You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 09, 2016, 09:17:56 PM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: Medical Tattoos  (Read 2311 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Fae BrinTopic starter

  • Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass. -Anton Chekhov
  • Deverified
  • Seducer
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2010
  • Gender: Female
  • convince me. persuade me. seduce me. parade me.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 1
Medical Tattoos
« on: February 29, 2012, 03:26:23 PM »
I came across this article and I thought it was really interesting.

Medical Tattoos

I'd like to know alternate perspectives to mine on the subject, if I could be indulged.

Offline Trieste

  • Faerie Queen; Her Imperial Lubemajesty; Willing Victim
  • Dame
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Apr 2005
  • Location: In the middle of Happily Ever After with a dark Prince Charming.
  • Gender: Female
  • I am many things - dull is not one of them.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 4
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2012, 03:37:21 PM »
Tattoos have been used in medicine for years to improve the precision of radiation treatments. This seems to be an extension of that, and not a big deal.

Offline Envious

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2012, 05:01:41 PM »
Unless the EMT is looking for it, and knows its purpose, it's not going to be taken into account. Doesn't seem like a bad idea other than that, though.

Offline SilentScreams

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2012, 05:13:45 PM »
I like the idea, in general. But Envious is right, unless it's a tattoo that states something that can wait for the hospital before it's discovered an EMT might not find it. I'm allergic to penicillin. Would I get that tattooed on me? Probably not. It's a depressingly small step from a good voluntary idea to a compulsory government program. 

Offline Trieste

  • Faerie Queen; Her Imperial Lubemajesty; Willing Victim
  • Dame
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Apr 2005
  • Location: In the middle of Happily Ever After with a dark Prince Charming.
  • Gender: Female
  • I am many things - dull is not one of them.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 4
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2012, 06:51:32 PM »
Kind of, but the logic doesn't wash. Medical alert bracelets remain voluntary, and I expect that government-mandated tattoos are a little too WWII to be anything but political suicide.

Besides, they're too busy legislating uteri. >.>

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2012, 06:57:21 PM »
It's an alternative. I think some sort of 'format' might be useful. It could be a very good option. but only an option.

Offline DarklingAlice

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2012, 08:15:03 PM »
I really really like that idea. Though more for things like medication allergies than for end of life wishes. The more information paramedics and ER doctors have, the better; and with a tattoo there is no risk of losing it (well...under a certain severity of accident I suppose).

Offline Revolverman

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2012, 08:19:03 PM »
I see the logic of it, but It would have to be really large to be reconised right away, and lord knows what happens when you get older.

Offline Serephino

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 03:10:25 AM »
It's an interesting idea.  There would have to be a designated place for them though, so medical personnel would know where to look, and maybe designated symbols instead of words.  You can't lose a tattoo like you can a bracelet.   

Offline Saffron

  • ღ Your Designer Drug ღ Myobi's Hither and Thither Girl ღ
  • Dame
  • Addict
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2008
  • Location: ღ I would have you, right here on this desk, until you begged for mercy twice. ღ
  • Gender: Female
  • ღ Twice. ღ
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 6
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2012, 07:08:22 AM »
I remember reading an article a year or two ago about a woman with dextrocardia (her heart was on the opposite side to normal) getting a tattoo to the effect of "I have dextrocardia. My heart is on the right side." on her left so that anyone who needed to give her medical attention in the case of her being unconscious would be aware of her condition.

I think they are a really great idea for identifying life long conditions. I'm not so sure about DNR notices or No CPR notices, but for making conditions apparent I think they're great. Much better than a bracelet, which can easily be lost or forgotten.

Online Valerian

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2012, 11:14:51 AM »
Luckily, I don't have a condition or allergy that requires a medical alert bracelet, but if I did, actually wearing such a bracelet wouldn't be an option for me.  I'm allergic to most metals -- they make me break out in a terrible rash -- so in my case I'd either have to figure out how to get a sterling silver bracelet made, or get the tattoo.  Mind you, I wouldn't like a tattoo at all, but better that than the hospital finding out the hard way that I have a fatal allergy to some medication when I'm unable to tell them.

Offline Caela

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2012, 11:30:32 AM »
I think it's an interesting option. It would be especially useful for people that break their jewelery often or people, like one of my brothers, who have skin allergies to most metals. The kid actually got special permission to hook his dog tags to his clothing instead of wearing them around his neck because the metal caused him to break out so badly, he'd never be able to wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace if he needed one. Thankfully he doesn't but I am sure there are others with the same sort of allergy that do.

I would agree that the medical community should make an attempt to get on top of this though and come up with recommendations for placement and what sort of information to include and will be honored. "NO CPR" on your chest sounds like good placement, but there is no saying that someone starting CPR will open your shirt to see it. It may not get opened until someone with training on a defibrillator cuts it open to place pads. I would think somewhere on your arm would be the best choice, easily seen in many shirts and long sleeves are easy to push up to check for them quickly.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2012, 12:26:13 PM »
Luckily, I don't have a condition or allergy that requires a medical alert bracelet, but if I did, actually wearing such a bracelet wouldn't be an option for me.  I'm allergic to most metals -- they make me break out in a terrible rash -- so in my case I'd either have to figure out how to get a sterling silver bracelet made, or get the tattoo.  Mind you, I wouldn't like a tattoo at all, but better that than the hospital finding out the hard way that I have a fatal allergy to some medication when I'm unable to tell them.

Medic-Alert makes both a sterling silver and one with a leather band (the engraved charm is attached to the outside of the band with lobster clasps - there might be a small amount of the buckle that touches the skin, though.)  Edit - they also make a sports-band style that has a plastic buckle.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 12:28:26 PM by Oniya »

Offline Gracefulskai

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2012, 01:18:34 PM »
A good friend of mine has a tattoo on his right forearm stating that he's a Type 1 Diabetic. You couldn't miss the medical symbol, it just drew your eyes. If he ever clasped someone would surely notice that tattoo. I think that, maybe not a 'have to have one' sort of thing, but just like the bracelets, voluntary. Getting a tattoo is a painful process for some people. It'd be better if the EMT's were aware that some people might have a tattoo. If anything should mandatory, it should be that the tattoo is visible, like on the forearm or somewhere that the EMT's don't have to take more than a second to look at it.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2012, 01:39:55 PM »
As I have a sister who is an EMT, I've just dropped her an email asking her what she thinks of the idea.  Who knows, maybe she'll come back with a story about how she's seen this in practice.

Offline Zakharra

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2012, 05:19:33 PM »
  I just had the weird thought of what would people think if they saw these people in swimsuits (assuming they are young enough to wear them and look ok) or somewhat revealing clothes and they could see the 'DNR' tattoo, or some other condition (allergies or some such) stenciled across or on the chest/shoulder.  If they do tattoos like this, they will have to take that into account.

Offline DarklingAlice

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2012, 11:59:21 PM »
As far as placement goes I like the idea of the wrist. It's already associated with medical bracelets and small writs tattoos could be fairly innocuous. I also think that instead of the actual words like: 'penicillin allergy' or 'DNR' there should be a universal symbol library adopted to ensure no confusion of meaning. Something like an NFPA code for common medical problems.

Offline Serephino

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2012, 01:05:50 AM »
That's why I said it should be some kind of symbol.  I'm allergic to penicillin, but I'm not sure I'd want to advertise that.  My boyfriend definitely wouldn't want the whole world knowing about his heart condition.  With official symbols, the person who has it will know what it means, and medical personnel will know what it means, but the average person won't.  I wouldn't make it mandatory, but it's a good option.

I wouldn't reccomend it for DNR orders though.  Getting rid of a tattoo isn't easy if you change your mind.

Offline Zakharra

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2012, 01:19:34 PM »
That's why I said it should be some kind of symbol.  I'm allergic to penicillin, but I'm not sure I'd want to advertise that.  My boyfriend definitely wouldn't want the whole world knowing about his heart condition.  With official symbols, the person who has it will know what it means, and medical personnel will know what it means, but the average person won't.  I wouldn't make it mandatory, but it's a good option.

I wouldn't reccomend it for DNR orders though.  Getting rid of a tattoo isn't easy if you change your mind.


 Five minutes after the list is released, it would be splashed all over the internet. People would get to know what it means fairly quick.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2012, 02:18:44 PM »
Okay - word from the field is that
a) If it's not on the left wrist, it's not likely to be seen (that's the arm that is used for starting IVs).  It's likely to be by accident, though - they look for the bracelet.  Tattoos might be better observed in the hospital when they remove the clothing to get the patient into a gown. 
b) She's seen a 'No CPR' on an 80-yr-old's chest - tattoos on 80-yr-olds are fairly uncommon at the moment, so they draw the eye.  Thirty, forty years down the road - not so much.
c) The medications that are given in the field (pre-hospital) are not common allergens.  That said...
d) ID is searched for in the field - if you have a list of your allergens paper-clipped to your driver's license, they'd call that a good day.

Offline Pumpkin Seeds

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2012, 04:18:16 PM »
As far as I'm aware, we would not honor a "No CPR" or "No DNR" tattoo on a patient.  Too questionable.

Offline DarklingAlice

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2012, 05:42:54 PM »
Which is why, if this were to actually be used there would need to be a well, characterized standard system of symbols. Just like we already use in many other areas of science and medicine.

So, I get why a person might not want to advertise their stance on end of life issues on their skin, or even certain medical issues; however, I am not sure why anyone would shy away from certain information relevent to emergency medical procedures (e.g. allergies, blood sugar issues, etc).

Offline Pumpkin Seeds

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2012, 12:07:40 AM »
I don't see tattoos being a viable option because they simply cannot be changed on a regular basis. 

Offline Serephino

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2012, 01:52:37 AM »
Serious medical conditions don't usually change.  I'll probably be allergic to penicillin the rest of my life.  I think I'm mildly allergic to the anti-nausea stuff they give you before surgery.  It makes my whole body itch like crazy for a few minutes.   

Offline DarklingAlice

Re: Medical Tattoos
« Reply #24 on: March 03, 2012, 01:57:33 AM »
Serious medical conditions don't usually change.  I'll probably be allergic to penicillin the rest of my life.  I think I'm mildly allergic to the anti-nausea stuff they give you before surgery.  It makes my whole body itch like crazy for a few minutes.   


It is worth mentioning that allergies change, and that some allergies (especially amoxicillin) are often misdiagnosed. That said, tattoo removal procedures are only improving...so *shrugs*