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Author Topic: Personhood law could outlaw birth control  (Read 4509 times)

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Offline TheVillain

Re: Personhood law could outlaw birth control
« Reply #50 on: November 12, 2011, 09:39:34 AM »
We did too. Except it wasn't so much Sex Ed as a Biology Class section on Humans. 'The Miracle of Life' it was called, and part of it was watching a live birth.

The funny part is that the video was only shown in the more advanced science classes, so while our teen pregnancy rate was about average for a school our size there were NO pregnancies among girls with a GPA of at least 3.2, a requirement for getting into the class.

Offline Serephino

Re: Personhood law could outlaw birth control
« Reply #51 on: November 13, 2011, 01:36:07 AM »
I didn't have sex ed.  My high school health class was squished in with driver's ed.  Some days we'd learn about driving, others we had to pick a chapter in the health books, read it, and do the questions at the end to turn in.  I don't think the teacher even checked the answers. 

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Personhood law could outlaw birth control
« Reply #52 on: November 13, 2011, 01:57:31 AM »
We did too. Except it wasn't so much Sex Ed as a Biology Class section on Humans. 'The Miracle of Life' it was called, and part of it was watching a live birth.

The funny part is that the video was only shown in the more advanced science classes, so while our teen pregnancy rate was about average for a school our size there were NO pregnancies among girls with a GPA of at least 3.2, a requirement for getting into the class.

too bad that couldnt be used as evidence of it working. :D

I went to high school in the sand hills of South Carolina. I had one class mate who was a licenses preacher at 12 (forget the denomination) and we lost our drama department a year before I moved there. (Showing 'godless plays' like anything by William Shakespere I think)

Very weird place.

Sex Ed, at least in Marlboro County, was parent's responsibility.

There were a LOT of 'Winchester Weddings' my senior year.

Offline Lilias

Re: Personhood law could outlaw birth control
« Reply #53 on: November 13, 2011, 03:53:47 AM »
Kids in 1980s Greece didn't do sex ed either, but the nature of both the school system and society left little margin for fooling around. Perhaps half my class were virgins when we graduated. I never heard of a single pregnancy in my school or any other I got news from, at least not one that was not 'taken care of'. There may have been the odd abortion around, but never any bumps going about school, nor hasty weddings.

Offline Jagerin

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Re: Personhood law could outlaw birth control
« Reply #54 on: November 14, 2011, 07:08:21 PM »
Teen pregnancy was very rare in my high school. We had a sex ed class. It lasted a whole semester and we had to take it, and pass it, as a requirement to pass on to the next grade level. If you failed sex ed, you were held back a grade till you did pass it.

It was not an option for us and no one complained about it (at least no one I ever heard). We did have the occasional kid come in with special permission to opt out of the class due to whatever reasoning, but it was a requirement. In exchange for not taking sex ed, they had to take an extra semester of physical education (we had to have 7 to graduate, so they had to have 8).