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Author Topic: Anonymous v. Los Zetas  (Read 848 times)

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Offline FalanorTopic starter

Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« on: October 31, 2011, 10:10:50 PM »
Anonymous Veracruz copia

This got pretty damn real...

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2011, 10:23:13 PM »
Wow.. that could get truly evil.

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Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2011, 10:25:20 PM »
Well, damn...
This is different than hacking websites.

I guess we'll start to see if information is more powerful than a gun.

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2011, 10:28:26 PM »
I just hope those guys get their posts off clear, cause the Zetas wouldn't blink at hosing down an internet cafe or such. They are one of the nastier groups out there. They haven't posted bounties on the border patrol like MS-13,  but they are mean, tough and well armed.

Though, upon a quick recheck, they have threatened action against US Law Enforcement if they interferred with Zetas business. And they are quite possibly BETTER armed and trained than MS-13.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2011, 10:30:35 PM by Callie Del Noire »

Offline Zakharra

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2011, 01:45:00 AM »
Well, damn...
This is different than hacking websites.

I guess we'll start to see if information is more powerful than a gun.

 Either way, people are going to die. The Zetas are not afraid to kill whoever they need to. I can see the people, and very possibly their families,  Anon names suddenly vanishing or being murdered by the Zetas.

Offline Missy

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2011, 09:11:54 AM »
Does anyone mind translating the spanish to english for me? I'm curious.


In my opinion these guys are being stupid. I hate cartels and the like as much as anybody and wish the authorities would be more focused on taking them down. That said unless I'm with the authorities I really don't know how much effort they actually are putting into the cartels, largely owing to the level of undercover work and secrecy necessary to get the appropriate information to prosecute them. If the members of anonymous want to perform a service of justice to society they need to join the appropriate channels and offer their skills in that capacity. Vigilanteism is dangerous for you, me and everyone else.

Offline Zakharra

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2011, 12:42:25 PM »
 Considering the amount of disdain Anon and hackers in general have for authority, I highly doubt they would be willing to go through appropriate channels.

Offline Missy

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2011, 12:52:39 PM »
Doesn't mean they shouldn't. You have to have balance, if you adopt the extremes so heavily you lose a lot more than you gain.

Online Vekseid

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2011, 03:15:33 PM »
Does anyone mind translating the spanish to english for me? I'm curious.


In my opinion these guys are being stupid. I hate cartels and the like as much as anybody and wish the authorities would be more focused on taking them down. That said unless I'm with the authorities I really don't know how much effort they actually are putting into the cartels, largely owing to the level of undercover work and secrecy necessary to get the appropriate information to prosecute them. If the members of anonymous want to perform a service of justice to society they need to join the appropriate channels and offer their skills in that capacity. Vigilanteism is dangerous for you, me and everyone else.

The terms 'authority' and 'Latin America' do not always go in the same sentence. Mexico is in very, very sad shape as its oil fields are collapsing, depriving it of revenue.

Offline Aiden

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2011, 05:10:02 PM »
The article pretty much covered everything that was said of importance in the video save for some very heated threats and name calling.

I am kinda looking forward to what happens on November 5th.

Offline Missy

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2011, 05:41:20 PM »
The terms 'authority' and 'Latin America' do not always go in the same sentence. Mexico is in very, very sad shape as its oil fields are collapsing, depriving it of revenue.

I know a little bit since I used to live with a Mexican roommate. They're economy is in pretty bad shape and they're are in debt worse than anything I've ever heard of.

I know you can't really go to the authorities and expect them to do anything in some countries, but the thing is vigilanteism is still going to put you and a lot of other innocent people in harms way. We rely on our FBI and other bodies to perform their job because they're professionals who are trained, qualified and know what they're doing. The FBI and other authorities know how and are actively involved in minimizing the risk to themselves and others. These kids are just trying to do dangerous shit they know nothing about. If they can do what they say they're gonna do then they can put their skills to much better use working for the right people, instead of dangerously running about. Honestly, they're kind of scary, whatever side they say they're on.

If you wanna uphold the rules, do it by the rules, anything else is risky, at best.

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2011, 05:48:15 PM »
I know a little bit since I used to live with a Mexican roommate. They're economy is in pretty bad shape and they're are in debt worse than anything I've ever heard of.

I know you can't really go to the authorities and expect them to do anything in some countries, but the thing is vigilanteism is still going to put you and a lot of other innocent people in harms way. We rely on our FBI and other bodies to perform their job because they're professionals who are trained, qualified and know what they're doing. The FBI and other authorities know how and are actively involved in minimizing the risk to themselves and others. These kids are just trying to do dangerous shit they know nothing about. If they can do what they say they're gonna do then they can put their skills to much better use working for the right people, instead of dangerously running about. Honestly, they're kind of scary, whatever side they say they're on.

If you wanna uphold the rules, do it by the rules, anything else is risky, at best.

Thing is.. once upon a time.. that was the way things worked here in the US. Gangs ruled/ran chunks of the cities. New York City was full of sections of the city being run by this gang or that. The scope has grown today because of communication and transportation but the problems were there then. We didn't instantly come up with a clean and relatively corruption free society.. it too time and lots of blood spilled. Read through the papers set in the 1800s, particularly after the US Civil War.

This isnt' a new problem, these countries are where we were 100+ years ago. Reform, lasting and true, takes time and what happens in one place isn't always instantly transported to another. They need help and we can provide that.

Online Vekseid

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2011, 11:36:33 PM »
I know a little bit since I used to live with a Mexican roommate. They're economy is in pretty bad shape and they're are in debt worse than anything I've ever heard of.

I know you can't really go to the authorities and expect them to do anything in some countries, but the thing is vigilanteism is still going to put you and a lot of other innocent people in harms way. We rely on our FBI and other bodies to perform their job because they're professionals who are trained, qualified and know what they're doing. The FBI and other authorities know how and are actively involved in minimizing the risk to themselves and others. These kids are just trying to do dangerous shit they know nothing about. If they can do what they say they're gonna do then they can put their skills to much better use working for the right people, instead of dangerously running about. Honestly, they're kind of scary, whatever side they say they're on.

If you wanna uphold the rules, do it by the rules, anything else is risky, at best.

As Callie said, the rules we have in the US were paid for with blood. A lot of it. The US was honestly a lot better a century ago than much of Latin America is today. I am not sure why you are referring to the FBI in a thread about Mexico, for example. The Mexican version was the AFI, and you can look up how legitimate they are. In 2008, Rodolfo de la Guardia García was arrested for possibly leaking information to a drug cartel. They're the PFM now, but I can't imagine the problems have gotten better.

You want to trust them?

The rule in many places in Latin America is 'do you have guns'. You want protection from the 'police', you better make enough bribes to the right people. Though, in many cases, the amount of the bribe gift will be negotiable depending on how rich you are. In some cases, though, they simply can't be trusted, or just tell you to go take it back yourself. Which can be a problem if said other person is more well armed than you are.

You then have to find help, who are not the police, pay them appropriately, and if you don't want the other person killed, you have to specifically demand that.

I have first-hand accounts of this sort of crap, from family members, friends, and general acquaintances. You try going to the authorities in these areas for these sorts of problems, you better be pretty damned powerful.

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Anonymous v. Los Zetas
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2011, 12:04:16 AM »
The rule in many places in Latin America is 'do you have guns'. You want protection from the 'police', you better make enough bribes to the right people. Though, in many cases, the amount of the bribe gift will be negotiable depending on how rich you are. In some cases, though, they simply can't be trusted, or just tell you to go take it back yourself. Which can be a problem if said other person is more well armed than you are.

You then have to find help, who are not the police, pay them appropriately, and if you don't want the other person killed, you have to specifically demand that.

I have first-hand accounts of this sort of crap, from family members, friends, and general acquaintances. You try going to the authorities in these areas for these sorts of problems, you better be pretty damned powerful.

You know what we were told to do in Tijuana when I was in the military? You go down to TJ, the cops stop you for any reason, you pull out your wallet and they take the money. From there you take the twenty or two you stuck in your sock and headed back up to the border crossing and go back to base.

That was the way things got done in TJ. Most of the guys I know that got locked up by the cops, didn't have enough for the cop's liking or didn't 'play the game' as it was called.

In five years based in San Deigo, I knew only one guy who got busted for trying to bribe a cop. One. I know about forty who got let go after losing between forty and a hundred bucks.

After the BRILLIANT (sarcasm there) idea to change the on base drinking age to 21, we have literally dozens of guys get rolled every weekend, not bu crooks but the cops. Got to the point that my squadron's CO mandated a 3 person 'team' for trips to TJ and you had to request permission a week ahead of time. IN WRITING.