that matter, I'm not going to get up in arms with people telling me my faith is 'false', I just don't agree with them.)

Meanwhile, living in a secular world--it does irritate me when Muslims or Wiccans or practitioners of whatever faith are denied the rights and privileges that I as a Christian enjoy.

I am really glad to hear such a viewpoint. Even though i believe many Christians share it, I seldom hear or see it expressed. And indeed. Myth has somehow become synonymous with fairy tales in modern days, which is why I placed the definition in the first post. the bible is Christian mythology, while the practices of Christian congregations are it's religion. I think that that would be the best way to phrase my viewpoint.

Offline Beguile's Mistress

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Re: religion and mythology.
« Reply #101 on: October 13, 2012, 03:32:44 PM »
What happens when you tell a child that Santa Clause isn't real? They freak out. Why? Because they believe that Santa will give them toys if they are good. No Santa means no toys. A child will just kick and cry over the loss of their Santa, while an adult will terrorize and force people to believe, rape women, and blow up buildings.

If you allow the child to come the realization independently and answer their question about the existence of Santa with the question "What do you think?" a dialogue can develope where the idea of Santa isn't destroyed but morphed into a philosophy of giving.  Children being the instinctively clever little beings they are come to the conclusion that parents are Santa. 

I was taught a concept of Santa being a feeling that I can hold onto that lets me see need and try to fulfill it.  I still like to imagine the North Pole and elves but I relish the ability and opportunities to be the Santa for someone when I can.  The myth can become the religion that way.

Offline Oniya

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Re: religion and mythology.
« Reply #102 on: October 13, 2012, 04:03:40 PM »
If you allow the child to come the realization independently and answer their question about the existence of Santa with the question "What do you think?" a dialogue can develope where the idea of Santa isn't destroyed but morphed into a philosophy of giving.  Children being the instinctively clever little beings they are come to the conclusion that parents are Santa. 

I was taught a concept of Santa being a feeling that I can hold onto that lets me see need and try to fulfill it.  I still like to imagine the North Pole and elves but I relish the ability and opportunities to be the Santa for someone when I can.  The myth can become the religion that way.

I'm a big fan of the 'Yes, Virginia' letter, myself.

Offline Ironwolf85

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Re: religion and mythology.
« Reply #103 on: October 13, 2012, 06:39:34 PM »
If you allow the child to come the realization independently and answer their question about the existence of Santa with the question "What do you think?" a dialogue can develope where the idea of Santa isn't destroyed but morphed into a philosophy of giving.  Children being the instinctively clever little beings they are come to the conclusion that parents are Santa. 

I was taught a concept of Santa being a feeling that I can hold onto that lets me see need and try to fulfill it.  I still like to imagine the North Pole and elves but I relish the ability and opportunities to be the Santa for someone when I can.  The myth can become the religion that way.

I like this, and it illustrates the relationship pretty well.

Offline Pumpkin Seeds

Re: religion and mythology.
« Reply #104 on: October 13, 2012, 06:40:52 PM »
I agree.  That was a touching way to put the concept Beguile.