You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 03, 2016, 04:05:28 PM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: Greek Mythology In The New Age[MXM]  (Read 407 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline undisclosedtoyouTopic starter

  • .::.Day Dreamer.::. .::.E's Panty Inspector.::.
  • Lady
  • Addict
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2008
  • Location: San Diego, California
  • Gender: Female
  • Nemo me impune lacessit
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 2
Greek Mythology In The New Age[MXM]
« on: March 08, 2012, 01:57:25 AM »
Greek Mythology In The New Age

Note that this interest thread is to advertise for one on one's that center around the Greek Mythologies, specifically Greek mythologies involving everything from love, lust, friendship, trust, betrayal, pride and humility between two main characters that are male.  The inspiration for this interest thread stems from this site, which will be used often for both inspiration and information purposes.  This act's as an interest thread for a group game, but it'll be made up of one on one's that are all contained in the same basic universe.  From time to time opportunities for interaction between everyone will be provided, but for the most part the direction these stories are headed in is up to the players.

Suggestions for other pairings are encouraged, even MxF and FXF.

The Universe

The age for the great pantheon of the Greek Gods had come and gone; and their followers dwindled down to a very few.  And so with the disappearance of their faithful, and the large numbers of temples dedicated to them, so did to the Gods themselves disappear; Leaving them neither dead nor alive, but resting dormant atop Mount Olympus, shrouded in a mysterious fog that blanketing them in it's   seductive embrace. 

But as time passes, the fog thins, and those jailed in it's depths start to wake.  Rumbling out of their slumber, the Gods awaken, to find themselves alone and without their faithful followers to warm their blood and feed their ego's.  Already bored with the state of world, they, one by one, travel down to the world of man impregnating it's women, playing with mortal minds, and taking on their shape for sport.

But even the gods are not without their ghostly specters from the past, and one by one, they are plagued with flashes of their lovers from the past, doomed or fated to come face to face with their greatest of loves, that were once thought lost forever.  Unbeknownst to even the Gods themselves, this is their chance to regain what they have lost, to recapture the glory they once had, and reclaim their lovers from ages past.

Zeus and Ganymede

The Myth of Zeus and Ganymede
Erichthonius, the first to ever harness four horses to a chariot, was the richest of mortal men. He had a son named Tros, lord of the Trojans, and to him in turn were born three unblemished boys: Ilus founder of Ilium, Assaracus, and god-like Ganymede – the handsomest ever born of the human race. Tros loved Ganymede from the bottom of his heart and set guardians and tutors to watch over him as he wrestled, or rode to the hounds, or swam through the crashing, dragging breakers of the warm Mediterranean.

One day, looking down from his throne on Mount Olympus, Zeus spied Ganymede up in the meadows of Mount Ida, chilling with his friends under the watchful gaze of his aged tutors. Instantly, the King of Heaven flamed with love for the young Trojan’s thighs. Zeus shook himself once and turned into a powerful eagle. Straightaway he swooped down upon the world of men. Casting shafts of lightning every which way, he whipped up a fierce tempest turning day into night. Under cover of the storm the majestic eagle pounced and tenderly seized the boy in his talons. The aged guardians reached out to stop him, the hounds barked madly. Paying them no heed, the god and the boy rose up higher and higher and vanished into the blue.

In the blink of an eye the two arrived in Olympus. The eagle folded his wings, shook himself once and turned back into a god. He took Ganymede to bed and then appointed him cup bearer. But to make room for him, Zeus had to chase away Hebe, Hera's daughter and his, who served the drinks at the divine feasts. Clumsy, he called her, claiming she once stumbled. Hera saw it all and went insane with rage and jealousy.

All the other gods rejoiced to have Ganymede among them, for his beauty filled them with delight. And Ganymede thought pouring nectar to the immortals was mad cool, and when he filled his lover’s cup he made sure to press his lips to it first, giving it half a twist as he placed it in Zeus’ hand.

Back on Earth, Tros' heart was filled with cruel sorrow, not knowing where the divine tempest had taken his son. He cried endless tears. Even Zeus was moved by his pain. He sent down Hermes as messenger, who let Tros know his boy was now among the gods, immortal and forever young. Zeus gave Tros in exchange for his son a pair of white prancing mares, deathless and able to walk on water, the very same that carry the immortals. Tros’ heart was filled with joy and he drove his new horses as fast as the wind.

Hera, besides herself, vented her rage by destroying the Trojans. But Zeus, grateful for Ganymede’s love, made a place for him among the stars as Aquarius – the Water Bearer. There he still stands, smiling, pouring nectar and shielded to this day by the wing of the Eagle constellation.

Title: The Cup Bearer to The King
Content Level: [Light] or [Bon]
Character Wanted: The reincarnation of Ganymede
Summer:  Zeus, the forever playboy is having the time of his life, flitting from one new love to another, exploring the pleasures that the world has to offer in this new age of technology.  But out of all the forms he has taken since waking up, it's that of college man, Matt King that he has found the most pleasure.  In the atmosphere of academia surrounded by crowds of pulsating, near frantic youths having the time of their lives partying and exploring themselves with abandon, the fun loving king of the gods has found his place. 

But in between meddling with human affairs, and partaking in them himself, he's found something else to take hold in his obsessive mind.  He's been plagued with the image of his beautiful Ganymede, only he no longer goes by the name of Ganymede, and is apparently a student majoring in something called Global Governance.  So not only will Zeus have to find a way to woo his forever lover, but he'll also have to figure out what Global Governance means, and why his beautiful boy has the lofty ambition to take over the world.



Poseidon and Pelops

The Myth of Poseidon and Pelops
Tantalus, the king of Sipylus - the first city built by man - was a son of Zeus and also a great friend of his. The king of the gods confided many secrets in him, and often invited him up to Mount Olympus at banquet time, to partake of divine nectar and ambrosia. Tantalus however, swollen with pride, betrayed Zeus' trust, revealing his secrets and stealing Olympian food for his mortal friends to taste. One time, having invited the gods to a feast in his home and wanting to serve only the very best, he had his son, Pelops, whose name means "Muddy Face," cut into pieces and boiled, without a word to the mother, Dione. The gods did not touch their food, all except Demeter, who was so distracted by the recent loss of Persephone, her daughter, that she bit into the shoulder - the cut of honor - on her plate. For his crimes Tantalus' kingdom was laid waste. He died by Zeus's own hand and was cast into Tartarus, the deepest pit of Hades, for eternal torment, doomed amidst plenty to suffer hunger and thirst.

Having punished the father, Zeus set upon the task of restoring the son to life. He ordered Hermes to gather all the pieces, and to return them to the cauldron, upon which he laid a spell. There they were set to boil again, and the Fate Klotho joined the pieces back together. Demeter replaced the shoulder she had eaten with one made of the purest ivory. This mark - of the white shoulder - in years to come was to mark all the descendants of Pelops. Rhea, the mother of all the gods, breathed new life into him as Pan was dancing a dance of joy around the fire.

Pelops rose renewed from the pure cauldron, and though he had been handsome before, his beauty was now beyond compare. Poseidon, the god of the seas, saw the radiant boy and instantly fell in love. His heart broken by desire, he ran after the lad, lifted him into his chariot drawn by golden horses, and took him up to Mount Olympus. Dione, his mother, in vain sent men through Sipylus to search for him, for they found no trace of the boy. Up on Mount Olympus Poseidon appointed Pelops to be his cup-bearer and lover. He fed the youth on ambrosia, taught him to drive his magic chariot and would have kept him there forever, but the other gods, still smarting over the experience with the father, banished Pelops back to earth. Poseidon sadly parted from his friend, but not before heaping great treasure upon him.

Later, when the first beard began to darken his cheeks, Pelops fell in love with the enchanting Hippodameia, daughter of King Oenomaus of Pisa. Her father however had been warned by an oracle that he would meet his death at the hands of his son in law. Oenomaus had decreed

That whoever wanted to win her hand had to beat him in a chariot race or lose his life. He had no fear of losing: His mares were the fastest in all of Greece, divine horses given to him by his father, Ares, the god of war, and his charioteer, Myrtilus, was a son of Hermes and a horseman without compare. Twelve brave princes had already come as suitors, only to perish under his bronze lance. Pelops, no mean driver of horses himself, having learned the skill from a god, took no chances. He went down to the sea shore, and called on his old lover and teacher for assistance: "Listen, Poseidon, if you had any pleasure in our love, Aphrodite's sweet gift, block the brazen spear of Oenomaus, and grant that my chariot will be the speedier one. It is for me to risk my life, and for you to help me win."

The god, glad to help, gave him a golden chariot that could roll over the ocean waves without getting wet, drawn by a team of winged horses, tireless and immortal. Back at the palace, Pelops, still worried about the race, bribed Myrtilus, promising him the first night with Hippodameia. Myrtilus, who secretly loved Hippodameia, sabotaged the king's chariot. When the race began Pelops took off like an arrow. King Oenomaus, with Myrtilus at the reins, raced madly after him, but just as he drew close and was about to run Pelops through with his spear and rip out his life, the wheels of his chariot flew off, his chariot broke into pieces, and he, tangled in the reins, was dragged to death by his own horses. Thus Pelops won Hippodameia's hand, and with it the throne of Pisa. But he no longer had any need of Myrtilus and murdered him before the bargain could be fulfilled. Pelops and Hippodameia had many children, and Pelops fathered yet another with the nymph Astyoche, a bastard son named Chrysippus, but the curse of Myrtilus was upon all their heads and Hermes saw to it that it would be accomplished.

To atone for the death of Oenomaus, Pelops founded a great festival to be held every four years in the king's honor, named the Olympic Games. Later, Herakles (who was Pelops' great-grandson) decreed that Pelops was the one to be honored, and that sacrifices to him should take place even before those to father Zeus.

Pelops was a great king, and all of western Greece was named after him. Even today we call that land "Pelops' Island" - Peloponessus.

Title:
Content Level:
Characters Wanted: Poseidon and the reincarnation of Pelops
Summer:


Apollo and Hyacinth

The Myth of Apollo and Hyacinth
Hyacinth, the young son of the King of Sparta, beautiful like the very gods of Mount Olympus, was beloved of Apollo, shooter of arrows. The god often came down to the shores of the Eurotas River, leaving his shrine in Delphi unattended, to spend time with his young friend and delight in boyish pleasures. Tired of his music and his long bow, Apollo found relief in rustic pastimes. He would take Hyacinth hunting through the woods and glades on the mountain sides, or they would practice gymnastics, a skill which Hyacinth then taught to his friends, and for which later the Spartans would become renowned. The simple life awoke Apollo's appetites, and made the curly-haired boy seem more charming than ever. Apollo gave him all his love, forgetting he was a mere mortal.

Once, in the heat of a summer afternoon, the lovers stripped naked, sleeked themselves with olive oil, and tried their hand at discus throw, each vying to outdo the other. The bronze discus flew higher and higher. Finally, the powerful god gathered all his strength, and spun and wheeled and let fly the shiny disk which rose swift as a bird, cutting the clouds in two. Then, glittering like a star, it began to tumble down.

Hyacinth ran to meet it. He was hurrying to take his turn, to prove to Apollo that he, though young, was no less able than the god at this sport. The discus landed, but having fallen from such a great height it bounced and violently struck Hyacinth in the head. He let out a groan and crumpled to the ground. The blood spurted thickly from his wound, coloring crimson the black hair of the handsome youth.

Horrified, Apollo raced over. He bent over his friend, raised him up, rested the boy's head on his knees, trying desperately to staunch the blood flowing from the wound. But it was all in vain. Hyacinth grew paler and paler. His eyes, always so clear, lost their gleam and his head rolled to one side, just like a flower of the field wilting under the pitiless rays of the noonday sun. Heartbroken, Apollo cried out: "Death has taken you in his claws, beloved friend! Woe, for by my own hand you have died. And yet its crime was meeting yours at play. Was that a crime? Or was my love to blame - the guilt that follows love that loves too much? Oh, if only I could pay for my deed by joining you in your journey to the cheerless realms of the dead. Oh, why am I cursed to live forever? Why can't I follow you?"

Apollo held his dying friend close to his breast, and his tears fell in a stream onto the boy's bloody hair. Hyacinth died, and his soul flew to the kingdom of Hades. The god bent close to the dead boy's ear, and softly whispered: "In my heart you will live forever, beautiful Hyacinth. May your memory live always among men as well." And lo, at a word from Apollo, a fragrant red flower rose from Hyacinth's blood. We call it hyacinth, and on its petals you can still read the letters "Ay," the sigh of pain that rose from Apollo's breast.

And the memory of Hyacinth lived on among the gentlemen of Sparta, who gave honors to their son, and celebrated him for three days in mid-summer at the Hyakinthaea festival. The first day they would mourn his death, and the last two they would celebrate his ressurection.

Title:
Content Level:
Characters Wanted: Apollo and the reincarnation of Hyacinth
Summer:





List of Characters/Pairings
The taken characters are in black and the available ones in navy.

Zeus and the reincarnation of Ganymede
Poseidon and the reincarnation of Pelops
Apollo and the reincarnation of Hyacinth


« Last Edit: March 08, 2012, 02:08:32 PM by undisclosedtoyou »

Offline rustytiger

Re: Greek Mythology In The New Age[MXM]
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2012, 06:57:04 PM »
Hi interested in the Ganymede position.

Offline undisclosedtoyouTopic starter

  • .::.Day Dreamer.::. .::.E's Panty Inspector.::.
  • Lady
  • Addict
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2008
  • Location: San Diego, California
  • Gender: Female
  • Nemo me impune lacessit
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 2
Re: Greek Mythology In The New Age[MXM]
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2012, 03:58:53 PM »
Wonderful :)

I'll put up a character sheet soon.