You are either not logged in or not registered with our community. Click here to register.
 
December 11, 2016, 02:17:38 AM

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Click here if you are having problems.
Default Wide Screen Beige Lilac Rainbow Black & Blue October Send us your theme!

Hark!  The Herald!
Holiday Issue 2016

Wiki Blogs Dicebot

Author Topic: Abiogenic petroleum origins  (Read 707 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TummyacheTopic starter

Abiogenic petroleum origins
« on: May 15, 2011, 12:23:51 PM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiogenic_petroleum_origin
http://www.rense.com/general54/ssust.htm

As friend introduced me to this concept last night. There are several theories, you can read about them on the Wiki page I provided, but apparently, deep oil fields are refilling. In a nut shell, it is the idea that Petroleum is not the result of petrified organic remains, but a by-product of Bacterial metabolism deep within the Earth.

Thoughts?

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 12:34:00 PM »
Abiogenic means 'creation from [something] not alive'.  If the oil is coming from bacterial metabolism - and they have created oil-producing algae in labs - then it is coming from a living source.  The only difference is that there isn't a multi-million-year time frame on it.  Until they culture those bacteria and demonstrate that they create oil without scientific intervention (like the algae), I'm not putting any stock in it.

Offline Jude

Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2011, 12:34:37 PM »
According to this computer simulation, it's possible, but not through bacterial metabolism:

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-hydrocarbons-deep-earth.html

Offline gaggedLouise

  • Quim Queen | Collaborative juicy writer
  • Champion
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Jan 2011
  • Location: Scandinavia
  • Gender: Female
  • Bound, gagged and unarmed but still dangerous.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2011, 01:14:37 PM »
Yes, it seems bacteria can do that and there's been some attempts to smash two flies with the same swatter by making bacteria suck up CO2, then making them produce liquids that could provide a substitute for crude oil.

http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/22/future-shock-a-new-paradigm-in-advanced-biofuels-technologies/

Read about that last year and it sounds very promising.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2011, 01:20:23 PM »
Aren't the microbes (including both bacteria and algae here) involved in that genetically modified to produce the fuel?  I agree it seems promising as a future energy source, but I don't think that it occurs without human intervention.

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2011, 01:24:52 PM »
There have been several projects looking into this. The thing is, for the moment, the time and effort involved are not good enough for commercial grade production of petroleum. Now. Of course 25 years ago only the chip producers thought they could break the gigahertz rating on processors.

Time, and work will tell. If I was a petroleum company, I'd be quietly investing in it. This would be my way to give Opec the finger and find a way to break free of the money drain.

Offline gaggedLouise

  • Quim Queen | Collaborative juicy writer
  • Champion
  • Enchanter
  • *
  • Join Date: Jan 2011
  • Location: Scandinavia
  • Gender: Female
  • Bound, gagged and unarmed but still dangerous.
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2011, 01:27:22 PM »
Aren't the microbes (including both bacteria and algae here) involved in that genetically modified to produce the fuel?  I agree it seems promising as a future energy source, but I don't think that it occurs without human intervention.

yes, they are modified. It wouldn't happen in nature, at least not on this planet. It's the energy and climate aspects that make those attempts so interesting.

Offline Oniya

  • StoreHouse of Useless Trivia
  • Oracle
  • Carnite
  • *
  • Join Date: Sep 2008
  • Location: Just bouncing through. Hi! City of Roses, Pennsylvania
  • Gender: Female
  • One bad Motokifuka. Also cute and FLUFFY!
  • My Role Play Preferences
  • View My Rolls
  • Referrals: 3
Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2011, 01:33:19 PM »
Just confirming.  The information linked in the original post seemed to indicate that 'something' was naturally refilling the deep oil fields, and speculating on a metabolic process that was just 'happening' out there in the wild.  That's the thing I'm skeptical about.

Seeing the things that I have on ordinary diesel engines running on filtered restaurant fry-oil waste makes me optimistic about creating alternative fuel sources, but I temper that with quite a bit of practicality.

Offline Callie Del Noire

Re: Abiogenic petroleum origins
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2011, 01:43:08 PM »
Time, and money, are what will make this work.. or some other potential source of fuel. One of the things that has delayed this sort of thing from working is the laziness of American Business. I hate to say it but Corporate America has gotten very short sighted in the last few decades. The long view is rapidly becoming a bad word.

Time and money would make this sort of tech very lucrative. If you could turn it into a process that could be done here in the US you could flip the OPEC folks the bird and make a TON here.