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Author Topic: Dungeons & Dragons  (Read 638 times)

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Offline EnviousTopic starter

Dungeons & Dragons
« on: October 07, 2011, 06:58:11 PM »

I don't know where to begin. How would you help someone completely new to the idea of D&D navigate?
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 09:54:07 PM by Envious »

Offline Kay Tana

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2011, 08:37:53 PM »
That really is hard to say. Its mostly a personal preference if you've never played any version.  To say it plain 4.0 is a really dumbed down and more narrowly aligned version of 3.5 with a few twists of its own. The magic users got hit the worst with the change over. If you are looking to play any kind of spellcaster I would definitely suggest 3.5. However as you said its discontinued. That doesn't mean the books aren't available just that they wont be printing any more of them. Of course you can still get the used and there is sure to be plenty still unsold somewhere near you or on the internet. The three main books you should focus on are The Dungeon Master's Guide, The Player's Handbook, and The Monster Manual. Once you have those three you're set the rest are basically expansions and campaign settings.

As for Pathfinder I have no experience with it, sorry.

Offline Aybara

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2011, 11:07:28 PM »
I can't comment on Pathfinder properly since I only just got the book in the last few weeks and haven't had an actual game of it yet but if you want to look at some of the stuff for it they have it online here:
http://www.d20pfsrd.com/
There is also a similar SRD for 3.5:
http://www.d20srd.org/index.htm

I prefer 3.5 over 4th personally but I have had some perfectly fun games in 4th Edition, it's a bit... how can I put this... board gamish but that can be fun too in it's own way, on the plus side it really does get you and the other players working together a lot as lone wolfing it in the game doesn't work out that well. If you have experience in rpgs 3.5 might be the way to go or specifically pathfinder because even though I haven't gotten a chance to play it I can tell you this from reading it, it's better laid out than 3.5 and they cut out a lot of the clunky rules. Another perk is that they made the base classes a viable option to take straight and buffed all the classes to varying degrees, fighter is a class that has something to it now other than "I've got lots of feats" and weapon specialisation, the they get extra bonuses to there ability to use weapons and armour dependent on fighter level.
Fourth edition if you aren't used to pen and paper RPGs might be a little easier to pick up.
I'd advise you to find out about any groups in your area, regardless of the system it'll be easier to pick up if someone is running the game and showing ye the rules at least initially. At the end of the day it's more about the story and having fun (or should be) but if given a choice between them I'd say 3.5, specifically pathfinder as I really do like what I've been reading in it so far... on the plus side for it too you can buy the rule book easily enough.

Offline CapeCodRPGER

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2011, 03:55:55 AM »
Pathfinder RPG Beginner Box Preview

There is an overview of the Pathfinder starter set that is due out by the end of the month. Pathfinder is basically 3.5 but tweaked. It has the same basic rules structure as 3.5.

4.0 is IMO very dumbed down. It has a starter set as well. 

Hope that helps.

Offline Tsenta

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2011, 08:02:38 AM »
In all honesty the best way to learn a game is to play it, usually players and DMs will be glad to run a little game for people new to the system so they can learn the basics. The systems vary from version to version. Pathfinder is basically 3.5 with a few tweaks. 4th edition is different almost entirely.  You'll find lots of people who prefer one system over another, mostly just because how it flows with them. Some find 3.5 too complex due to all the little things (grappling, tripping, falls, etc) where 4.0 some think is too simple.  Just try a few games of each thing then stick with what feels best to you.

Offline Cold Heritage

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2011, 12:43:06 PM »
I think 3.x and Pathfinder are too complex because it's a deliberate design choice of those games to make the power progression for spellcasters quadratic and the progression for non-spellcasters linear, how there are so many trap options that will punish you for selecting them, and how important it is to be conversant with all of the material to make a character that can fight against the types of monsters the game was designed to expect them to fight.

Offline meikle

Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2011, 01:43:19 PM »
I would recommend ignoring the opinion of anyone that uses hostile or demeaning language when talking about any of the games.  3.5, Pathfinder, and 4e all have their own pitfalls, and if you base your decision on the ideas of someone who has their nose stuck in the air while discussing them, you're not going to get especially useful information.

edit: or, if not ignoring, at least taking with a grain of salt; people who are emotionally invested in disliking something aren't going to give you a very fair assessment of that thing generally speaking.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2011, 04:45:30 PM by meikle »

Offline Oniya

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Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2011, 03:16:07 PM »
Also remember that an enthusiastic, cohesive group can make damn near any system playable.  A lackluster, divisive group can make even the best system fall apart.

Offline HairyHeretic

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Re: Dungeons & Dragons
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2011, 05:33:46 PM »
Agreed. If you're both new to system gaming in general, it might be easier to try and get playing with an existing group, to see how things work. Roleplaying is, to my mind, a social activity. Yes, you can do it with 2, but it's more fun with more. Most people I know feel a GM and about 5 players is optimal size ... enough for a lot of variety, but small enough that no one should get overlooked.