Word of the Day Challenge

Started by Britwitch, December 16, 2018, 10:59:34 AM

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Chasing Dreams

When she arrived at work, it was clear to see that many were in a tizzy about something and no one would tell her what was going on.  Many were whispering something she couldn't quite make out as she walked to her office to find a letter sealed by a signet she hadn't expected to see again. She knew who the letter was from, but she hadn't seen him since college and it had been three years since either of them had been there. She looked up only to realize her coworkers were whispering about her and were curious how she knew someone well above her station, but she just let them wonder as she opened the letter to find an invitation.
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Chasing Dreams

She wasn't a fan of seeing movies because she'd rather read a book or hang out with her friends. She caved in and went to see a movie with her friends and regretted her decision as the movie had a MacGuffin. She knew there were times that there needed to be fillers in a movie, but in the movie's case, it was a bit too much for her liking.
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Daeva

callous
adjective| KAL-us
 


Definition

1abeing hardened and thickened

1b having calluses

2afeeling no emotion

2b feeling or showing no sympathy for others HARD-HEARTED







Weekly Theme

Fairytales


Did You Know?

callus is a hard, thickened area of skin that develops usually from friction or irritation over time. Such a hardened area often leaves one less sensitive to the touch, so it's no surprise that the adjective callous, in addition to describing skin that is hard and thick, can also be used as a synonym for harsh or insensitive. Both callus and callous come via Middle English from Latin. The figurative sense of callous entered English almost 300 years after the literal sense, and Robert Louis Stevenson used it aptly when he wrote in Treasure Island "But, indeed, from what I saw, all these buccaneers were as callous as the sea they sailed on."



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Daeva

quirk
noun| KWERK
 


Definition

1aan abrupt twist or curve

1ba peculiar trait IDIOSYNCRASY

2a groove separating a bead or other molding from adjoining members


Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

Did you expect quirk to be a noun meaning "a peculiarity of action or behavior"? If so, you're probably not alone; the "peculiarity" sense of the noun quirk is commonly known and has been a part of our language since the 17th century. But quirk has long worn other hats in English, too. The sense meaning "a curve, turn, or twist" has named everything from curving pen marks on paper (i.e., flourishes) to witty turns of phrase to the vagaries or twists of fate. In contemporary English, the verb quirk can be used in referring to facial expressions, especially those that involve crooked smiles or furrowed eyebrows.




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Chasing Dreams

During her science lab in college, her group was tasked with listing fissile objects and things. Their list wasn't as long as others who had a different challenge, but they still came up with ten things.
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Daeva

inveigh
verb| in-VAY
 


Definition

to protest or complain bitterly or vehemently RAIL


Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

It's all well and good to complain, kvetch, gripe, or grumble about whatever happens to be vexing you, but for a stronger effect, we suggest inveighing against it. (You'll almost always want to include the against, by the way.) Inveigh was borrowed with its meaning from the Latin verb invehi (invehi can also mean "to attack"), which is also a form of invehere, meaning "to carry in." Another invehere descendant is the closely-related noun invective, which refers to insulting or abusive language. Nota bene: it's not necessary to hurl invective when inveighing against what irks you.


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Jaclyn

  From the moment they took her from her home deep in the woods to the day when they rode her in a cart to the center of the town, she inveighed against their ignorance and brutality. Yet as her hands and feet were bound to the stake emerging from the pile of dry kindling and quick burning birch firewood, her voice rose and rained curses down upon them, that their women be barren for two generations and that the menfolk be stricken with a pox unto their death and that they die alone in burning agony. And as the flames silenced her, the magistrate and sheriff and gaolers and jurors all started to scratch at their chests and groins and look about them, seeking the man who had first accused the woman they had just burned.

Chasing Dreams

She hadn't known if she was going to get along with the person she was partnered up with for the project at school because she had heard he had some odd quirks that made him a bit difficult to work with. She was hoping it wasn't true, but knew she'd find out in time if the rumors were true.
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Daeva

maladroit
adjective| mal-uh-DROYT
 


Definition

lacking adroitness INEPT


Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

Maladroit is perhaps an awkward fit for casual speech—outside of the occasional Weezer album title, one most often encounters it in formal writing—but you can remember its meaning by breaking it down into its French building blocks. The first is the word mal, meaning "badly," which may be familiar from English words including malaise ("a vague sense of mental or moral ill-being") and malodorous ("having a bad odor"). The second is adroit, meaning "having or showing skill, cleverness, or resourcefulness in handling situations." Middle French speakers put those pieces together as maladroit to describe the clumsy and incompetent among them, and English speakers borrowed the word intact. We'd adopted adroit from them a short time before.



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Chasing Dreams

She wasn't sure how she ended up being partnered up with him because they didn't run in the same social circles nor had any friends in common. She was trying to give him the benefit of the doubt, but it was difficult to do so after three work meetings with him. The man had a callous attitude about the project that could make or break her changes at getting a promotion at work. She realized he didn't care because he was only filling in for someone  else. She tried to talk to him about why it was important, but she failed to get through to him.
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Daeva

cupid
noun| KYOO-pid
 


Definition

1 the Roman god of erotic love
2 a figure that represents Cupid as a naked usually winged boy often holding a bow and arrow


Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

According to Roman mythology, Cupid was the son of Mercury, the messenger god, and Venus, the goddess of love. In Roman times, the winged "messenger of love" was sometimes depicted in armor, but no one is sure if that was intended as a sarcastic comment on the similarities between warfare and romance, or a reminder that love conquers all. Cupid was generally seen as a good spirit who brought happiness to all, but his matchmaking could cause mischief. Venus wasn't above using her son's power to get revenge on her rivals, and she once plotted to have the beautiful mortal Psyche fall in love with a despicable man. But the plan backfired: Cupid fell in love with Psyche, and she eventually became his immortal wife.




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Chasing Dreams

There was nothing she could do to say a single word to help her friend as the one speaking to her wasn't letting her friend utter a word. She watched as the person inveighed about a policy her friend could only enforce, but not change.
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Daeva

enervate
verb| EN-er-vayt
 


Definition

lacking physical, mental, or moral vigor ENERVATED


Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

Do not let any haziness in your understanding of enervate cause you to be enervated. Confusion about this somewhat rare word is reasonable, and aided greatly by the fact that although enervate looks like a plausible product of the joining of energize and invigorate, it is actually an antonym of both. Enervate comes from a form of the Latin verb enervare, which literally means "to remove the sinews of," and figuratively means simply "to weaken." Enervare was formed from the prefix e-, meaning "out of," and nervus, meaning "sinewnerve." So etymologically, at least, someone who is enervated is "out of nerve." Knowing this, you no longer need be unnerved by it.




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Chasing Dreams

There was nothing more annoying to her than having to deal with doing everything on her own because those who were supposed to help weren't doing so. Their maladroit skills were far below what they should have been to help with the project they were tasked with working on for their client.
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Chasing Dreams

One of her assignments for her mythology class was to write a paper on god or goddess they were studying in either Greek or Roman mythology.  She ended up writing her five page paper on cupid since the paper was due in February. She had enjoyed doing the research on cupid and had included a few of his mischievous acts in her paper while making sure to cite all of her sources.
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Chasing Dreams

It had been a long month and a half for her as she had many meetings and social gatherings she had no choice but to attend.  Now that she had more than a day to breathe, she realized she was completely enervated with nothing left in her to do much more than. Space out as she relaxed on her couch.
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Daeva

turbid
adjective| TER-bid
 


Definition

1thick or opaque with or as if with roiled sediment

2 deficient in clarity or purity FOULMUDDY




Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

Turbid and turgid (which means "swollen or distended" or "overblown, pompous, or bombastic") are frequently mistaken for one another, and it's no wonder. Not only do the two words differ by only a letter, they are often used in contexts where either word could fit. For example, a flooded stream can be simultaneously cloudy and swollen, and badly written prose might be both unclear (another sense of turbid) and grandiloquent. Nevertheless, the distinction between these two words, however fine, is an important one for conveying exact shades of meaning, so it's a good idea to keep them straight. Turbid, like its relative turbulent, comes ultimately from the Latin noun turba, meaning "confusion" or "crowd," while turgid comes from the Latin verb turgēre, "to be swollen."



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Daeva

rapport
noun| ra-POR
 


Definition

a friendly, harmonious relationship



Weekly Theme

Romance


Did You Know?

The word rapport bears a resemblance to a more common English word, report, which is no coincidence: both words come ultimately from the Latin verb portare, meaning "to carry," and both traveled through French words meaning "to bring back" on their way to English. Report has been in use since the 14th century, when it entered Middle English by way of Anglo-French. Rapport was first used in the mid-15th century as a synonym of report in its "account or statement" meaning, but that meaning had become obsolete by the mid-19th century. It wasn't until the early 20th century that English speakers borrowed rapport back from French in the meaning of "a friendly, harmonious relationship." We're happy to report that rapport has since flourished, and we trust this friendly word will stick around a while.




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Daeva

fathom
verb| FA-thum
 


Definition

1 a unit of length equal to six feet (1.83 meters) used especially for measuring the depth of water 

2 COMPREHENSION



Weekly Theme

Slice of Life


Did You Know?

Fathom comes from the Old English word fæthm, meaning "outstretched arms." The noun fathom, which now commonly refers to a measure (especially of depth) of six feet, was originally used for the distance, fingertip to fingertip, created by stretching one's arms straight out from the sides of the body. In one of its earliest uses, the verb fathom was a synonym of our modern embrace: to fathom someone was to encircle the person with your arms. By the 1600s fathom had taken to the seas, with the verb being used to mean "to measure by a sounding line." At the same time, the verb also developed senses synonymous with probe and investigate, and it is now frequently used to refer to the act of getting to the bottom of something, figuratively speaking.





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Daeva

prestigious
adjective| preh-STIH-juss
 


Definition

1having prestige HONORED

2  of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery


Weekly Theme

Slice of Life


Did You Know?

You might expect, based on how adjectives are often formed in English, that today’s word is an extension of the noun prestige. However, although both words share the same Latin root, they entered English by different routes and at different times. Moreover, both adjective and noun once had more to do with trickery than respect when they were first used. Prestigious came directly from the Latin adjective praestigiosis, meaning “full of tricks” or “deceitful,” and had a similar meaning upon entering English in the mid-16th century. Praestigiosis in turn came from the plural noun praestigiae, meaning “conjurer’s tricks.” This noun also gave English the word prestige, though it first passed through French and arrived a century after prestigious. Though it wasn’t first on the block, prestige influenced prestigious in a different way, by eventually developing an extended sense of “standing or esteem.” That change spurred a similar development in prestigious, which now means simply “illustrious or esteemed.”
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Wheeze

Word of the day: prestigious 
Theme: slice of life 

--- 

Money, power, fame all things he had obtained, a prestige held by him in this tiny town. He could walk to any restaurant and get a table quickly without any reservation. Though that was only until he had moved to the big city. Making his was to a prestigious restaurant, a steakhouse packed on a weekend night, expecting a table as soon as he entered. 

Dressed in a nice vest and button down he stepped towards the hostess podium, "table for one please."

"Did you have a reservation?" She asked and he merely shook his head. 

"No, but do you know exactly who I am?" He asked, rather miffed as a glare worked it's way to his features. 

The hostess gave him him a pointed look, humoring the man, "no, who are you?" She asked. 

"David Crowley," he offered smugly.

"Who are you? The next table is in an hour."

Chasing Dreams

There was nothing but frustration coursing through her because she knew the task ahead of her was going to be a rough road. She had no clue how she was supposed to build a rapport with someone who has been her arch enemy since their childhood even of it had been more than six years since they last saw each other. She knew the two of them were like oil and water and that was going to make working together on the project even more difficult because she wasn't sure if either her or him could put their differences aside.
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Chasing Dreams

In her line of work, there was nothing more prestigious than being selected to plan the charity gala hosted by her company's CEO. She had wanted to be plan the gala for years and had even dreamed about what it would be like if she had ever had the opportunity to do so.
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Daeva

buttress
noun| BUTT-russ
 


Definition

1 a projecting structure of masonry or wood for supporting or giving stability to a wall or building
2aa projecting part of a mountain or hill

2b a horny protuberance on a horse's hoof at the heel
2c the broadened base of a tree trunk or a thickened vertical part of it
3 something that supports or strengthens



Weekly Theme

Slice of Life


Did You Know?

The word buttress first budded in the world of architecture during the 14th century, when it was used to describe an exterior support that projects from a wall to resist the sideways force, called thrust, created by the load on an arch or roof. The word ultimately comes from the Anglo-French verb buter, meaning "to thrust." Buter is also the source of our verb butt, meaning "to thrust, push, or strike with the head or horns." Buttress developed figurative use relatively soon after its adoption, being applied to anything that supports or strengthens something else. No buts about it: the world would not be the same without buttresses.
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Daeva

lampoon
verb| lam-POON
 


Definition

 a harsh satire usually directed against an individual


Weekly Theme

Slice of Life


Did You Know?

Lampoon can be a noun or a verb. The noun lampoon (meaning "satire" or, specifically, "a harsh satire usually directed against an individual") was first used in English in the 17th century and may be familiar from the names of humor publications such as The Harvard Lampoon and its now-defunct spinoff National Lampoon. Both the noun and the verb come from the French word lampon, which likely originated from lampons, a form of the verb lamper, meaning "to drink to the bottom." So what is the connection? Lampons! (meaning "Let us guzzle!"—that is, drink greedily) was a frequent refrain in 17th-century French satirical poems.
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